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Archive for December, 2014

A Painter’s View: The Collector’s 7,000 – and Home of Fine Woods!

At my first-ever “yard sale,” I sold an original soundtrack album of Star Wars I, to a major collector. As a result, the Central Florida man invited me to his home. It had been designed, specifically, to display, and preserve the integrity of, the amazing collection of “sci-fi, adventure and fantasy-themed pieces.”

 

Included in the collection were soundtrack albums, DVDs, CDs, videos; ad posters, banners and trailers; autographed photos, letters and books; costumes, masks, make-up kits, and props; pens and paperweights; plates, mugs and trays; toys, dolls and games; jackets, t-shirts, caps, and jewelry; paintings, drawings, sketches; set and scene models. Even a vehicle.

 

The 7,000 plus piece collection “lived” in a climate-environment controlled atmosphere. Marble, natural woods, glass, and special plexiglass were used extensively. Commercial wall vinyls covered non-wood areas such as closets, pantry and storage. Metals such as brass and chrome were seen in few areas.

 

What captivated me most was the hardwoods and veneers used throughout the home. A tasteful, colorful blending of temperate and tropical hardwoods, as well as a few softwoods.

 

“R”, the engineering department’s assistant supervisor at the Seralago Hotel & Suites, would have gone speechless. A carpenter craftsman and finisher, he would have been fascinated with the selection, combination, and use of the various woods.

 

The hardwoods and veneers carried your eye from room-to-room, and area-to-area, in a smooth and effortless way. Master woodcrafter at work. Paneling, built-in shelves and cases; cabinetry and cutting blocks; general and decorative mouldings, trims and joinings; doors and frames, windows and trims; flooring; furniture, work stations, picture frames, etc.

 

Here is a list of the woods used. For non-wood craftsmen and wood loving readers of this blog, I’ve tried to include a brief description for each:

 

TEMPERATE HARDWOODS

 

1. Ash (white) – Colors: Pale honey. Properties: Good working and bending, fine finish.

2. Beech – Colors: Pale brown, flecked. Properties: Hard, good working, finish.

3. Oak (European) – Colors: Pale/Dark brown, with growth rings and silver rays. Properties: Hard to work, strong, durable.

4. Elm (European) – Colors: Brown, with twisted grain. Properties: Attractive, hard to work.

5. Sycamore (American) – Colors: Light brown, with straight grain-lacewood.

6. Black Walnut (Virginia Walnut) – Colors: Dark brown, with purple tints. Properties: Coarse grain.

 

TROPICAL HARDWOODS

 

1. Rosewood (Brazilian) – Colors: Dark brown, with variegated streaks. Properties: Attractive. Use: Veneering. Note: Product now banned from international trade.

2. Cedar (Brazilian) – Colors: Dark to Mahogany-colored heartwood. Properties: durable, resinous.

3. Cocobolo (Nicaragua Rosewood) – Colors: Dark brown, with colorful streaks. Properties: Tough, dense, lustrous.

4. Kingwood – Colors: Brown to Violet, even-textured, variegated. Properties: Lustrous. Uses: Turning, veneers.

5. Mahogany (Brazilian) – Colors: Light to dark reddish brown, with straight/even grain. Properties: Stable, good finish.

 

VENEERS

 

1. Walnut – Colors: Grayish to dark brown, with dark streaks and tints (eg. purple), wavy-grains. Uses: Veneering, Burring

2. Pommelle-grained – Colors: Dark brown. Uses: Veneering.

3. Birds-eye Maple-grained – Colors: Light yellow/tan. Uses: Veneering.

 

SOFTWOODS

 

1. Douglas Fir – Colors: Yellow to Pink brown. Properties: Coarse, dense, durable.

2. Ponderosa Pine – Colors: Yellow white, with delicate figure. Properties: Sable, excellent finish.

3. Scots Pine – Colors: Pink-Red heartwood. Properties: Resinous.

 

Comparatively few homes will feature so many woods under one roof. For it to work, everyone involved in the design-engineering-build-decoration-finishing process must be on the same page.

