Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

Archive for December, 2015

Hotel Painting with Bob: 2016 and Beyond

Out with the old,  and in with the new!

 

Welcome, everyone, to a new year of painting projects.
 

 

YEAR 2016 can be viewed in all sorts of new and fascinating ways.

 

If you haven’t done so in the past, let your creativity flow. Generate new ideas for decorating your living spaces and your businesses.

 

WHY? And, is it within our budget?

 

You can “THINK BIG,” yet start small, if you wish. Or, you can treat it – any new or upgrading project – as an investment for the future.

 

Painting and decorating has been around for a long time. Even the Egyptians adorned their buildings with vivid colors and figurative designs. They expressed themselves to demonstrate the value they placed on their way of life.

 

You, too, can “express the best” that your hotel or resort stands for! 

 

Repaint the walls of your lobby, public restrooms, guest rooms/suites or villas, etc. in colors which express your hotel or resort’s inner spirit – and attitude toward life. And, your guests!

 

Refinish pieces of furniture to renew their value. To give them a big lift!

 

Texture and/or Faux Finish a ceiling to create depth and variety in the surface appeal.

 

Spray finish exterior furniture to create a fresh, inviting, and durable look. You can even apply a decorative finish for a traditional or classic appeal.

 

What you can keep in mind is this:

 

Whatever “environment” you are thinking about painting or refinishing, let your creativity be your guide. Just go for it!

 

Don’t hold back.

 

And, if you are in doubt as to the right procedure to follow? Seek a certified, journey-level painter and decorator to help you out. Someone more experienced than you. Someone with a more extensive background in an area that you want to tackle.

 

Or, just go for it! And, paint it for yourself.

 

Either way, the outcome will revive your property. And, rejuvenate you, too.
Let the use of paint, color, and texture inspire you. Excite you. Lift you. Challenge you. Renew you.

 

HAVE A FRUITFUL NEW YEAR, EVERYONE!

 

And, remember:

 

No painting project is too small, if you see it will add joy to the lives of teammates and managers, guests and visitors. No painting project is too small, if you see it will add joy to your life. Both on and off the job!

 

Robert “Bob” Hajtovik

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Thanks for visiting ” Painting with Bob,” a painting blog with spirit.

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

Paintshop: How to Purchase a Spray Finishing System

 

To save time and money, I recommend the use of a spray system. You can purchase or rent the system you need and/or want.

 

To purchase a specific make and model, contact the manufacturer, their nearest distribution center, or a manufacturer’s sales rep. Or, the needed spray system may be available through a certified commercial equipment outlet – in-store, or on-line.

 

To rent the same or equitable system, contact or visit your local equipment rental center. By the way, equipment rental fees depend on frequency of use.

 

Of course, whether you purchase or rent, allow yourself a little time to (1) familiarize yourself with the equipment, and (2) learn the techniques involved in using that spray system.

 

The question: How much time and money do you want to save?

 

With paint spraying equipment, you need to think about a spray pump’s capacity, and the extent of your intended project.

 

EXAMPLES:

 

1.Paint a Door. It may require only a small hand-held airless, or HVLP, spray unit.

 

2.Paint a Ceiling. Use airless system, between ½ and ¾ gpm capacity. Spray tip: .017 -.021.

 

3.Paint Ceiling Deck of Warehouse. Use airless with capacity of 1-2 gpm. Spray tip: .023-.027.

 

4.Paint Metal Partitions. Use 6 cfm compressor and an hvlp, or conventional spray gun.

 

5.Paint Structural Steel. Use 9-15 cfm compressor, and a conventional or airless spray system.

 

6.Apply Stain to Moldings. Use hand-held airless, conventional, or hvlp spray system.

 

The paint spray systems used today are highly diversified. And, they vary greatly in cost. Prices can range anywhere from just under $100.00 to in access of $15,000.00.

 

When it comes to accessories, you may need to purchase an air compressor, air and/ or fluid hoses, paint supply tank, regulators, moisture separators, paint filter screens, siphon cups, etc.

 

When selecting a brand, choose from the following manufacturers:

Spray Pumps – Graco, Spray Tech, Wagner, Titan, and Apollo.

Spray Guns – Binks, Devilbiss, Sharpe, Sata, and Iwata.

NOTE: These manufacturers are recognized for the precision design and configuration, quality, usability, durability, and maintainability of their spray systems. Also, their product warranties, return and replacement policies, AND level of long-term customer service.

 

TIP: It is important to choose a system which will enable you to prime, paint, and finish a variety of projects – with various types of materials. That way you assure yourself of a good investment.

