Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

Mark, a hotel painter, told me about a recent “guest” experience. “I’ve gotten over the guest’s verbal outburst. Not the general manager’s verbal attack. He blamed me, again. After I’d followed his orders.”

 

“I waited till 11 am to paint the concrete walkway outside of a row of guest rooms. The paint takes a half hour to dry, in most cases. At 11:15, a guest came back earlier than expected, and couldn’t get in his room. He had a fit.”

 

“This sort of thing happens regularly,” explained the painter. “My supervisor or G.M. tells me to do something one way. I follow instructions. One of them – usually the G. M. – comes back later, and calls me out. Or tells me to do it differently. Often the way that I proposed in the beginning. Bob, I know what I’m doing.”

 

Mark had been the hotel’s lead painter for over nine years. He’d been a journey-level painter over seventeen years. For six of them, he’d run projects for a commercial contractor. And trained people.

 

“It’s the trickle down effect,” he said. “I recognize that.”

 

Mark explained that he didn’t mind taking his share of the blame. “I don’t even mind taking all of the blame occasionally. Especially, when it takes a bit of the heat off my boss. The chief engineer. He’s one hard worker….But these frequent attacks…”

 

I tried to reassure him. “It happens to everyone at some time. Wherever they work. Like you said, ‘Its the trickle down effect.’” But I added, “And, that’s okay, Mark. As long as the trickles are landing on other team members, too.”

 

How would you handle a situation like this?

 

What would you say to your G.M., or facility’s operations manager? To your supervisor?

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Great leaders have an uncanny knack of knowing what you’re good at, and what you’re not. 

…Paraphrased quote by Philip Gulley.

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Daily thanks to you, for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik.

All rights reserved.

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