Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

“Ruth” could be found, nearly every day, on a computer at the local library. She caught up with the state, national and world news. She read authoritative articles and blogs on health/medicine, nutrition, fitness; business, politics, government; education; culture; environment; animals.

 

She kept up to date on happenings back in California. She applied for jobs in private transportation. She played online brain teasers, Solitaire, and action games.

 

She was intelligent, curious, and friendly. She dressed neatly, and always smelled like roses, lavender, or French vanilla. Her full, curly black hair enveloped her full, glowing face.

 

“Ruth” was homeless. Ordinarily, she lived at the back of a nearby closed-up gas/convenience business. When the temperature dropped to the 30s, she went to the Methodist Church’s shelter four blocks away.

 

One of her friends, “Angie,” pulled a small luggage cart in and out of the library. It was loaded with a 14.5+ inch screen HP laptop computer in a black satchel, a black accordion file case full of papers, and a large handbag with an app-loaded cell phone inside.

 

She plugged her computer into the library’s WI-FI power plug. Then, she conducted online research. She wrote poignant letters to the editors of newspapers around the U. S.  She emailed government officials, congressional subcommittees, and non-profit leaders about societal, employment, economic, and health legislation and imbalances. Discreetly, she snacked from a pocket-sized re-sealable plastic bag.

 

“Angie” was homeless. She was also a former Fortune 500 businesswoman.

 

Certain Methodist Church parishioners kept an eye out for both women. They made certain that “Ruth” and “Angie” had a safe, hygienic and warm place to shampoo their hair, and bathe regularly. A place to launder their clothes. Ways to live “in mormalcy,” as Ruth put it. For a little while, anyway. Between Ruth’s and Angie’s usual street lives.

 

For the homeless, having a “place to live” is an urgent necessity. And, it is the moral responsibility of the rest of us to help those with such dire needs.

 

How do we provide a home for our homeless?

 

ONE SOLUTION:

 

A few communities – eg. Central Florida – are forming collaborative commissions, agencies, foundations, etc. They address what Andrea Bailey, CEO, Central Florida Commission on Homelessness, calls “chronic homelessness.”

 

Focus emphasizes (1) getting large Federal grants (eg. $6 million) and (2) emulating homeless housing programs, like the one in Houston, Texas. They focus on designing, building, and developing an all new housing complex for the homeless.

 

Some Pros:

 

  1. All new structure(s).
  2. 100 percent code compliant facility.
  3. Property custom designed and retrofitted for a set purpose, and specific type of occupants.

 

Some Cons:

 

  1. Higher costs and overhead.
  2. Management intensive, and top heavy.
  3. Heavily dependent on government, public, corporate, and political backing.
  4. Operations and administration wrapped in red tape and beauracracy.
  5. Takes 1-to-2 years, or longer, to get from conception to “Open for Occupancy” stage.
  6. Location un-centralized.

 

ANOTHER SOLUTION:

 

More communities around the U. S. are getting very practical and quick responding in their approach.

 

Focus emphasizes: Converting existing multi-family, unit housing into code certified transitional homes for the homeless.

 

 

Some Pros:

 

  1. Property is located within established community.
  2. Public transportation is accessible.
  3. Housing sets within proximity of jobs – eg. entry-level, renewal, lower-skilled jobs.
  4. Structures are solid and adaptable to comply with local codes, state regulations, etc.
  5. Property is paid for. (Caution: See “Cons: 2” below.)
  6. Facility is part of the neighborhood.
  7. Facility can get up and running much faster.
  8. Administration, management, and operations are more grassroots and mission oriented.

 

Some Cons:

 

  1. Structure may need major repairs and upgrading to comply with local codes, and state and federal regulations.
  2. Property and/or business may have liens and old bills attached to it.
  3. If located in a run-down neighborhood, serious problems may be embedded – eg. drug trafficking, vandalism, numerous abandoned properties.
  4. Maintaining safe property environment may be difficult, dangerous and costly.

 

 

Both housing solutions named here are viable. Deciding which direction to take depends on many factors. Many more than I can name. Many beyond my background and capabilities as a painter and decorator.

 

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“Help starts with a home.”   RDH     

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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