Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

Archive for October, 2014

Paint Shop 2: Policies and Guidelines That Will Work

There’s one way to operate a hotel or facility paint shop. That is with a set of easy-to-follow policies and guidelines (vs. rules) that fit the engineering department – and the organization.

The shop size can total one wall with a few shelves, a large room with a separate workshop area, or an entire small building, or shed. The rules will be the same, basically.

 

Some PAINT SHOP basics: JUST DO IT!

 

JUST DO IT: Keep shop neat. Picked up. Swept up.

JUST DO IT: Keep shop floor clean, and clear of parts, tools; spills, piles of anything, garbage.

JUST DO IT: Keep workshop clean, swept up and ready for next project.

JUST DO IT: Put things away – and in their proper places – when you’re finished with them.

DON’T DO IT: No “borrowing” of paint shop/engineering/company property for personal use.

DON’T DO IT: No “loaning” or “giving” of paint shop/engineering property to other departments – unless your supervisor authorizes. TIP: Get a written authorization.

 

1. Set up a Sign-out and Sign-in system for all paint shop property.

 

2. Put up a Paint Shop bulletin board. Post inventory list, requisition list, FYIs, cartoons, etc. TIP: And, keep those lists updated!

 

3. Tightly close all cans, bottles, tubes, boxes, bags, containers, etc.

 

4. Thoroughly clean all tools before storing back on the shelf, in the cupboard, in kiosk, etc.

 

5. Clean equipment; and make a note of any repairs needed, before returning to its proper storage area(s).

 

A. Flush out spray gun spray lines. Clean nozzles, tips, hoses, product containers, etc.

B. Soak and clean spray guns to prevent sticking, clogging, damage to mechanisms.

C. Empty out any unused product from container; place in storage container for recycling – eg. paint, polyurethane, chemical treatment.

D. Wash out each container with appropriate cleaning agent. Let dry.

 

6. Do basic repairs and maintenance on tools and equipment before storing.

 

7. Store products and materials appropriately and safely. Follow MSDS, UBC, HAZMAT, EPA codes.

 

A. All cans, spray cans, bottles, boxes, tubs: Upright.

B. Wallcovering rolls, boxes: Upright.All tubes – eg. paint, tinting.

 

8. Store all tools and equipment in a safe manner.

 

A. Brushes: Bristles up (no cover); bristles upright (sturdy cover); bristles down (in “wet-storage” brush container).

B. Roller covers: on end, to maintain nap integrity.

C. Electrical tools: Turn to “OFF” position before re-shelving, re-storing.

D. Mechanical tools: Close/fold up handles and levers before re-shelving or re-storing.

E. Saw blades, sharp edges: Remove, retract, or cover. Store in visible spot of toolbox/cabinet.

F. Sharp objects, scissors: Close up; place with handles up, or facing YOU.

G. Razor blades: Retract into holders/handles; or store individually in closed, marked box.

 

9. Store nuts, bolts, washers, screws, etc. in plastic organizer boxes – or small plastic/metal containers.

 

10. Store small tools in divided tool chest, toolbox, small carry-all, unbreakable containers.

 

11. Store like products together, like materials together, like tools together, etc.

 

12. Store all products, materials, supplies, tools, and equipment in dry, safe places.

 

13. Keep records of inventory use, loss, breakage, disrepair, “retirement,” etc.

 

14. Regularly, post a list of items that (a) are running low, (b) need to be requisitioned – and when, (c) need to be RUSH ordered, (d) are no longer used or kept in stock.

 

15. Post in visible spot a running list of your requisitioned items. Keep track of requisition and order status. Display date of order.

 

16. Requisition basic supplies before you get low. Keep checking with supervisor and/or purchasing manager about their order and delivery status.

 

17. Be cost-conscious and budget-time aware in selecting and ordering products, materials, supplies, new tools, etc.

 

18. Know which products, materials, supplies, etc. cannot be compromised – quality and durability versus cost.

 

19. Keep accurate records. Neat, complete, easy-to-understand, easy-to-use.

 

20. Discard products and materials that are no longer usable – dried up, discolored, faded, damaged (mold, mildew, water, sun); frayed, bug-infested.