 

MINI-GLOSSARY

 

Gpm – Gallon per minute.

Cfm – Cubic feet per minute.

Hvlp – High volume low pressure.

0.013- 0.031 millimeter – Airless spray tip orifice sizes.

Orifice – (Small) opening.

 

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The quality of a spray paint or finish job depends as much on the person

pushing and releasing that lever, as on the spray system being used.

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Thanks, Graco group. And thanks, everyone, for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Project Management: Equipment Rental versus Ownership

 

You don’t have the equipment needed to do the job? About anything you need can be found at a local equipment rental place.

 

Commercial/industrial rental centers provide a reliable resource for completing your project work. On time, to spec., within budget. And, at first-rate quality. Whether you need a paint spray pump and hoses, compressor, or pressure washer. Even equipment like extension ladders, scaffolding and hydraulics.

Charge: Typically a fee for hourly, half day or 24 hour use. Just make sure you bring it back as you found it – and on time.

Maintenance: All maintenance is taken care of by them.

 

When you opt for purchasing, you take on more responsibility and long-term costs. The biggest difference is that the equipment you purchased will be available for use any time you want. The maintenance is up to you. And the choice of whether or not to purchase insurance rests with you, too.

 

A List of Pros and Cons

 
1. When renting there is no guarantee on the level of performance of the equipment. You could be renting a piece of equipment which really needs to be overhauled.

 

2. As the first owner-operator a new spray pump can have an unquestionable maintenance record.

 

3. As a renter, you are obligated to return the equipment in the same condition as you rented it. If not, you will have to pay for damages.

 

4. By owning a piece of equipment, you have the best guarantee that the equipment will be available when needed. Examples:  Spray pump, pressure washer, extension ladder, scaffolding.

 

5. Theft of rental or owned equipment can be an asset or a loss, depending on whether or not you have insured the equipment.

 

6. Owning equipment may require that you have a supply of repair parts, in case something breaks, wears out or gets damaged – outside of the warranty.

 

7. Also, you, or someone you enlist (pay), must be able to actually do the repair, replacement, and maintenance work on the equipment.

 

A few things to consider when looking for equipment

 

1. If you are thinking of purchasing, can you afford the expenditure, when weighed against your gross sales, overhead expenses and needed/desired profit?

 

2. Or is renting less of a strain on your monthly expenses?

 

3. Is the purchase warranted? Do, or will you, have the volume of work to get a return on your investment? Can you afford the maintenance costs? Will you be using the equipment frequently enough?

 

Sometimes it boils down to one thing having nothing to do with the cost. For instance, convenience carries a lot of weight. It focuses on “time-saving.” And, saving time translates into increased profits and operating capital. Who doesn’t want that?

 

If you are set on purchasing, buy the best equipment that you can afford. And, make your selection from one of the top manufacturers.

 

Happy Equipment Hunting!

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Purchase for the long haul. Rent to get the project done on time.

Purchase or rent to get the project done right!

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Happy New Year! And, many thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”
Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved

Painting It: Estimating Paint Quantity and Cost

 

In the process of estimating a project, always include the amount of each paint product you will need to use. That means: Number of pints, quarts, gallons, and five-gallon quantities.

 

When the project is small and requires only one type of material, priced at under ten dollars, there’s rarely a problem. It becomes more complicated when you have an entire house, or a commercial building, to paint.

 

When costs enter the picture, accuracy and precision are the rule of thumb. It is possible to bid a job, receive it and later find that you have underbid the work. Let’s say by twenty gallons, and at a cost of $340.00.

 

There’s no problem if your total estimate is in the thousands. But, if the bid is $700.00, then you have just lost 50% of the gross payment. Add those mistakes add up big time over the course of a year. You will barely realize a profit.

 

A permanent solution so you don’t underbid – unintentionally.

 

1. Estimate (accurately) the total square feet and linear feet of the project.

A. Square feet: Measure length and height of longest and adjacent wall. Multiply.

B. Linear feet: Measure length of longest wall/area. Multiply by number of walls.

 

2. Establish a spreadsheet on the various products by name, and cost per unit.

A. For each product, list the manufacturer’s color name and code number.

B. Specify the manufacturer for each product you intend on using.

 

3. Calculate a base figure for sales tax for all quantity units.

 

4. Establish a spreadsheet detailing specific surface coverage for each material.

 

5. Design a chart comparing surface texture with volume of material used.

 

6. Figure in a transportation charge for pickup and delivery of supplies.

 

General Rules of Thumb – based on quality of product you choose.

 

1. Average gallon of latex paint covers = 400 sq. ft. at cost of $9.00 – $21.00.

2. Average bedroom = 1.5 gallons of paint.

3. Clear coating a wood door = 1 quart of finish at cost of $12.00 – $15.00.

4. Semi-gloss latex for bathroom ceiling = ½ gallon at cost of $6.00 – $9.00.

5. Latex paint for 2500 sq. ft. house = 7 gallons at cost of $120.00 – $160.00.

6. Oil stain 10 Oak doors = 1 gallon at cost of $22.00 – $30.00.

 

Estimating paint product quantity and cost takes time. It deserves your full attention. Even the top estimators –eg. in construction, or engineering/facilities management – know the tradeoffs for doing their job right. Every time.

 

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Estimate each time as though your job depends on your accuracy.

Probably, it does. And, so do the jobs of others!

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Enjoy your New Year. And, thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Remodeling, Retrofitting and Redecorating for an 81-Year Old “Roommate”

 

A literary agent, with whom I’ve become acquainted, lives in a hotel penthouse in Manhattan. She calls it the smartest investment that she’s ever made.

 

The woman protects her investment by self-paying for the remodeling, and the painting and decorating, of the 4,500 square foot property.

 

She keeps a small, by comparison, 2,000 square foot apartment in South Florida. On the top floor of an ocean front hotel. She self-pays for the painting and decorating of that property, too.

 

Both homes are decorated in light-toned natural woods, fibers and colors. And relaxing patterns.

* Woods: Oak, pine, olive ash, and sycamore.

* Fibers: Leather, chenille, chintz, and cords.

* Colors: Ivory, ecru, soft coral, muted lime green, and pale turquoise.

* Patterns: Narrow stripes, one-half to one-inch checks, and small block prints; subdued geometrics, pastel floral garden prints.

 

Both homes are furnished and accessorized with an eclectic collection of pieces from the Midwest. Some have been inherited or “gifted” from relatives. Others have been purchased from small antique and second-hand shops in western Ohio and eastern Indiana.

 

What stands out about the person is what also stands out about her homes. (And her office.) A practical, understated and low-stress approach to business, relationships, and life.

 

In 2015, the 30+ year publishing veteran started to remodel both her New York City and Miami homes. They are being retrofitted to accommodate her new roommate: her 81-year old mother.

 

The younger woman runs three miles every day. The older woman hand-pushes her wheelchair or walker around every foot, every day.

 

In some ways, their lives couldn’t be more different. In most ways, starting now, their schedules couldn’t be more in sync. And, their needs and preferences couldn’t be more unique.

 

The same woods and colors are being used, as before. Some fibers will change.

 

All structural impediments are being removed: steps, stairs, raised/lowered floor areas, landings; protruding walls, sharp corners, barriers, protrusions. Doorways are being widened to at least 42 inches. All doors will open outward, from whichever side a person is approaching. Also, they will open by a touch pad, or remote-controlled beam.

 

What the literary agent calls “ballet bars” – actually padded safety bars – are being installed along every walkway, wall, base cabinetry unit/section, etcetera. Also in every bathtub and shower, the outdoor patio, etc.

 

All plush carpeting has been removed, and will be replaced with tightly-woven commercial grade floor covering. Like you find in fine restaurants, hotels and resorts, hospitals, business complexes.

 

All sinks, cupboards, countertops, appliances, fixtures, commodes, etc. are being lowered or raised to ease their use.

 

All upholstered pieces will be outfitted with washable, rubber-backed, and soft snugly-fitting slipcovers. All window treatments and systems – shades, blinds, curtains, drapes – will be controlled by remote, or by hand. So will all fixtures – eg. lighting, faucets. So will all cabinet, drawer, closet, and appliance doors.

 

The idea is to help make both homes as livable as possible for both “roommates.” To make accommodations for impairments, special needs, and even future limitations natural and easy to use. While making the preferences of each resident an important part of the “blended lifestyle”!

 

As the daughter and homeowner puts it, “I want to provide a very safe and secure home. And a sanctuary for now, and the future. For both of us…”

 

On the day that I stood inside the Florida apartment, rain pelted against the French doors, that led to the extra wide patio. Through the haze, I could see the ocean waves rolling into shore.

 

“It’s all so beautiful,” a soft voice, weakened by age and illness, remarked from beside me. “A very different, but good beautiful from our old home in Ohio.”

 

The lady sat in her wheelchair. A fleece-lined pants and hooded jacket in soft daffodil yellow kept her cozy. She peered through her new pair of binoculars.