 

They must know the customer well. What he or she says and points out – and what is left out, accidentally or intentionally.

 

They must know woods. Each one’s unique color, tints, grain, streaks. Each one’s unique properties and characteristics. Each one’s uses, and limitations.

 

Then, every specialist, and every craftsperson, must cooperate and collaborate from pre-Phase 1 to post-Phase 10/20/whatever. Until way after the complete project is done.

 

I would have loved to be the finisher/painter/decorator that worked on the collector’s home. Many aspects of the project would have offered immense opportunities in fine wood preparation and finishing. I’ve worked on a few similar properties. A maximum of seven types of woods, excluding furniture, were installed.

 

Whatever you collect…whatever size your home may be, invite fine wood into your life.

 

Even a little wood will do wonders for your living style, your spirit, and your soul!

  

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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Painting It: Fences and Gates

As an element of security, and privacy to your property, a fence can be a welcome addition in the design of your landscape. An important part of its function is the aesthetics and durability which make the fence interesting to see, and to hold up under various environmental conditions.

 

What type of fence is on your property? Do you tell yourself it’s an eyesore, or that it’s not important enough to warrant your attention? Or, is that fence an essential part of your garden or landscaping, where you want to give it the attention it deserves?

 

If you choose to make your fence an integral part of your property’s appeal, then you’re going to have to take the proper steps to maintain it the best that you can.

 

Here are my recommendations:

 

1. Whether the fence is constructed of wood, metal or plastic, each requires similar methods – also considered steps – of preparation before painting can begin.

 

A. Pressure washing. First Step; all surfaces. “Comprehensively” removes all unwanted debris; including dirt, rust stains, fungus, and molds.

B. Abrasive cleaning. Second Step. “Optional,” based on present smoothness and sheen of the surface. Ultra smooth surfaces benefit greatly by a sanding process.

C. Adhesion promoter. Third Step. “Optimum” chemical treatment for smooth surfaces which greatly enhances the bonding of paint finishes.

D. Standard latex and oil based multi surface primers. Fourth Step. ”The Closest Guarantee;” creates a durable bond between the fence material and the finish paint.

E. Specialized use primers. Only if required. “For Difficult Substrates:” Galvanized, Non-Ferrous metals use (acid wash primers, galvanizing primers, zinc primers, etc.)

 

2. Types of paint finishes which can be applied that promote durability and color retention.

 

A. Wood Fences

1. Use an exterior latex or oil based primer, followed by an exterior acrylic latex paint finish or an oil based finish.

2. Apply an exterior semitransparent or solid color stain.

 

B. Metal Fences

1. If necessary, apply the appropriate primer as described above.

2. For optimum durability, apply a 2 component urethane or lacquer.

3. For general appearance, apply an exterior oil based finish or an industrial direct to metal coating.

 

C. Plastic Fences

1. Normally, they are not painted, due the flexibility of the material.

 2. Consult a paint distributor for advice if you must undertake such a project.

 3. As a professional I would not recommend it. It may look good initially; yet after a short time, the paint may begin to peel.

 

IMPORTANT NOTE: Spray painting is the most effective method for painting any fence. It is efficient productive, cost effective and labor saving.

 

In closing, a fence for many is a major undertaking; maybe even daunting. Properly prepared and finish painted, your fence will look good and the finish will endure over time.

 

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End your old year with thanks! Begin your New Year with thanks, too!

Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Painting It: Upcoming Mini Blogs for Hotel and Facility Painters

 

1. Fences and Gates

 

A. Cleaning Agents

B. Prepping: Metal/anodized tubing vs.

C. Coatings: Low cost, low coverage, low durability vs. higher cost, much greater coverage, superb durability!

 

2. Skylights

 

A. Temperature variations

B. Surfaces

C. Atmosphere – eg. air

D. Problems: Leaks, paint cracks, mold/mildew, moisture

E. Preps

F. Paints/coatings – eg. durable oil-based

 

3. KidSuites and Children’s Rooms

 

A. Designs/themes that kids wants

B. Fun atmospheres

C. Colors appealing to kids

 

4. Children’s Play and Activity Areas

 

A. Designs using animation, cartoons, surreal images

B. Pastel paint colors

 

5. Game Rooms

 

A. Wall colors conducive to activity – not distracting

B. Special effects

C. Simulations

 

6. Teen Clubs and Computer Rooms

 

A. Colors that teens want

B. Special effects

C. Very TECH-Y

 

7. Front Desk and Reception Areas

 

A. First impression of hotel – and people that work there

B. Unique  applications, products, colors, effects

C. Hotel theme colors

 

8. Lobbies and Concierge Centers

 

A. High-end applications – eg. high-quality wallcoverings

B. Decorative finishes

C. Custom materials, textures, colors

D. Consistent finishes, colors throughout areas

 

 9. Guest Connectivity and Communication Centers

 

A. HIGH-LIGHT colors

B. Accent walls

 

10. Indoor and Outdoor Gardens and Rest Areas

 

A. Colors best suited – Complementary-to-au naturale

B. Walking trails – Colors of paint/stain and varnish on benches, signage,etc.

C. Seating areas – Paint vs. wood stains and varnishes

 

11. Pool and Spa Areas

 

A. Problems: High-moisture, high-exposure, high-sun

B. Paint colors

C. Paint types: Oil-based vs. epoxy

D. Gazebo – Colors, tints, special effects, “blend-ins,” etc.

E. Pool Huts – Colors, textures, accents, reflectives

 

12. Outdoor Recreation and Sports Areas

 

A. Special needs: lines, symbols, signage, striping

B. Durability  and environmental exposure

C. Graphics and “planned graffiti”

D. Special colors/blends

 

13. Restaurants, Clubs and Pubs

 

A. Creating atmosphere using color, texture, “overlays,” etc.

B. Murals and scenic

C. Complementing other elements, surfaces, finishes

D. Themes

E. Cozy and relaxing vs. earthy vs. energetic vs. romantic vs. pure luxury!

 

 

14. Food Courts and Snack Bars
A. Colors – Brights, subtle touches

B. Graphic designs

C. Geometrics

D. Illustrations

 

 

15. Theatres and Entertainment Areas

 

A. Colors that complement

B. Low-dim-dark lighting ranges

C. Wall carpeting

D. Problems with paints

E. Wood finishing

F. Toning down other surfaces – eg. chrome, fabric, flooring

Painting In and Dining en Glass

Recently, I sat around a glass-top dining table with five ladies. All were retired, but hardly sitting around nursing their arthritic joints and less than 20/20 vision.

 

Among the group were three career educators and education writers, a corporate office administrator, a writer/editor/consultant, and me: a painter and decorator.

 

Each lady present was well-educated, traveled, articulate, and opinionated. Did I mention also that each lady was hilarious!

 

They’d lived in well-known places like New York City, Manhattan, Village, Bronx; Chicago; Boston, Martha’s Vineyard; New Jersey; Washington, D.C.; Miami Beach, and Fort Lauderdale. They’d lived in less common places, too – eg. the Caribbean, London, Athens, Sicily, Pakistan.

 

We discussed everything, from writing and publishing fiction…to political and social unrest…to police protection and brutality…to employer-employee law…to gourmet cooking and restaurant eating…to eating healthy, and for fun…to dementia, Alzheimer’s and Parkinsons…to auto design and mechanics…to fashion design and men’s clothing styles…to fine art and folk art. (What did I leave out, Ladies?)

 

We even hit upon interior design, restorations and painting. We even covered how to repair and reinstall front door latches and knobs.

 

We were supposed to eat at 2 pm. By the time that we enjoyed our Pear Sparkling Water, cheese spreads, and variety of crackers – and got to the table, it was nearly 4 pm.

 

No problem!  All of us were having a great time! Including the hostess!  Including me, the only person there that was male, and far from retirement age.

 

Why bring this encounter with the aging up at all?

 

If you want to take a crash course in a lot of subjects, accept an invitation to dine with a group of your elders.

 

If you live far away from your own parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, etc. – or they’re deceased – fill in with the elders wherever you are planted!

 

“Go ahead!  Make their day!”   Go ahead!  Make your day, too!

 

Postscript: By the way, the family secrets are safe!  If you’re a teen-to-middle aged relative of one of these fine, dynamic women, breathe easy!  Your 21st Century matriarch of the family – mother/grandmother, aunt/great aunt, cousin  – is savvy about protecting your – and her own – privacy!

 

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Many thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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Painting with “SYMPHONY SAM”

STRADIVARIUS
My mother told me recently about “Symphony Sam.” That’s the name she gave the homeless man that played virtuoso-quality music with his violin, in Chicago’s Pedway. And, he handed out free copies of the official Vietnam Veterans of America newspaper.

 

She met him one morning, in the Pedway between Randolph Street and Michigan Avenue, and S. LaSalle Street. She took the underground walkway, when Chicago’s temperature dropped to the 30s (wind chill factor 20 degrees or lower), and freezing winds bit into one’s cheeks.

 

“Symphony Sam” was a Vietnam Veteran. He suffered from PTSD, the debilitating effects of Agent Orange, relentless pain from the shrapnel still in his back and legs, and major depression. He always wore “a frayed, dark blue suit” when he played in the Pedway. And, a “subtle smile of absolute acceptance.”

 

Prior to serving three tours of duty with the U. S. Marines, “Symphony Sam” taught music at Julliard. Also he played Second Violin, part-time, with the New York Philharmonic, and violin in the orchestra of an on-Broadway theatre.

 

WHAT DOES “Symphony Sam” HAVE TO DO WITH PAINTING?

 

After “Symphony Sam” was released from the military hospital in Japan, he returned to the United States. The only job he could get was painting sublet apartments for a New York City real estate company. He lived with a fellow Vietnam Veteran and his wife, in a small, three bedroom flat.

 

One Christmas, he ended up on a Greyhound Bus, as it pulled into the main terminal, in downtown Chicago. He told my mother that he never remembered buying a ticket, and getting on that bus.

 

He said that he checked into a cheap, but clean hotel on Randolph Street. He carried a few clothes in a small suitcase, and his Stradivarius violin. No painting tools.

 

The hotel’s manager helped “Symphony Sam” get little painting jobs at other small hotels, located in the Loop.

 

One night, he suffered a severe PTSD episode. He said that he’d been fortunate. All of his previous attacks, in New York and Chicago, had been mild ones. He ended up in Michael Reese Hospital on the South Side.

 

Since then, he’d been unable to work regularly. When he had enough money to get by, he stayed at that cheap hotel, managed by the friendly Sicilian. Usually, though, he “lived underneath the city…with a few friends…also Vietnam Vets.”

 

My mother saw “Symphony Sam” for the last time in 1989. The week before Christmas. “He wore a newer, used suit, and a pair of polished black boots,” she told me.

 

He told her that he had been living back at the hotel. He worked part-time doing repairs and painting for “a list of steady customers.” He called them “small hotel people.”

 

“Symphony Sam” seemed content,” Mom told me. But, her eyes told me a different story. A major concern of hers, over twenty-five years later.

 

Did “Symphony Sam” make it? For how long? In 1989, when she saw him last, he was over 55. PTSD and Agent Orange’s lung effects had become less manageable. Several common medical conditions had set in. “His newer suit hung on his frame, always very bony,” my mother recalled. “His eyes an eerie tornado green. . .”

 

“Florida has ‘Symphony Sams,’ too,” said my mother recently. On “FLASHPOINT,” two Central Florida homeless coalition officials were describing the modern housing facility to be built for the homeless in the area. A plea was made for major capital support from corporations.

 

What about the “foreclosure-bound” hotel that a church congregation and volunteers converted into studio efficiencies for the local homeless? (“Painting It: A Multi-Family ‘Home for the Homeless,” posted December 11-12, 2014.)

 

What about the abandoned mansion, turned into a transitional residence for the homeless? (Watch for: “Painting It: Existing Home for the Homeless,” to be posted December 23-24.)

 

What about “Symphony Sam?”

 

“I would offer these people a much quicker solution.” I told relatives during Thanksgiving.

 

“Constructing a new structure – a large transitional housing facility, for millions of dollars – could take a couple of years,” I explained. “The groups involved in the Central Florida project – facility – haven’t even selected the land yet.”

 

Here’s one proposal to help people like “Symphony Sam” have a safe, clean home – and a chance at a better life.

 

  1. Rescue a few smaller hotels and motels along U. S. Highway 192. The ones plagued by low occupancy rates, disrepair and damage, and the threat of foreclosure.
  2. Repair them. Reconfigure their rooms and public areas. Set up a central dining area for the homeless residents.
  3. Recruit homeless persons, who once worked as skilled construction workers. Put them to work. They can help in making certain repairs and reconfiguring the rooms and common (public) areas. Give them a chance to regain some of their dignity. Their basic skills, like riding a bike or typing, will come back to them.
  4. Offer these workers future housing there, when the property opens for occupancy.
  5. Give the homeless residents a good reason to take care of their respective room, and the overall property.
  6. Keep the housing as simple and practical as possible. Recycle whatever furniture, desks, fixtures, appliances, window treatments, kitchen ware, dishes, etc. that are in good condition. Repaint, re-stain and refinish all surfaces.

 

By the way, expensive wallcoverings, flooring, furniture, and state-of-the-art systems are unnecessary. Research and reports about homeless shelter accommodations show that “pricier” amenities tend to make persons just off the streets nervous, self-conscious, apprehensive, distrustful, and even ill.

 

Every community has a “Symphony Sam.” A person who still possesses the skills and abilities, the passion, and the interest to give back! To get off the street! To once again become a more productive part of the universe.

 

Every community has do-able options to meet the dire housing needs of the homeless. Every community has at least one existing multi-unit property, that can be converted in a time-cost-manpower efficient manner.

 

Our local hotel GMs and their staffs can do only so much. They can help only so much. Their resources are very limited. Their ability to use their properties – which they do not own – is very, very limited.

 

What needs to happen to provide safe and clean housing for the “Symphony Sams” in our respective communities? To get this job done sooner than two to three years after they become statistics?

 

Local entities such as the Central Florida Coalition on Homeless and Central Florida Foundation (http://www.cffound.org) are proactive, and motivated.

 

Special projects such as the “Reconstruction of Housing for the Homeless in America Project” focus on providing safe housing promptly.

 

Professional and trade projects like the AIA’s new redesign/rebuild internship project tap young talent. Among other things, they offer fresh, new approaches to “reconfiguring and retrofitting” solid existing structures into great multi-occupancy housing.

 

What is your community doing to get your homeless adults and children, into safe and clean housing?

 

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“Best wishes for a healthy, safe and peaceful holiday season – and Year 2015.”

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

 

Painting In: Company Policy, Common Sense, and Common Courtesy: Part 2

Scenario No. 1: A regular hotel guest reports that the paint color used to touch up in his room does not match the rest of the wall. He wants the entire wall repainted immediately. It’s after 3 pm on Day 4 of a 7-night stay. He declines management’s offer to move him to a different room, and “comp” him for one night’s stay.

 

Company Policy: Have the painter inspect the area, and repaint the wall when the guest will be gone for the day.

 

Common Sense: Painter tries to arrange to repaint the wall, when the guest will be out of the room for at least four (4) hours, to allow the fresh paint fumes to dissipate.

 

Common Courtesy: Painter talks, one-on-one, with the guest and explains that the hotel values his patronage. The painter emphasizes the importance of repainting the wall, when it’s safest for the guest.

 

 

 

Scenario No. 2: A guest calls the front desk, and reports multiple large black mold buildups in the bathroom. Rooms Manager offers to move the guest to another room. The guest declines.

 

Company Policy: A housekeeping supervisor assesses the extent of major black mold buildup. She calls the painter to clean up/remove the mold.