 

** TIP: Fill partially full containers of paint, stain, varnish, etc. with sand, or other absorbent.

 

21. Discard products, materials, supplies, etc. that do not meet product standards and safety codes. WHY: Regulators and inspectors are watching. Too, people can get very ill.

 

22. Promptly discard damaged or broken tools and equipment that cannot be repaired – and are too dangerous to use in present condition. WHY: FIRE and SAFETY hazards.

 

23. Discard used rags, paper towels, etc. – especially those with strong odors, fumes, residue.

** TIP: Soak rags in soapy water to neutralize combustibility or flammability.

 

24. Report problems promptly to your supervisor, and to teammates. Keep everyone informed!

 

25. Promptly report losses, damages, and thefts of products, materials, supplies, tools, equipment.

WHY: It’s company policy! Also, some items may need to be replaced a.s.a.p.

 

Comply with the safety rules on an ongoing basis. It’s the best way to prevent accidents in your paint shop.

Establish policies and guidelines that are DO-ABLE.  Establishing that policy and practice helps all of your teammates – especially engineering/facility – keep the paint shop looking good, and working great! For everyone!

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Thank you for visiting “Painting  with Bob.”

Hotel Engineering Team Training – Pilot Project 2015

In August of 2014, a large hotel chain conducted a three-day run-through of a skyp training program that will activate in 2015. The unique, standardized program is geared toward the chain’s facilities services’ team members. The company’s goal: Establish, standardize and unify practices and operations in its engineering departments throughout the chain.

The double goal for team members is specific: preparedness for change, and job security. Each worker – painter, maintenance tech, engineering tech, HVAC technician, etc. – will be able to (1) check-mate his or her basic techniques and skills, (2) update capabilities, and (3) learn to use newer and/or better methods, products, materials, tools, equipment, and systems.

The program was developed by experienced craftspersons in construction, property maintenance, and power systems operations. It features multi-disciplinary, hands-on workshops in painting, maintenance, HVAC, electrical, mechanical, carpentry, plumbing, power plant, groundskeeping.

Each session will be skyped, on a rotational basis, into each property’s secured, employees-only telecom system. Each will be offered three days a week, at different times – again within forty-five days. This flexible feature tries to accommodate for unexpected departmental work surges, emergency situations and worker demands.

Participation is required. Each team member takes every workshop in his or her core job description. In addition, each person takes at least one workshop in every other job area in the department. And, every team member takes each workshop during his or her work shift.

 

Basically, here’s how it will work…

 

  1. A team member signs up for each training session two-to-three weeks in advance.
  2. A team member is encouraged to take all training sessions in his/her area before taking others.
  3. A team member can sign up, in advance, for the entire series of workshops in his core area.
  4. A team member reserves the option to take any other session before completing core program. 5. Class “size” is limited to two team members at a time.
  5. Each workshop runs thirty minutes.

Each workshop will follow a similar format…

 

  1. Each engineering department site is set up, in advance, for the next scheduled workshop.
  2. At his or her respective site, each team member “student” is provided with the same products, materials, supplies, tools, and equipment being used by the trade craftsperson and instructor.
  3. Each team member uses the technique, or performs the task, that’s being demonstrated by the craftsperson/instructor.
  4. Every team member can e-mail or text questions and comments to that workshop’s instructor after each session, or at a later time or date.
  5. A team member completes each workshop by logging onto his or her online registration page.
  6. After completion, a team member can access the DVD-version of each workshop – at any time, at work.
  7. All products, materials, supplies, and tools used at a specific hotel site become part of that engineering department’s inventory – and can be used by team members in the future.

The training program draws on the filmed systems used for years by employer and franchise giants in nearly every industry. A painter friend works for the hotel chain, and attended the three-day run-through in August. He described the five-minute, on-line/mobile app critique at the end of each workshop.

“The questions were very specific. No ‘strongly agree to strongly disagree’ rating system. No multiple choices… Clearly the program’s developers – and the hotel people – wanted honest feedback. Input they could use to make the training even more helpful to engineering people.”

His enthusiastic attitude about the required program reminded me of something:

Every facility painter – every painterthat I know is always learning new things. In fact, they look for new things to learn. And, they look for ways both to improve and to upgrade what they already know. That’s what makes every one of them stand out from the crowd!

