Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

Archive for June, 2016

TALKING WITH THE BOSS

Even the most capable and likeable staff painter may freeze up when needing to talk with the boss. The urge is to put it off till later.

 

That’s fine in some cases. You might find a good solution on your own. The problem might resolve itself, or run its course. Or, its importance may actually drop a few notches. Compared to bigger or newer stuff.

 

Putting off a  talk with your boss can cause or trigger bigger  problems. And, cost more money to resolve.

 

So, if the problem is only getting bigger, and won’t go away? Ask ahead, “When you can spare ten, I’d appreciate your input on something.”

 

TWELVE TIPS:

  1. Do it face-to-face.
    Exception: The issue can’t wait. And, your boss is accessible today only by mobile, e-mail or facebook.
  2. Jot down the issue or problem, and two closely related facts. Have it ready  to “prod you on,” and keep on center/on point.
  3. Briefly explain the issue, what’s happening, and what you’ve done so far to try to take care of it.

4. Tell you boss, “I’m open for any solutions you might have.”

5. Ask how he wants you to do each solution that he suggests. His and your methods may differ, just enough to cause failure.

6. Stop. Ask your boss to clarify his viewpoint. And you explain yours. Share your feelings on both sides.

7. Work together to figure out a way to manage the problem.

8. Be sure that you understand where your boss is coming from. Ask him how he drew that conclusion.

9. Keep on the issue/problem at hand. Keep to that 10 minutes. Do not go off the track. And, do not side-pedal. Avoid other people’s views. They’re not there!

10. You may need to change your thinking to change your feelings. Take another look at the problem, and your efforts.

11. Seriously consider your boss’s viewpoint. Clear  up your assumptions about your boss’s intentions or motives.

12. Consider how much you may contribute to the problem/issue – and to the problem-solving effort.

 

In hotel/facility painting, the relationship between the painter and his boss is closely linked. They must work as part of a team to keep their department running smoothly – and their property meeting the expectations of a LOT of different people and factions.

 

In commercial and industrial painting, it’s common for problems to surface. Even with products that you’ve been using very successfully for over ten years.

 

Manufacturer’s reps and product analysts are familiar figures on site. Their prompt testing of applications could make the difference between completing a project to specification, and to passing all final inspections. The only way the customer/client pays. And, the individual painter gets his money, too.

 

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Break the ice. Offer your boss a chance to “take ten.” Together.

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

 

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Painters at Work: In Hours, Days, Weeks, Months, Year

How much time do you spend using specific skills and abilities?

A group of 150 painters completed a detailed questionnaire to determine how painters work in the 21st century. It was part of a research project.

 
Section I: Computation of amount of time that we actually work.  

Example:

1. Day-to-week: 8 hours/day x 5 days = 40 hours/1 week

2. Weeks-to-month: 40 hours/1 week x 4 weeks = 160 hours/1 month

3. Months-to-year: 160 hours/1 month x 11 months = 1760 hours/11 months

4. ADD: 40 hours x 2 weeks = 80 hours/ ½ month

5. Approximate Total Hours = 1840 hours/ 11 ½ months (excludes 80 hrs./vacation time).

 

Section II: Computation of how we spend our time, based on following information:

 

1. Paint skills and abilities used alone;

2. Paint skills and abilities in combination/simultaneously;

3. Paint movements and positions used alone;

4. Paint movements and positions used in combination/simultaneously;

5. Paint tools and equipment used alone;

6. Paint tools and equipment used in combination/simultaneously.

 

COMPUTATIONS FOR TEN OF THE QUESTIONS.

 

Note: All painters checked the box beside:  “My figures/estimates are on the low side.”

