Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

At a seminary reunion, some of my grandfather’s old classmates asked how he managed to have such a successful church, financially.

 

“I stay out of their business,” he told me he answered, “and mind my own.”

 

The same goes for a painter. Whether on the staff, with a contractor’s crew, or a temporary worker.

 

Stay out of what does not directly concern, or relate, to you and your work there. Mind your own business. Let other people do their jobs. And you do yours.

 

Simple enough, right?

 

A FEW MIND-YOUR-OWN-BUSINESS SCENARIOS

 

1. Your hotel is managed and operated by an outside company.

There should be no need for you to communicate directly with them, unless an authorized company official initiates that. Then, watch what you say. Also, promptly tell your supervisor about the communication: who initiated it; who said what, when, where, etc.

TIP: If you do need to connect with them, first follow the chain of command on your end. Example: supervisor, manager, administrator.

 

2. You run into a big problem on a commercial project, applying wall vinyl selected by the customer.

Do not contact the customer yourself. Unless it is part of your job to deal directly with them.

TIP: Call your job foreman, or company boss.

 

3.  Staff members in another department are having problems handling assigned tasks, that you can help make easier and safer for them.

It is not your call!

TIP: Offer no advice nor help on your own. First get written authorization from your supervisor/ director and the supervisor/director of that other department.

 

4.  You have a serious teammate or fellow staff member situation.

Do not run to Human Resources! Not to one person there.

TIP: First, keep it in the department. Privately mention the matter to your supervisor, in a “What can I do?” or “How do you advise I proceed?” frame.

TIP: Refrain from criticizing, running down, or tearing/apart your coworker. Let your boss check into the problem.

 

5. A client’s top official or manager repeatedly interferes with your ability to complete project.

Please, do not communicate directly with any client’s official.

TIP: Promptly alert your company’s superintendent, senior officer or owner. Let it up to him or her to handle it.
6. Another trade craftsperson, working on the same large project, keeps damaging the surface areas you’ve already finish coated.

Do not say one word to that craftsperson’s boss – foreman, superintendent, company owner.

TIP 1: If you’re the lead painter or foreman, try taking the craftsperson aside, and politely asking him or her to please be more careful.

TIP 2: If you’re a crew painter, hint how those mishaps might affect everyone’s paychecks, and the final sign off by the client or customer.

TIP 3: Promptly, notify your superintendent, or employer. Report the problem. Stick to the facts.

TIP 4: If you’re a temporary, report the matter to your assigned contact with your temporary staffing company.

 

It can be tempting to step forward, and try to handle a problem or situation, that is not within your authority.

 

Bottom line: Keep it straight with yourself who is responsible for what, and who, ultimately, is in charge. And do not let anyone else – even a boss – put you in that position. It could raise serious liability problems and legal questions.

 

*************************************************************************************

One key to troubleshooting on the job or project is keeping out of other people’s business.

*************************************************************************************

Many thanks, mentors, for mentoring me well!  Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: