Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

Paintshop: Productivity

Some days are more productive than others. Some are much more productive.

 

  1. The weather cooperates.
  2. Everything seems to click into place at the right time.
  3. Everyone and everything stays out of your way.
  4. Your boss or supervisor leaves you alone and does not sidetrack you.
  5. Management occupies themselves with their own problems.
  6. Teammates handle their tasks and work orders on their own.
  7. Guests stay out of your way, or complain about other things.
  8. Everything runs smoothly, and you have what you need to do the job.

 

 

At the hotel, the chief engineer periodically came along and told me to slow down.

 

“You’re working too hard…doing too much.”

 

Several times he asked, “What drives you, Bob? I’ve never seen anyone get so much done. Every day.”

 

“It’s in the genes,” I told him once. “You, too. You work like a dog.”

 

But that’s who I was: a high producer. Even on very detailed projects. With me at least, it was an attribute and skill that was very genetic, on both sides of my family.

 

We all loved what we did. Whatever the task, job or project might have been. Simple or complicated, it didn’t seem to matter. We simply enjoyed doing whatever we needed to do. And, we rarely looked at it as too much to ask, or as boring.

 

10 Tips for Tapping Your Productivity Powers

 

1.Keep everything in your carryall that you’ll need to handle basic tasks and work orders.

Example: 2-inch paint brush, 1 sheet No. #300 grit sandpaper, 1 sheet #1000 grit sandpaper, scraper or 10-in-1 tool, lightweight hammer, standard and Phillip’s screwdrivers, gloves, eye goggles, rag, 1-liter cool water.

 

2. Organize the paintshop so that you can find things quickly, and move them easily.

 

3. Set up your golf cart so that you can carry whatever basic supplies you need for the entire day. Note: This will require the creative use of space, plus 2-3 small storage containers.

 

4. Keep your basic inventory ready to go. Promptly requisition and check on materials and supplies before they run out.

 

5. Maintain and post a weekly calendar where everyone in engineering can refer to it.

 

6. Let your engineer know in advance about any job/project problems that you foresee.

 

7. In advance, ask for help from your engineer and/or teammates to handle work orders or projects that require more manpower than you have on your own.

 

8. Finish what you start in as timely manner as possible.

 

9. Always have several, different-sized and types of projects going. This enables you to use shorter spans of time wisely and creatively.

 

10. Give yourself regular breaks every day. Especially when you’re working on a tough work order or project, working outdoors in the heat and humidity, or working with products/materials that require precision, concentration and/or ample drying time.

 

I never wait on someone else to decide how productive I’m going to be, or need to be. That’s my call, really. That’s my responsibility as a professional.

 

And, frankly? If you do consider yourself a professional, and you do enjoy painting and decorating for a living, being highly productive will come as naturally as skillfully manipulating paintbrush.

 

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High productivity is a matter of conscious and conscientious choice – and unconscious commitment.

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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