 

1. How many hours do you hold a paint brush?

A. 6 hrs./day x 5 days = 30 hrs./1 week

B. 30 hrs/1 wk. x 4 wks. = 120 hrs./1 month

C. 120 hrs/1 mo. x 11 mos. = 1320 hrs./11 months

D. ADD: 30 hrs x 2 wks. = 60 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 1380 hrs./11 ½ months

 

2. How many hours do you use a spray gun?

A. 6.5 hrs./day x 5 days = 32.5 hrs./1 week

B. 32.5 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 130 hrs./1 month

C. 130 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 1430 hrs./11 months

D. ADD: 32.5 hrs./1 wk. x 2 wks. = 65 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 1495 hrs./11 ½ months

 

3. How many hours do you stand?

A. 7 hrs./day x 5 days = 35 hrs./1 week

B. 35 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 140 hrs./1 month

C. 140 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 1540 hrs./11 months

D. ADD: 35 hrs. x 2 wks. = 70 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 1610 hrs./11 ½ months.

 

4. How many hours do you carry?

A. 3 hrs./day x 5 days = 15 hrs./1 week

B. 15 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 60 hrs./1 month

C. 60 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 660 hrs./11 months

D. Add: 15 hrs. x 2 wks. = 30 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 690 hrs./ 11 ½ months

 

5. How many hours do you lift?*

A. 3 hrs./day x 5 days = 15 hrs./1 week

B. 15 hrs. wk. x 4 wks. = 60 hrs./1 month

C. 60 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 660 hrs./11 months

D. Add: 15 hrs. x 2 wks. = 30 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 690 hrs./ 11 ½ months

* Does not show the number of times painter lifts/carries combination of cans, buckets, tools, etc.

 

6. How many hours do you walk and/or step?

A. 5 hrs./day x 5 days = 25 hrs./1 week

B. 25 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 100 hrs./1 month

C. 100 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 1100 hrs./11 months

D. ADD: 25 hrs. x 2 wks. = 50 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 1150 hrs./ 11 ½ months

 

7. How many hours do you climb?

A. 5 hrs./day x 5 days = 25 hrs./1 week

B. 25 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 100 hrs./1 month

C. 100 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 1100 hrs./11 months

D. ADD: 25 hrs. x 2 wks. = 50 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 1150 hrs./ 11 ½ months

 

8. How many hours do you bend, kneel and/or crouch?

A. 3 hrs./day x 5 days = 15 hrs./1 week

B. 15 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 60 hrs./1 month

C. 60 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 660 hrs./ 11 months

D. ADD: 15 hrs. x 2 wks. = 30 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 690 hrs./ 11 ½ months

 

9. How much weight do you lift?  * Does not include weight of container

A. Paint (gal) = 122 fl. ounces/7.6 lbs.

B. Paint (qt.) =   31 fl. ounces/1.94 lbs.

C. Paint (5 gal) = 620 fl. ounces/38/.7 lbs.

D. Ladder (6 ft./wood) =

E. Ladder (6 ft./alum.) =

F. Ladder (12 ft. extension/alum) =

G. Tool kit = 15 lbs.
* Does not show number of times painter is lifting/carrying combination of product cans, tools, and equipment at same time.

Examples:

A. 2 gal paint = 15.2 lbs.

B. 1 gal paint (7.6 lbs.) + 1 ladder/6 ft. aluminum (23.8 lbs.) = 31.4 lbs.

C. 1-5 gal. paint (38.8 lbs.) + 1 ladder 12-ft aluminum (69 lbs.) = 107.8 lbs.

D. 1-5 gal. paint (38.8 lbs.) + 1 spray gun + system (23.5 lbs.) = 63.9 lbs.

E. 1-gal paint (7.6 lbs.) + 1 tool (15 lbs.) = 21.6 lbs.

 

10. How many hours do you match paint colors to painted surfaces?

A. 0.5 hrs./day x 5 days = 2.5 hrs./1 week

B. 2.5 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 10 hrs./1 month

C. 10 hrs./1 mo. x 11 months = 110 hrs./ 11 months

D. ADD: 2.5 hrs./1 wk. x 2 wks. = 5 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 115 hrs./11 ½ months

 

Section II included the following questions that required painters to calculate their time:

 

11. How many hours do you prepare surfaces? Ex: A. Filling/caulking, B. Sanding, C. Patching, D. Priming

12. How many hours do you spend cleaning preparation and painting tools?

13. How many hours do you repair painting tools and equipment?

14. How many hours do you use a computer?

15. How many hours do you use a mobile communication device?

16. How many hours do you use a calculator, or other computation device/software program? 

 

Section III required the painters to identify the skills/abilities and tasks they used simultaneously. Example: Painting – use brush – carry, then stand on ladder – carry 1 gallon of paint.