 

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“The top quality paintbrush can be improved upon only so much. The painter that puts that brush to work is always looking for – and seeing – room for improvement.”  RDH

 

Paint Shop I: Organizing and Storing, Part 3 and 4: Keeping Things in Place, Maintaining Inventory List

“Inventorying” your paint shop inventory is one thing. Creating – gridding out – spaces/places for everything is another challenge – and opportunity. Putting and keeping your inventory in its place is a third challenge.

Maintaining your paint shop inventory can be a major challenge. An ongoing one, in fact. Especially, if your budget is constantly in the “cutback” mode.

Take heart, fellow painters! Especially if you’re responsible for paint shop operations. Sooner or later, you will get the support you need to run your shop right. So that it can benefit the organization, and the people it’s meant to serve.

 

3. Putting and Keeping Everything in Its Place. Keep related items together.

 

A. Label each can, container, box, package before placing it on a shelf, in a cupboard, etc.

(1) Tape appropriate COLOR CHIP on the lid and front of every can of paint, stain, varnish, etc.

(2) On OPENED containers: Tape a note showing current date, approximate quantity inside; designated area where product/material is used – if any.   Example: “10/01/2014, 1/2 gallon, guest rooms 100-200/even numbered”

(3) Tape a PATTERN SWATCH on the top and front panel of every box, package, roll of wallcovering.

—-Tape a note showing current date, approximate quantity, designated area where item is used.

 B. Do the same for your custom tinted and ordered products and materials.

 

4. Maintain a Paint Shop Inventory List.

 

A. Install a MASTER LIST on your shop computer.

(1) Identify where each category of items is located: General area, cupboard, storage shed, etc.

(2) Remove specific items when you use them up or discard them.

(3) List new items when they come into the shop. Include items to be used up same day as delivery.

(4) Update your list every month. Know where you stand supply-wise.

 B. Print out at least two hard copies of the list. Do this on a quarterly basis, at least.

(1) Put one copy in very conspicuous spot in the Paint Shop.

(2) Give a folder/bound copy to your supervisor.

NOTE: An inventory list can be an immense help at budget time, departmental supplies requisitioning times, for departmental meetings, when someone takes over for you (eg. annual vacation, illness, injury).

 

SOME SPACE-SAVING TIPS:

 

TIP 1: Make use of free-standing tool and supply kiosks – for small items.

TIP 2: Clean, empty paint cans and buckets make handy storage containers – eg. small brushes, roller covers, extenders.

TIP 3: Plastic 2-to-4 drawer storage units, on rollers, make great “Good-to-Go” portables for multiple projects/work orders that require similar supplies and tools. Dollar and charity thrift stores can be great places to buy these.

TIP 4: Put “dead” space to work for you. Under shelves, between cupboards, cabinets, on walls, etc.

TIP 5: Is your storage space limited? Place often-used products and materials in their own smaller section, area, cupboard, etc. Then, organize the rest by interior and exterior.

TIP 6: Place little-used products and materials in a nearby, accessible storage area/room. Example: Engineering supply shed. Get your supervisor’s approval beforehand.

 

Take heart, fellow painters! Especially, if you are responsible for paint shop operations. Better days and better ways are ahead for you. And, your Paint Shop!

 

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Find a few minutes, and a peaceful place – at work – to just sit and breathe easy. Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Every Hotel’s/Facility’s Team Member Can Learn Something from Its Painter: Part 2

Painting and decorating is a very multi-faceted job. It requires an extensive knowledge of and experience with both trade and construction industry methods, products, materials, supplies, tools, and equipment. Also, it requires the ability to deal with a variety of factors: weather and climate, property (age, condition, use, size), budget, schedule, etc.

Any hotel or facility team member – teammate of the property’s painter – is in an enviable position. He or she has access to this skilled craftsperson. All kinds (of helpful information is in his or her head. And, at his or her fingertips.

Tap into this valuable resource. Your friendly team painter – and teammate – could be your best painting and decorating advisor ever!

Continuing from Part 1, here are some other things that you can learn from the painter with your hotel or facility.

 

12. How to inspect a wallcovering shipment before using it.

 

A. Carefully! Completely! Every roll! From beginning-to-end of roll!

B. Multiple rolls: Make sure the numbers are from the same run or batch. If not pattern or color may be different.

C. Check if pattern aligns properly from roll to roll.

D. Reversed vinyls: Check for color matching, especially for darker colors.

 

13. How to cut wallcovering sheets to match the room’s layout.

 

A. Full sheets: Cut all of the full sheets first.

B. Cut pieces above and below windows or doors, measured to match.

C. In-sequence sheets: Mark them, if necessary.

D. Tops of sheets: Label, if needed.

E. Corners of sheets: Mark for commercial vinyls, or for solid color non-patterned papers.

 

14. How to prep a surface or area for applying wallcovering.

 

A. Sand surface smooth.

B. Patch surface where necessary, using a chemical-cured, or powdered joint compound.

C. Apply sizing or oil-based primer to the walls.

D. Sand primed surfaces when fully dry.

E. Mark vertical lines at corners of walls so sheets are plumb.

 

15. How to set up a work area for applying wallcovering.

 

A. Protect floor with dropcloths, particularly where cutting and paste table(s) will set.

B. Set up pasting and cutting area: tables, blades/knives, level, sponges.

C. Place necessary materials and supplies in area: paste materials, rolls/boxes of wallcovering (inspected previously), tools (measuring tape and ruler, cutting/trimming knives, pasting brushes, smoothing knife, seamer, etc.)

D. Put bucket of warm, clean water at paste table, for cleaning it as needed.

E. TIP: Keep a second bucket of warm water nearby, for cleaning tools – as necessary.

F. TIP: Have a small bucket of very clean, cotton rags nearby, too.

G. Place sizeable, lined garbage container nearby for scrap wallcovering.

 

16. How a painter/paperhanger actually applies wallcovering.

 

A. Apply adhesive to wallcovering sheets, if product is not self-adhesive.

B. Unfold top section of sheet, aligning in proper place; then smooth down using a brush, or plastic edge smoothing tool.

C. Hold onto sheet with one hand, and smooth rest of sheet into place.

D. Seam sheets either by butting or overlapping seams. “Seamless seams.”

E. Fit and trim wallcovering around moldings and fixtures on wall or ceiling.

 

17. How to clean up after finishing wallcovering job.

 

A. Remove paint, filler, polyurethane from rim of can, also spray can nozzles

B. Reseal/re-closing and storing paint cans, caulking tubes, filler/putty tubs.

C. Soak tools used to apply wallpaper paste

(1) Wheat/cellulose/clay water-based paste: Soak brushes in bucket/can of clean, warm water.

D. Clean tools:

(1) Soak in warm, soapy water; then rinse.

(2) Residual paste can be removed with warm water and carbonated water for hard-to-clean vinyls.

E. Read blogs: “Paint Shop 1: Organizing…” ”Paint Shop 2: “Policies and Guidelines.”

 

18. How to protect and store your tools.

 

A. Brushes: Stand upright, bristles down. Read blog: “Paint Shop 1: Organizing.”

*** TIP: In a rush? Wrap brush or roller in newspaper, or wax paper. Secure with sturdy rubber band till you can clean brush thoroughly.

B. Roller covers/naps: Air, till nap dry. Store upright in tool box, or clean 1-gal. paint can.

C. Artist brushes: Air, till bristles dry. Store, bristles up or flat in brush case. Never down, unless you’ve wrapped brush.

D. Spray equipment: Flush properly with compatible solvent (water, mineral spirits). Clean spray tips. Remove any dried paint.

E. Central storage container: Store all hand tools together creates immediate availability. Also it reduces time looking for tools in different locations.

 

SPECIAL THINGS TO LOOK FOR…

 

1. Darker wallcoverings: Wash with baking or carbonated soda-based water wash. Remove paste thoroughly.

2. Pasting: Apply adhesive evenly and very smoothly to back of wallcovering.

3. Pasting option: Apply adhesive to the wall.

4. Watch carefully: Do not UNDERCUT wallcovering when trimming around something.

5. Hanging multiple sheets vinyl on new drywall: Cut seams before you go too far.

—- CAUTION: Drywall paper may pull loose if you wait too long.

