Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

There’s one way to operate a hotel or facility paint shop. That is with a set of easy-to-follow policies and guidelines (vs. rules) that fit the engineering department – and the organization.

The shop size can total one wall with a few shelves, a large room with a separate workshop area, or an entire small building, or shed. The rules will be the same, basically.

 

Some PAINT SHOP basics: JUST DO IT!

 

JUST DO IT: Keep shop neat. Picked up. Swept up.

JUST DO IT: Keep shop floor clean, and clear of parts, tools; spills, piles of anything, garbage.

JUST DO IT: Keep workshop clean, swept up and ready for next project.

JUST DO IT: Put things away – and in their proper places – when you’re finished with them.

DON’T DO IT: No “borrowing” of paint shop/engineering/company property for personal use.

DON’T DO IT: No “loaning” or “giving” of paint shop/engineering property to other departments – unless your supervisor authorizes. TIP: Get a written authorization.

 

1. Set up a Sign-out and Sign-in system for all paint shop property.

 

2. Put up a Paint Shop bulletin board. Post inventory list, requisition list, FYIs, cartoons, etc. TIP: And, keep those lists updated!

 

3. Tightly close all cans, bottles, tubes, boxes, bags, containers, etc.

 

4. Thoroughly clean all tools before storing back on the shelf, in the cupboard, in kiosk, etc.

 

5. Clean equipment; and make a note of any repairs needed, before returning to its proper storage area(s).

 

A. Flush out spray gun spray lines. Clean nozzles, tips, hoses, product containers, etc.

B. Soak and clean spray guns to prevent sticking, clogging, damage to mechanisms.

C. Empty out any unused product from container; place in storage container for recycling – eg. paint, polyurethane, chemical treatment.

D. Wash out each container with appropriate cleaning agent. Let dry.

 

6. Do basic repairs and maintenance on tools and equipment before storing.

 

7. Store products and materials appropriately and safely. Follow MSDS, UBC, HAZMAT, EPA codes.

 

A. All cans, spray cans, bottles, boxes, tubs: Upright.

B. Wallcovering rolls, boxes: Upright.All tubes – eg. paint, tinting.

 

8. Store all tools and equipment in a safe manner.

 

A. Brushes: Bristles up (no cover); bristles upright (sturdy cover); bristles down (in “wet-storage” brush container).

B. Roller covers: on end, to maintain nap integrity.

C. Electrical tools: Turn to “OFF” position before re-shelving, re-storing.

D. Mechanical tools: Close/fold up handles and levers before re-shelving or re-storing.

E. Saw blades, sharp edges: Remove, retract, or cover. Store in visible spot of toolbox/cabinet.

F. Sharp objects, scissors: Close up; place with handles up, or facing YOU.

G. Razor blades: Retract into holders/handles; or store individually in closed, marked box.

 

9. Store nuts, bolts, washers, screws, etc. in plastic organizer boxes – or small plastic/metal containers.

 

10. Store small tools in divided tool chest, toolbox, small carry-all, unbreakable containers.

 

11. Store like products together, like materials together, like tools together, etc.

 

12. Store all products, materials, supplies, tools, and equipment in dry, safe places.

 

13. Keep records of inventory use, loss, breakage, disrepair, “retirement,” etc.

 

14. Regularly, post a list of items that (a) are running low, (b) need to be requisitioned – and when, (c) need to be RUSH ordered, (d) are no longer used or kept in stock.

 

15. Post in visible spot a running list of your requisitioned items. Keep track of requisition and order status. Display date of order.

 

16. Requisition basic supplies before you get low. Keep checking with supervisor and/or purchasing manager about their order and delivery status.

 

17. Be cost-conscious and budget-time aware in selecting and ordering products, materials, supplies, new tools, etc.

 

18. Know which products, materials, supplies, etc. cannot be compromised – quality and durability versus cost.

 

19. Keep accurate records. Neat, complete, easy-to-understand, easy-to-use.

 

20. Discard products and materials that are no longer usable – dried up, discolored, faded, damaged (mold, mildew, water, sun); frayed, bug-infested.

 

** TIP: Fill partially full containers of paint, stain, varnish, etc. with sand, or other absorbent.

 

21. Discard products, materials, supplies, etc. that do not meet product standards and safety codes. WHY: Regulators and inspectors are watching. Too, people can get very ill.

 

22. Promptly discard damaged or broken tools and equipment that cannot be repaired – and are too dangerous to use in present condition. WHY: FIRE and SAFETY hazards.

 

23. Discard used rags, paper towels, etc. – especially those with strong odors, fumes, residue.

** TIP: Soak rags in soapy water to neutralize combustibility or flammability.

 

24. Report problems promptly to your supervisor, and to teammates. Keep everyone informed!

 

25. Promptly report losses, damages, and thefts of products, materials, supplies, tools, equipment.

WHY: It’s company policy! Also, some items may need to be replaced a.s.a.p.

 

Comply with the safety rules on an ongoing basis. It’s the best way to prevent accidents in your paint shop.

Establish policies and guidelines that are DO-ABLE.  Establishing that policy and practice helps all of your teammates – especially engineering/facility – keep the paint shop looking good, and working great! For everyone!

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Thank you for visiting “Painting  with Bob.”

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