 

Then, painters needed to compute how much time they performed/used/did each part within that combination.

 

How will this data be used? Why is it important? Here’s a capsule view:

 

1. Federal and state agencies can determine how actual job descriptions for specific occupations have changed.

2. Wage/pay scale experts can identify changes in calculating actual task-to-time rates.

3. Educational, vocational and technical program developers determine real-world/real-time curricular needs of current and future workers.

4. Recruitment and employment specialists identify how to market and fill positions, based on a three-to-five year worker retention scale.

5. Industry manufacturers of products, materials, supplies, tools, equipment, etc. can better identify the needs of the specific types persons that will be using their products.

6. Health industry providers determine newer problem areas in symptomology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis; also project industry needs in patient care.

 

This particular research  project is still being conducted. Is it the type of project in which the average painter should participate? ABSOLUTELY!

 

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Build up your own profession, craft or trade – especially for the next generation!

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Decorative Painting A-La-Theme

Mary Engelbreit Desk, Chair and Lamp Mary Engelbreit Dry Sink

 

 

 

A fun thing can be when the client is your own sister.

 

A challenging thing can be when the theme that she wants is Mary Engelbreit, named after the artist. (See below: “About graphic artist Mary Engelbreit.)

Each painting, greeting card,  book cover, collectible is a story-telling and message-sending masterpiece.

 

Each scene depicting the “events, ideas and values of family, friends and the artist.” Each graphic design capturing life in vivid color, “close-up” detail, and emotional honesty.

 

How do you re-create or capture a Mary Engelbreit-inspired design, or theme?

 

How do you plan, lay out, grid, and sketch in the actual design? On whatever piece the client – your sister – has selected, provided, requested, or dreamed about?

 

Pieces: Furniture, artist canvas, picture frame, mirror frame, cabinetry, lamp, wall, floor, or door.

Surfaces: Wood, fabric, metal, ceramic, glass, china, laminate, plastic, drywall, or cork.

 

Yes, sisters are fun to have! Their dreams can be fun to help bring to life. Their client needs can be fun, and challenging, to fulfill. Their request for a theme can be fun to capture, or recreate.

 

Their choice of a surface can be fun to finish, too.

 

Their specifications with all of those colors?  Well, that can all be fun, too.  Just make sure that your paintshop is equipped with the following:

  1. a supply of good-quality (eg. Liquitex) acrylic base paints – especially primary colors, white and black, also Gesso medium;
  2. a variety of precision brushes and tools – all in excellent condition;
  3. at least 2 dozen small, clean and empty containers – with screw lids;
  4. a sizeable, open and non-traffic work space;
  5. superb full-lighting;
  6. time for unbelievable detail work – at all phases/steps;
  7. excellent ventilation and air flow, and;
  8. a painter that can precisely mix and match any paint color, has a very steady hand, and excels at recreating repetitive patterns that meet the “up close” rule.

 

Did I mention a brother willing to take on a decorative project – for free?
Oh-oh! Sis just found the empty Oreo cookie package in her kitchen garbage.

 

Mary Engelbreit Themed Scenic

About graphic artist Mary Engelbreit: Established in 1986, the Mary Engelbriet Studios (MES) have grown to an international creator and licensor of nearly 6,500 products. Among the most popular: greeting cards, children’s books, gift books, fabric, ceramic figurines, home/interior design books, calendars, T-shirts, mugs. Her new Paperworks line of products – blank cards, boxed cards, coloring books, etc. – are all made in the U.S.A.

 

All represent her signature M.E. artwork. She starts with pen and ink drawings. She follows that with colored markers, then uses colored pencils to shade and highlight; also to preserve the markers.

 

Her renowned malapropism greeting card plays off the saying, “Life is just a bowl of cherries.” The card shows a girl looking at a chair piled high with bowls and has the legend, “Life is just a chair of bowlies.”

 

A native of St. Louis, Missouri, Engelbreit and her husband, Paul, still live and work there.

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Kudos to all siblings, especially the helpful and dream-delivering kind.

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Many thanks, D., for being my sib. And thanks, all, for visiting “Painting with Bob.”
Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

 

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