 

“What a place! If Daddy (her husband) could see us now!”

 

“Wait till our Florida place is completely remodeled, retrofitted and redecorated, Mom.”

 

What an honor to be a part of such a special project.

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Accommodating for others’ needs and preferences also accommodates for our own.

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Thanks for being a part of the world of “life” and for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Fine Finishing: Custom Walking Sticks

 

My grandfather woodcrafted fine walking sticks after he retired. He cut most from Cherrywood; some from Walnut (Black and European); a few from Ebony; also Brazilian Mahogany, Teak, and Rosewood.

 

Each featured distinctive characteristics:

 

. custom-cut, solid shaft in length and diameter;

. custom-designed, molded and etched brass head, and tip;

. custom-designed, turned and etched brass shaft rings;

. custom-etched owner’s monogram, in brass head.

 

The wood for each piece was hand-selected for its unique and suitable qualities: hardness, color, grain, texture, etc.

 

He ordered the wood for each piece individually, and directly from the mill. Two mills were located in the United States. The others were located in France, Italy, South America, India, and Australia.

 

Upon arrival, Grandfather Boyd cut the wood piece to customer specifications (length and diameter), allowing extra millimeters for working it. Next, the piece was formed. Then shaped and planed, and rounded. It was sanded many times. Each time to flawless smoothness.

 

When the finishing phases were reached, the walking stick was rag-stained twice, and rubbed twice. Grandfather applied many coats of final finish. He allowed as many as 20 days of drying time between each coat. A lacquer finish was the favorite. Known for its distinction and elegance, and its astounding durability.

 

Grandfather advertised his custom walking sticks in only two magazines: The New Yorker and Esquire. For a short period, he advertised also in The New York Times, The Atlantic Monthly, and The Christian Science Monitor.

 

Here’s how the purchasing process worked…

 

A person saw Grandfather’s walking stick ad. He or she phoned him at the listed “812” area code phone number. Grandfather described the walking sticks. He asked a few questions about the person’s background and interests. He asked how and where the walking stick would be used. He asked about the person’s wood preference. He offered an estimate of the handcrafted accessory.

 

Each interested person was sent two distinctive business cards and a matching note card. Both were printed on pale blue linen, and featured an India-ink sketch of a walking stick. Enclosed was a Polaroid photo of a finished walking stick, a simple order form, and the terms of sale.

 

On the order form, the client selected his or her choice of wood. The person provided his or her measurements: overall height, overall weight, whether left-or-right-handed; waist-to-floor height; hands-open palm width; also length from wrist-to-finger tips; etc. The client listed any physical handicaps that he or she might have had – relative to the need for and use of a walking stick.

 

By phone, Grandfather confirmed the client’s wood preference. They agreed upon the finish delivery date. They agreed upon the total cost, including shipping. They agreed upon the actual packaging and shipping preference.

 

Every client left the brass head and tip design to my grandfather. Most also left the stain and finish to my grandfather’s discretion.

 

Between 1972 and 1987, he handcrafted over 70 distinctive walking sticks. Starting in late 1975, he offered clients a beautiful accessory: a custom-made satin-lined, plush velvet carry bag. Also, it featured a custom monogram on the outside, and a distinctive, hand-sewn identity label inside.

 

His clientele were stars of film, television, and the stage; comedians; best-selling authors; artists, musicians, opera stars; entrepreneurs and executives; leaders in medicine, science, government.

 

Grandfather moved to Florida in 1988. He also moved some prized woodworking tools and equipment. Also, his walking stick materials, forms and molds.

 

He planned to handcraft more walking sticks. It didn’t work out. The workshop on his lovely second wife’s lakefront property lacked climate-control. And, it lacked the ample workspace.

 

In August of 2015, a letter addressed to Grandfather Boyd was forwarded to my mother. The writer stated that, in 2014, he had purchased “two exquisite walking sticks.” Still in their monogrammed velvet cases. They’d been sold at an estate auction in Southern California.

 

The writer explained that, inside each case, the original owner had kept one of my grandfather’s blue linen business cards. That’s how the new owner knew the name of the woodcrafter. And, then “Goggled” to reach him.

 

Isn’t ISP and social media wonderful? Almost as grand as Grandfather Boyd’s distinctive walking sticks.

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Have you walked lately in another person’s shoes? How did they fit?