 

Common Sense: Painter uses mild soap and warm water mixture to reduce the level of buildup, and the guest’s exposure to mold spores. The standard chemical bleach solution is not used, to prevent the guest from suffering an adverse reaction to dangerous bleach fumes.

 

Common Courtesy: Inform the guest that the mild soap/warm water mixture is a temporary, partial solution. Explain that treatment with the more effective bleach solution requires that the room remain unoccupied for at three (3) hours. HEALTH TIP: Place a fan in the room to increase ventilation, and air flow.

 

 

Scenario No. 3: The painter finds a guest crying, because she has been locked out of her room. He hears young children crying inside. He tries the key card; it does not work. He learns that the guest owes back rent for the room.

 

Company Policy: The guest/mother must go to the front office and make payment arrangements. Then the guest will be allowed access into the room.

 

Common Sense: Painter calls the head of security, to get help for the children a.s.a.p. Painter uses master key card to open the room door. He lets the mother stand in the doorway, and check that her children are safe. Then, he has the guest/mother step back outside. He re-closes and relocks the door.

 

Common Courtesy: Painter gets permission and assists the guest/mother in getting promptly to the front office, to make payment arrangements. A security officer stands guard outside the guest’s room, to ensure the safety of the children inside.

 

 

Scenario No. 4: A customer changes his mind about the paint colors, just applied inside his new martial arts studio. He tries to reject the job, and refuses to pay. He insists that the painters redo the entire job (over 1800 square feet), in time for his grand opening four days away.

 

Company Policy: (1) Payment in full is due when the paint job is completed, per the terms of the contract. (2) The customer rejected paint job because he changed his mind, not because of any problem with the products and/or workmanship. (3) The “redo” is considered a new paint job. It must be contracted separately, and scheduled at the convenience of both the contractor and customer.

 

Common Sense: Talk one-on-one with the customer. Find out what’s really bothering him. Does he have the money to pay for the job completed? Did he, or someone else, select the original color scheme? Regardless: Require payment in full of customer’s bill.

 

Common Courtesy: (1) Offer customer a small cost break for paint job no. 1, if payment in full received within twenty-four hours. (2) If possible, offer to redo the front part of studio in time for the grand opening, using the new colors. Terms: Signed contract for the new paint job, at least one-half prepayment for labor, purchase and delivery, in 24-hours, of all products and materials responsibility of customer.

 

Scenario No. 5: Exterior paint, applied one week ago, peels off the surface in rain. Commercial customer is upset. (The painters: “Us, too!”)

 

Company Policy: Call in paint manufacturer’s rep to inspect, and analyze. Nothing wrong found with the paint. Nothing wrong found with the substrate, surface’s preparation, or paint application by the painters. Strike agreement with paint manufacturer: They pay for new prep and finish products, also re-rental of required equipment – eg. hydraulics.

 

Common Sense: Report to paint manufacturer’s rep all concerns about product (s), and use.

TIP: Check all products, materials, tools, and equipment used for cleaning, removing, prepping.

 

Common Courtesy: Put customer’s final payment on hold till the job is redone. If possible, offer customer a nominal cost break on the whole job. TIP: Do not take the bulk of cost cut out of labor part.

 

Painting In, through, with, or in spite of company policy, common sense, and/or common courtesy challenges is part of the job. And, more often than not, it must be played by ear. Each time around.

 

With experience comes greater perceptivity, clearer understanding, more creativity, and deeper wisdom.

 

By the way, it might well be that youthe painter – are the more perceptive, understanding, creative, and wiser one when it comes to doing your painting job right!

 

 

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Follow through! Stay true to your own high standards and work ethic!

Thank  you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

 

 

Painting In: Company Policy, Common Sense and Common Courtesy: Part 1

Scenario:
A person – let’s say a painter – leaves his or her employment with a company.

 

Whatever the circumstance, it is standard company policy for any former employee to separate physically from the business, organization, people there, and property.