 

A FEW QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR PAINTER WHEN IT’S CONVENIENT

 

1. Which paint is better: flat wall paint, semi-gloss, or gloss?

2. How can I get something painted when I have a low budget?

3. Would you consider bartering? Eg. Painting our house for design help with website?

4. I have a friend that needs some painting done. Can I give him your cell phone number?

 

QUESTIONS NOT TO ASK YOUR PAINTER IF YOU WANT TO KEEP AS A FRIEND

 

1. Can you recommend a painter? I need some work done in my home.

2. Can you paint my house for free? TIP: Ask about “bartering.” See last section.

3. Is it all right if I don’t recommend you, or act as a reference?

4. Can you fix my week-end wallpapering mess – as a favor?

5. If you have a stain-finished door, what can I do to prepare it for finish painting?

 

A Painter’s Point to Ponder:

 

Being asked by co-workers, at whatever levels, to share tips from one’s trade is an honor. Especially, when done with genuine respect and interest.

It gives added meaning to the “team”-anything connection. And, it deepens the mutual, and individual, sense of worth and belonging.

 

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Please find a way to help someone else enjoy this day! Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Paint Shop I: Organizing and Storing, Part 2: Creating a Place

Creating a place for everything in your paint shop is a challenge. Especially, if your wall and floor spaces are limited.

Other factors enter into the process: number of people that use paint shop, location of shop in proximity to main department, and other departments; volume of traffic; who’s in charge of paint shop operations (YOU?); who manages entire area.

If you are responsible for paint shop operations, take charge. Create a plan that will work for you – and those around you. And, GRID your inventory into spaces that help you do your job like the professional that you are!

 

2. Create A Place for Everything: Gridding your space into sections by category, and use.

 

A. Interior products/materials:

 

(1) Paints. Sort in order of priority, or frequency of use. Store according to areas/uses.

a. General/base products: Standard colors, general use

b. Designated areas: Guest rooms/suites, offices, front offices, lobby, front desk, corridors, public restrooms, game rooms, food courts, restaurants, computer room, health club, theatre, conference center, etc.

 

(2)  Stains/varnishes/ special finishes.  Store in safety cabinet, designed for flammable or combustible products.

a. General/base products: Standard colors, general use

b. Designated areas: Rooms/suites, offices, lobby, front desk, corridors, restaurants, theatre, conference center, etc.

 

(3) Wallcoverings, borders, murals. Store according to areas used in – and in dry area.

a. General use

b. Designated: Rooms/suites, offices, lobby, front desk, corridors, restaurants, clubs, food court, health club, spa, public restrooms, conference center, etc.

* For each, specify location, room numbers, building numbers/names, etc.

c. Tools: Roller (9-in., 3/8-in. cover); level, broad knives, seam rollers, smoothing brush, plastic smoothing tool; Paper Tiger, paper scraper, 10-in-1 tool; shower cap; dust masks, vinyl gloves.

 

(4) Prep products/supplies. Group similar items together.

a. Sandpapers, caulking tubes/guns, fillers, sanding blocks.

b. Scrapers, putty knives, steel wool, Patch sticks.

c. Solvents, thinners, removers, paint strippers.

d. Cleaning chemicals: TSP (alkaline, grease, de-glosses); denatured alcohol (cleans metal); Calgon, Downy; white vinegar (mild acid rinse);  Goof-off 2;

e. Masking paper, tapes, plastic sheeting, masking film.

 

(5) Cleaning/Clean-up Supplies. Conserve space.  TIP: Store  smaller items inside larger ones.

a. Sponges, bags of rags, buckets.

b. Trash bags – different sizes, strengths

 

(6) Protective gear/Safety items. Store gear together, in same section.

 

TIP: Keep related items together.

 

B. Exterior products/materials/supplies/tools/equipment:  Include special sections like the above in “A.”

 

(1) Paints

 a. General use:

 b. Designated: Pools, gazebos, courts, playgrounds, parks, seating, fencing, front entrance, parking, canopy, asphalt, etc.

 c. Compliance/Safety/Zoning

 

(2) Special coatings – for metal, concrete, asphalt, plastic, tile, etc.

 

(3) Exterior stains, polyurethanes, urethanes

 

(4) Prep and cleaning supplies

 

(5) Tools and equipment

 

(6) Protective gear and safety items

 

PAINT WORKSHOP STORY: My father was a superb journey painter and decorator. One of the best in the trade. And, one of the busiest! When he died suddenly in 1993, he left a major mess in his private workshop on the family’s country property. Chaos is a polite word for the disorganized piles, stacks, buckets, etc. of everything everywhere.

The job of making sense of it all – unearthing the inventory, sorting it, discarding what couldn’t be used, inventorying, labeling, organizing, then assigning a price/value to every item – fell on the grieving shoulders, hands and hearts of my mother and myself. (It didn’t help the grieving process.)

JOURNEY PAINTER’s SHOP TIP: Get your paint shop in shape. And, keep it that way. Whether it amounts to a few shelves, a mid-sized room with an adjacent workroom, or a free-standing building/shed. You’ll be glad that you did. So will everyone around you when they need to step into your shoes. Even for a day, or only an hour.

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Staying organized is much easier than you might think. Once you get used to it! Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Paint Shop I: Organizing and Storing, Part 1: Inventory Your Inventory

I learned young about paint shop operations. Part of my first job, as an apprentice painter, was keeping the paint shops – buildings – clean, inventory organized, and workshop spaces ready to use. (We did a tremendous volume of shop work: sandblasting, painting, finishing, etc.)

For a small painting contractor business, that may have been an easy job. For a major, and still growing, commercial and industrial contractor business, it meant a lot of steady work!

Every paint shop is organized differently. How well it works depends on the painter responsible for its operations. Also, it depends on how well it works for the rest of the team. Team members in the engineering or facility services department; also team members in the other departments within the organization.

When the painter responsible for the paint shop is not around, do enough people in the department know how to handle things? Painting-wise? Is everything being taken care of?

What follows is a two-section tutorial on Paint Shop Operations. Paint Shop I, starting here, covers organizing and storing. It’s divided into four parts: (1) inventory your inventory; (2) creating a place for everything; (3) putting and keeping everything in its place; and, (4) maintaining inventory lists.

 

1: Inventory your shop’s inventory – by category and subcategory.

—What do you have – types, colors, quantities, general condition?

 

A. Products/Materials:

(1) Paint – Latexes, epoxies, oils – Total no. of gallons, according to paint type, color.

(2) Finishes – Stains, varnishes, urethanes, shellac

(3) Coatings – Rust/corrosion prevention, anti-fouling, elastomeric, chemical-resistant, UV protective, waterproofing, heat-resistant

(4) Wallcoverings – Papers, vinyls, foils, flocks, textures, patterns, grasscloths; borders, murals

 

B. Preparation/Supplies:

(1) Sandpapers – What grades; total number of sheets in each grade

(2) Caulking tubes – Types (eg. for kitchen/bath, exterior); total number of each type

(3) Solvents – 1 gal. each of most used products: mineral spirits, lacquer thinners, denatured alcohol

(4) Paint tint kit – Universal tints

 

C. Work area supplies:

(1) Dropcloths – At least 3 – 4 ft. by 15 ft. for clean interior use; 2 – 4 ft. by 15 ft. for

exterior use; 2 – 16 ft. by 20 ft. for wide covering.

(2) Sheeting – 1 roll 20 ft. by 100 ft. plastic; 3+ smaller rolls

(3) Buckets, sponges – 1/2 gal., 1 gal., 2 gal., 5 gal; natural sea sponges (assorted sizes, thicknesses)

(4) Masking paper, masking tapes – 1 dozen each ¾-to 1 ½ inch masking tape.

 

D. Tools:

(1) Brushes – Assortment nylon or China bristle: 1-in., 2-in., 2 ½-in., 3-in., 4-in

(2) Rollers, roller covers – Assortment 3-in. to 12-in. rollers; ¼-in. to 1/1/2-in. naps.

(3) Paint tray, paint screen

(4) Broad knives, level, straight-edge

(5) Basic tool kit: Hammer, screwdrivers, wrench, pliers, clamps, etc.

 

E. Equipment:

(1) Spray guns, hose – Airless sprayer greater than ½ gal. perminate capacity

(2) Compressor – Greater than 6 OFM for spray painting

(3) Ladders – 1+ 24-ft. extension, 16-ft. stepladder, 5-ft. platform aluminum ladder

(4) Pressure washer – Greater than 2000 psi

(5) Garden sprayer system

 

F. Protective gear and Safety items:

(1) Boxes/ packages of disposable gloves, breathing masks

(2) Organic vapor respirator, also spare cartridges; dust mask supply, safety glasses

(3) Disposable plastic suits, hats, shoe coverings, vinyl/rubber gloves

(4) Signs: WET PAINT, CAUTION, KEEP OFF, Caution Tape

 

G. Cleaning/Clean-up Supplies:

(1) Sponges, bags of rags, buckets (2-qt. plastic), floor mops

(2) Glass/mirror cleaner, spot remover

(3) Standard trash bags, heavy duty trash bags; re-sealable plastic bags (eg. for storing hardware, switch plates)

(4) Small portable vacuum cleaner, shop vacuum; push brooms, large dustpans; dusting brushes, deck brush w/extension.

