Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

Archive for May, 2016

Painter’s World: Memory in the Workplace and Workspace

No one remembers everything. Only occasionally, do we remember all that we set out to do.

 

The brain is an information highway, full of stop signs and high speed passing lanes.

 

At leisure: The brain is under minimal stress.

 

At work: The brain is subjected to and bombarded with multiple assignments and procedures, throughout the day. And, each tests the brain’s capacity to remember.

 

Relying on your memory to help you complete tasks at work is selective at best. Say that you have determined the steps in doing something. When the time comes, you may be able to remember only certain things – and will forget other things.

 

TIPS FOR PRESERVING AND MAXIMIZING YOUR MEMORY AT WORK

 

1. Create mental cues.

TIP: Use key imagery hints related to what you want to remember.

TIP: Form associations. Eg. To file a report, set a time and place.

 

2. Make it noteworthy.

TIP: Write yourself a note to remind yourself. And, keep it very handy!

 

3. Involve others.

TIP: Several persons remembering the same thing is insurance that the information or task will not be forgotten. Note: This is team playing, first class!

 

4. At work station.

TIP: Create duty/memory board. If it’s critical, write in big letters. And, vary your colors.

 

5. Messaging.

TIP: Place notes at strategic spots where you will see them. More is better.

 

6. Prioritize.

Example: When your day begins, write a brief description of your duties, in order of importance or scheduling priority.

TIP: The most essential items always go at the top of the list.

 

7. Minimize.

Example: Distractions can undo your working and short-term memories.

Your thoughts become fragmented, and you are less likely to finish what you start. You are much less likely to do it well.

TIP: When at work, FOCUS.

 

 

When trying to remember? Keep your mental list short, and your notebook list detailed.

 

Hope your painting world is working for you! Thank you, everyone, for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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Painting for Fun: Curbside Recycling Contest

An Indiana town ran a curbside recycling contest. The block of residents that did the best job at recycling the most discard items during the one month period would win a month’s free garbage service. That’s every household on the winning block.

 

An 81-year old grandmother got the idea. Her visiting teenage granddaughter found a wicker nightstand and the curb, and redecorated it in the grandparents’ garage.

 

How many other useable things were being thrown out, both of them wondered? So, that Sunday afternoon, the teen drove Grandma around town. And, they took a look at all of the stuff that people were putting to the curb, for garbage pickup the next day.

 

Grandma’s idea related more to the adage, “One man’s junk is another man’s treasure,” than sharply reducing the town’s volume of garbage.

 

Some interesting things happened during the run of the contest.

 

1.  The curbs were free of discarded furniture, lamps, rugs, housewares, hardware, small appliances, clothes, books, and toys. So the weekly garbage pick ups were much lighter.

2. Paint and construction supply sales shot up.

3. Hardware sales skyrocketed.

4. Local sores couldn’t keep work and utility gloves in stock.

5. The two grocery stores sold a record quantity of gallons of water, boxes of snack bars, fresh fruit, packaged veggie trays, trail mixes, etc.6.

6. Both restaurants experienced a sharp increase in carry-out orders, and a sharp decrease in eat-in customers.

7. Sunday attendance at all five churches increased, while participation in evening and weekend activities dropped.

8. At the only service-convenience store, all sales increased – including gas.

9. And, every handyman, carpenter, plumber, and painter in town was bombarded with “how-to” questions.

 

Our cousin’s Easter 2016 e-letter reprinted the news story about the contest in their town. Also featured were “block” photos of some of the recycled discards.

 

Easter night, my cousin’s son called with a “painter’s” question:

“How do you refinish guestroom furniture? I picked up two complete sets by our hotel’s dumpster…”

 

“First thing? Thoroughly vacuum out your garage floor.”

 

I knew that he’d be fine with that. It had been his sister that had swept out their Grandma’s garage, to recycle that wicker nightstand.

 

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Painters recycle surfaces every day. Repairing, prepping and refinishing. Renewing their use.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Coating Tips for Warranty-Covered Surfaces and Products

I was tempted. A friend wanted me to “change the surface color” of one section of exterior siding bordering a new wood deck and spa.  No thanks! The siding was under a 15-year warranty.

 

Another friend wanted me to paint over the clear glass on each of his security system units.I thought about, even experimented by, custom mixing, then painting on a similar piece of glass.

Final advice: I wouldn’t advise it. The security system and units were under warranty.

 

Cardinal rule: Never paint the surface of any pre-finished product under warranty.

Examples: Exterior siding, security lighting systems, woods, metals, certain roofing, appliances.

 

 

  1. Always apply coatings or finishes according to manufacturer’s recommendations.

 

  1. Always provide the proper surface preparation.

 

  1. Do not apply a finish on an unstable surface. Examples: Hot, cold, too rough.

 

  1. Do not apply finishes over incompatible coatings. Result: Early paint failures.

 

  1. Make sure the primer and finish combinations are compatible.

 

  1. Do not use paint to alter a product, which at some time you may need or want to return.

 

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Coating warranty-covered surfaces and products calls for special vigilance, and a keen eye.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Secondary Factors to Setting Up a Spray Booth

The following factors are essential to produce high quality spray paint jobs. Ones that are not too different from the jobs done in a professional setting.

 

1. Air Dryer System. Consider moisture the enemy. An air dryer greatly reduces the chances of water getting on your work. The dry air produced aids in atomizing the paint supply.

 

2. Oil and Water Filtration. Specialized filters remove oil and water droplets and vapor. If you choose to ignore these factors, be prepared for the results. A ruined paint job for one.

 

3. Particulate Absorption Pads and/or an Air Circulation System. In this set-up, the paint booth is designed with a positive flow air evacuation system. Its “vacuum” removes dust particles, lint and other particulates from the air. Note: It is the most costly and most effective system available in association with using a electrostatic spray system.

 

4. Direct Lighting Source. The idea is to eliminate all shadows cast on the object that you are painting. Overhead and horizontal lighting needs must be met to have an equally lighted space. A few tips:

 

TIP: Wide field halogen lights do well at a distance.

TIP: Assembling one or more fluorescent light support racks on wheels is your best bet.

TIP: Remember: The more angles there are in/with the objects you are painting, the more light you need focused in each and every direction.

 

When building a spray booth, it is important to know the volume of work you intend to use it for. Invest in a spray booth in proportion to use, proper sizes, budget, and profit margin. Also, the availability of a skilled “spray system” painter and finisher.

 

If it’s for a one-time use, use a temporary spray booth system, or set-up. You do not want your spray booth to cost more than the profit you figure that you will make by using it.

 

More important: You do not want your spray booth to cost more than the profit you need to make from completing the job right.

 

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A suitable spray booth on the job can ensure the success and profitability of the job.

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Thanks, everyone, for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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