Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

Decorative finishing can cover a lot of flaws in a substrate. Or an entire area, for that matter.

 

It is an ideal solution for improving or enhancing the aesthetic appearance of a wall, furniture piece, fixture, etc.

 

. You can get very creative in the choice of color(s), patterns, and finishes.

. You can produce amazing results within a limited time to do it – and a limited budget.

. You can use up extra paint in the paintshop, that otherwise might go unused – and go bad.

. You can add a new look, theme and spirit to the total atmosphere.

. You can even increase the value of the property.

 

I rely on decorative finishing – especially faux – to add new life to walls, trim and baseboard, window frames, built-ins, cabinetry fronts (eg. wood), and even floors and doors. It works wonders on furniture, fixtures, mirror and picture frames, decorative accessories, even faded and scratched appliance shells.

 

I’ve seen a faux finished piece or area give residents in assisted living facilities or nursing homes a tremendous lift in mood and attitude, new energy, and new interest in life. I’ve been amazed at how it can renew a sense of hope and motivation in high school students at a low-rated, run down school. I’ve watched as young, mentally challenged children in a hospital smiled and cheered when led into a colorfully accented, faux finished playroom.

 

The possibilities are practically endless. Limited only by you and your readiness to experiment, to create, to invent.

 

 

12 Tips for Creating Decorative Finishes that Float Flaws Out of Sight.

 

  1. Select a faux design or technique that will add to, not detract from, the overall design and purpose of the room, piece, etc.
  2. Uncertain what will look great, versus a visual mistake? Take a little time; and apply each finish you’re considering onto separate sample boards.
  3. Choose an easy design/technique and one color hue when you want or need fast results. Examples: colorwashing, sponging, spattering.
  4. Is your budget real tight? Choose the paint color of a product already in the paintshop.
  5. Choose a paint color that you have when both the base coat and faux glaze must closely blend with the established color scheme of the property, office, home, etc.
  6. Choose a glaze two or more hues brighter when you want to achieve a sharper contrast effect.
  7. Don’t be afraid to mix two or three faux techniques together on the same surface, or even on different parts of, say, a furniture piece. Example: Combing on table legs and feet, sponging on side panels, ragging on top.
  8. For ultimate fun, apply the same technique/design to different parts of a wall, using different colors of glaze over the same base coat color. Example: Red, rust, copper.
  9. Is the table top bruised but the rest of wood piece is okay? Choose base coat in same or darker tone of current wood finish. Then, apply glaze in dark color, that’s close to base color. Or, apply a subtle color that contrasts with the base coat.
  10. Is the front of lobby’s wood counter heavily nicked, scratched, gouged, and even cracked? Apply base coat that’s darker than the wood finish on entire unit. Then apply two colors of glazing using wood grain finish.
  11. Is the top of the general manager’s or president’s large walnut desk have ink and water stains, also burn marks? Apply black base coat. Then apply dark green, royal blue or wine glaze using marbleizing technique.
  12. When the paint amount available is limited, use dry brushing to create a textured effect.
  13. When the area is smaller, use dragging technique to create clean, striped effect.

 

 

You get the idea. There are few substrate and surface flaws that cannot be camouflaged with one or more faux finishes.

 

There are faux finish techniques available to treat nearly every surface appearance problem of a substrate.

 

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Take the time to learn, to try, and to use faux finishes to cover flaws

of otherwise great surfaces, areas, and pieces.

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Thanks, everyone, for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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