 

H. Vehicle/Golf Cart Maintenance:

(1) Car wax, upholstery cleaner

(2) Oil, tire gauge, tire pump

(3) Battery charger

(4) Small portable vacuum, combo mini-broom/dustpan

 

I. Recordkeeping, Writing, Presentations:

(1) Software programs – Excel, Outlook/Express, Word, PowerPoint, Quickbooks

(2) Printable forms and worksheets on internet

(3) Journals, ledgers, and other systems available from office supply –in-store, on-line.

 

Your Paint Shop inventory pertains to much more than a few cans of paint in your standard, frequently-used colors. It pertains to everything that you and every person in your department may need to perform painting-related tasks, work orders, projects, etc.

 

PAINT SHOP MANAGER TIP: You need to know what you have on-hand. You need to know what you’re supposed to keep on-hand. You need to know what you need to get on-hand. To be ready to go! Or, as close to that point as possible. At all times.

 

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Organize your Paint Shop. It saves lots of time. It minimizes mistakes, frustration and accidents. It cuts costs like you wouldn’t believe!

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Every Hotel’s/Facility’s Team Member Can Learn Something from Its Painter: Part 1

Hotel/facility painters get noticed. Often! In their “whites,” they are recognized easily. During any work day, they are watched by various teammates. Certain teammates or managers tend to be regular observers.

What can you learn from your hotel or facility painter? Here are some possible clues – and tips.

 

1. How to select the right products or materials for the job.

 

A.  Surface/”substrate” type: New, bare wood; old, painted wood; varnished wood; metal, brick, stone, concrete; covered with wallcovering ( paper, vinyl, flock, foil, etc.).

B.  Surface’s current color: Light, dark; bleed-through; solid, patterned; new, faded.

C.  Area’s purpose: One-person use; high or low traffic; interior or exterior; kitchen, children; entry/exit; garage; basement, stairs, stairway.

D.  Budget: Tight-One coat of paint! Flexible-Primer, one finish coat. Big-Top-quality job.

E.  Job’s required life-span: 1 year or less; 2-3 years; indefinitely.

 

2. How to determine and estimate amount of paint needed. Be on the safe side: Buy extra.

 

A.  Walls: Measure two walls. Multiply numbers. Example: 10-ft. x14-ft. = 140 sq. ft. room

(1)  To paint light color over light, or dark over light:

Coverage needed: 140 sq. ft. + 50 sq. ft. (1/3) = 190 sq. ft.

(2)  To paint light color over darker, or over wallcovering:

Coverage needed: 280 sq. ft. (double sq. ft) + 140 sq. ft. (1/2) = 420 sq. ft.

B.  Molding or trim: Measure running length (linear feet). 3 lin. ft. = 1 sq. ft. wall space.

C.  At the paint store, read the label on the pain can that you plan to purchase. Look for “Covers” or “Coverage.” Compare to your estimate, also the type of area you’re painting.

 

3. How to set up the area to be painted.

 

A.  Protecting floor, carpet or tile with dropcloths or old sheeting.

B.  Moving furniture, lamps, plants out of way; cover with dropcloths or sheeting.

C.  Using masking paper and tape to protect windows, trim, brick/marble, special surfaces.

 

4. How to prepare – “prep” a surface to be refinished.

 

A.  Covering and protecting adjacent surfaces and areas with masking paper and tape.

B.  Selecting products based on surface/“substrate.”       See No. 1 above.

C.  Considering surface damage amount and type – eg. scratches, gouges, holes, cracks.

D.  Choosing caulking product. Running smooth, full beads with caulking gun.

E.  Repairing small gouge in the wall – product and tool(s) to use.

F.  Filling holes, cracks, etc. How much product to use?

G.  Using a putty knife to smooth filler even with the surface

H.  Holding/grasping tool for maximum control and flexibility; making right strokes.

 