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Thank you, everyone, for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Paint Manufacturer Networking…

 

For over thirty-three years, my father made it a special point to stop by and visit area paint manufacturers’ stores and warehouses. Year-round, the paint shop’s schedule ran bone-tight. And, my father’s schedule allowed little or no time to spare

 

Still, he paid a visit to at least one paint supplier. Every week. He believed in taking a special interest in the persons that operated those stores. The professionals that serviced customers. Like him.

 

He respected them. And, he listened to what they had to say.

 

  1. He picked up special orders, and more products and supplies.
  2. He wanted to ensure that the men had what they needed to do their jobs.
  3. He wanted to ensure that the men could finish current projects as contracted: according to specification, in compliance, and on, or ahead of, schedule.
  4. He helped the on-site and project foremen and crews out.
  5. He requisitioned, purchased, and picked up orders.
  6. He loaded up with valuable stuff, and carried it back to the shop and/or onto our job sites.
  7. Product samples.
  8. Industry news.
  9. Insider notifications about new architectural/construction projects.
  10. Advance announcements of scheduled demonstrations, certification programs, etc.

 

He knew them all. He knew everyone at each store. He knew which company manufactured and sold the better, or best, product for each specific surface, area, and job. Also, the most cost-effective price.

 

He knew who to ask about what. He knew who to trust – who would tell it to him straight. Including both the pros and cons of their own products, materials and supplies.

 

Occasionally, it worked out that I could go along when my father needed to pick up supplies. His main regular stops: MAB, Sherwin-Williams, Glidden, PPG, Benjamin Moore, Duron, Valspar.

 

 

I don’t follow in those footsteps – exactly.

 

I try to stop by a paint store once a month – besides for picking up supplies. My biggest reasons:

 

(1) to visit with the store manager or assistant manager;

(2) to pick a technical consultant’s or manufacturer rep’s brain;

(3) to run into other area painters and decorators; and,

(4) to check on what’s new, changed, discontinued, etc.

 

I’m not as skilled, as my father, at paint store “stop-offs.” I’m not as tuned-in as he was. My stops at local paint manufacturer stores are briefer, and less often. They are more like: “Run in, say ‘Hi,’ visit for five minutes, get what I need, load it onto my truck, leave the experts to their work, and drive away.”

 

Back in August, I was drafting a blog about a special ceiling paint project done over two years ago. Last month, on the same 91-degree afternoon, I stopped at three manufacturer stores, Michael’s Crafts, and  Home Depot to re-check my facts for the products and materials that I’d used on that project.

 

It was good to see that, at the paint manufacturer stores and at Home Depot, painters’ and painting contractors’ trucks filled the parking lots. And painters in their “whites” were shopping inside.

 

At Sherwin-Williams, I re-checked color chip numbers and names for primers and paints.

 

At Gliddens, I watched the live demonstration of a newer commercial clear coat that floats glossy smooth onto any interior surface.

 

At Porter Paints/PPG, the manager rummaged in an old cabinet, and found a color, or “paint chip,” book from 2013.

 

At Michael’s, an artist paint product expert showed me a few application advantages of Liquitex, when painting special-effects “virtual” walls in children’s bedrooms or play areas. Exciting!

 

At Home Depot, the coating specialist got me a sample of Behr’s acrylic resin coating for residential driveways. And, I helped a lady customer understand how to get a visually accurate idea how her selected grey blue paint color would look in her bedroom.

 

The thing is…

 

In 2015, painters’ visits to the actual paint stores are an anomaly. Any supply or sample can be ordered on-line, and delivered to the door. Product information, composition, colors and finishes, pricing, availability, shipping terms, etc. can be researched on manufacturer, distributor and industry websites.

 

Paint stores e-mail their news, announcements, notices, and invitations.

 

You can say “Hello,” “live chat,” and “keep in touch” with paint store managers and reps by Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, etc.  You can group-meet by Skypp.

 

What painter and decorator needs to stop by the actual store, like my father and his fellow crafts persons did?

 

Well… ME!   Perhaps you, too.

 

Stop by a paint manufacturer’s local store. Say “hello.” Get acquainted. Check out their product sales. Pick their brains. Tap into their networks. Stay connected. They are product and procedure experts. And, they are still great GO-TO guys.

 

Amazing product possibilities can surface for your next surface-finishing project at a paint store or paint shoppe.

 

Hot Summer Tip: Too hot and humid to put in those long hours painting outdoors? Knock off a little early. And, stop by a paint store you haven’t visited for too long. (A carry-in snack for everyone there might be a nice touch.)

 

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Discovery is a fun part of the work day. A time to get out your goals, and travel forward.

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Thanks to everyone that visits, follows, comments, and critiques “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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