 

It is standard company policy that a former employee not return onto the property except:

 

  1. for a business reason that requires their physical return;
  2. for an occasional, brief visit – one to two times a year maximum;
  3. by invitation – eg. for a departmental party or cook-out;
  4. to “apply in person” for a job opening;
  5. for a job interview;
  6. to return – a rehire – to work there.

 

 

By the way, any and all returns should be cleared, in advance, with the hotel or facility general manager, or front office. That’s called “respect” or “common courtesy.”

 

It is common sense for a former employee to stay away from the business, organization and people. That gives everyone involved the time and space needed to:

 

  1. yes, mourn the departed employee’s loss;
  2. accept the person’s absence from the team, and the group; and
  3. adjust to the changes necessary because of the person’s departure from the organization.

 

It is common courtesy for a former employee to remain off the property, and away from the organization, except for any of the six reasons given above. This gives the replacement the best opportunity possible to assimilate into his or her new position.

 

He or she needs, and deserves, the opportunity to succeed. The replacement – new employee – has a job to do there.

 

  1. He or she needs to learn the ropes within the department, also interdepartmentally and organizationally.
  2. He or she needs to adjust and tweak his or her skills, abilities and resources to meet the unique needs of the new property – and employer.
  3. He or she needs to be welcomed properly by his new teammates and bosses.
  4. He or she needs to find his or her place on the team, and how to fit in!
  5. He or she needs to establish a reliable communication and negotiation system with his or her supervisor, other department directors, and managers.
  6. He or she needs to build teammate relationships and organizational friendships – at all levels – that are mutually beneficial, supportive and gratifying.
  7. He or she needs to find unique ways to contribute to the organization and the business.
  8. He or she needs to participate in and belong to the company family.

 

 

When a former employee stays off the property, and stays separated from the company, he or she benefits, too. He or she has the best opportunity to succeed autonomously.

 

  1. He or she can mourn the job loss, with the attention and respect it deserves.
  2. He or she can look back and gain a clear perspective of his or her total employment experience – and work life – there.
  3. He or she can reflect, objectively and subjectively, on past achievements, contributions and also unmet goals.
  4. He or she can rest in the present, and both assess and appreciate his current skills and abilities, accrued knowledge, creative talents, aspirations, and place in the world of employability.
  5. He or she can plan for the future. The person can create a plan that (a) respects that person’s work ethic and set of values; (b) offers opportunities for changes, growth and doing well; and (c) fulfills the greater need to feel like the person fits in and belongs, contributes, and can do more good.

 

When my grandfather retired from the ministry, he left a parish where he and my grandmother were totally respected, and deeply loved. In leaving, he announced to the consistory and congregation that he and Grandmother would be “staying away” from the church parish for one full year. Why?

 

“To give the new man a chance,” he explained to everyone concerned. (And, others that asked!)

 

Grandfather knew that it would be a major challenge for the successor to fill his pastoral shoes. He knew that it would be a bigger challenge for “the new man” to establish his own place – his own identity – in the church and in the community. To fit in and to belong!

 

Grandfather kept his pledge, and promise. Yes, he and Grandmother maintained their closest personal friendships with a few individuals and couples in the church. (They had retired there, their home community for over 25 years.)

 

Still, they refrained from having any communications and activities that may have, even indirectly, made “life uncomfortable and difficult for the new man.”

 

As a result, the new man sought Grandfather’s counsel on a regular basis. And, the two clergy became trusted friends, strong supporters of each other, and professional confidantes.

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

POINTS TO PONDER:

1. Have you ever been a “former employee?” Did you follow standard company policy after your departure?

2. Did you exercise common sense about your former employer, teammates/coworkers, and organization – and their circumstance?

3. Did you practice common courtesy toward your former teammates/coworkers, former managers, and former employer, as well as your replacement?

4. Have you ever been working where and when a former employee showed up repeatedly on the property?  For years? How did you handle the situation each time?

5. How well was the company policy, including security rules, followed by all current employees and managers, including you? By the former employee? By the business owners?

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

“In the long haul, it pays to follow company policy, exercise common sense, and practice common courtesy – and help others do the same.”

Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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