5. How to apply a primer paint on a new surface, before finish coating.

 

A.  Selecting primer product and color suitable to finishes- white, tan, gray, black.

B.  Applying spray primer versus primer from a can. Which to use when?

C.  Painting up and down? In same direction? Back and forth? At an angle?

D.  Taking short, light strokes, or long strokes? Or, plastering it on?

E.  Waiting between coats, if one coat does not cover. How long?

F.  Finishing “prep” area, so the finish coat will adhere well – and last.

 

6. How to apply a finish coat of paint.

 

A.  Checking paint in can for lumps, clumps, paint strings, etc. Mixing paint again.

B.   Testing can of spray paint for flow, consistency, viscosity.

C.   Selecting brush(es): nylon/polyester bristle, China bristle, etc. (Many choices!)

(1)  Bristle width that will fit area: 2-inch, 2 ½-inch, 3-inch, 4-inch.

(2)  Bristle edge that fits surface: squared, curved, angled, sharp corner, dipped.

(3)  Brush handle length and “gripper” that you can manage.

(4)  Checking for loose or worn bristles in brush – used and new ones.

D.  Selecting rollers: Short or long handle; narrow, middie, or wider base roller.

E.  Choosing cover and nap type, density. Basing on product and surface traits. See No. 1.

(1)  Cover nap: New rollers before buying; used rollers before using again.

(2)  Brushing/rolling methods: Suit to surface, area size/layout, product, drying time.

F.  Cleaning up as-you-paint: spills, drips, splotches, trails, etc.

**  Note: Using a spray gun system calls for a completely different set of skills, abilities and savvy.

 

7. How to prep a used surface for re-painting.

 

A.  Washing all old surfaces first.

B.  Fully sanding, caulking and patching surface/area as needed.

C.  Applying primer, or first coat of the finish product.

 

8. How to re-paint a previously painted surface.

 

A.  Assessing condition of the surface – and area.

B.  Lightly sanding, also caulking and spackling imperfections in, the surface.

C.  Selecting and using roller cover with a nap size similar to the one used before.

** TIP: Looking at roller “stipple” (pattern left on surface before) to determine size used.

D.  Brushing: Using long strokes, and laying paint on evenly.

E.  Rolling: Using uniform motion; slightly overlapping each previous edge (stroke).

 

9. How to prep a used surface for re-finishing – eg. varnished wood.

 

A.  For painting:

(1)   Completely sanding surface to dull existing finish.

(2)  Wiping down surface with liquid sandpaper, or rubbing alcohol.

B.  For staining:

(1)  Using different color: Removing clear finish with paint stripper. Then, sanding surface in multiple stages.

(2)  Removing darker color before staining with lighter color. Doing what’s needed.

(3)  Protecting the wood’s integrity. Doing your best.

(4)  Be careful – and patient!

 

10. How to stain and seal a new wood surface.

 

A.  Choosing stain product: Depends on extent – size and complexity – of project.

B.  Sanding lightly. Making certain that all marks or discolorations are sanded out.

C.  Applying stain heavily to surface. Using rags, cotton towel, or sponge.

D.  Letting stain soak in.

E.  Waiting till the stain feels slightly “tacky” – sticky.

F.  Applying sealer with a brush, roller or spray gun.

 

11. How to varnish or finish coat a new wood surface.

 

A.  Using spray finishing system for optimum finish.

B.  Spraying multiple thin coats, rather than one heavy coat.

C.  Letting solvent evaporate before applying second coat of finish. A MUST!

 

Whatever information or tips you glean from your hotel/facility painter is really up to YOU.
Fact-finding TIPS:
1. Be specific. Tell your painter about the project: room/area; layout, approximate square footage; type of surface/”substrate,” surface age and condition; area’s main uses; budget.

2. Be honest. Tell your painter who will be doing the work. Will it be YOU? Let him or her know what painting, refinishing, and/ or papering projects you’ve done. How did they turn out?

 * * * * * * * * * * * * 

Read Part 2: “Every Hotel’s/Facility’s Team Member Can Learn Something from Its Painter”

Wallcovering Tips; Special Things to Look For; Questions to Ask, and Not Ask, Your Painter.”

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Have a “fresh outlook-ing” day. Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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