Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

The time comes for every staff or facility painter to change the way he or she does certain things.

 

13 Reasons that may have you thinking – and thinking some more.

 

  1. Steadily plummeting budget puts a greater long-term squeeze on prioritizing essential tasks, work orders and projects.
  2. Way too much work load exists for the hours in your week.
  3. The new chief engineer on board believes in change and shaking things up a lot.
  4. The new chief engineer on board tends to fight your every move and decision.
  5. The external management company has its own ideas, policies and practices on how things must be done.
  6. The engineering staff has been cut. You will need to help out more with general maintenance tasks, work orders and troubleshooting.
  7. Your work hours have been cut. You’ll need to cut back – weed out – some duties.
  8. The new management is not happy with your current system.
  9. You may have access to more, or less, help from teammates.
  10. The business may have changed, calling for you to change with it.
  11. A shift in job description responsibilities requires you to add some, and let go of other, tasks.
  12. The business climate in the area may have improved, or turned sour.
  13. You may be burning out, disillusioned, or ready for something new, but where you’re at now. Making a move – changing jobs – may not be on your radar.

 

The real challenge may be in convincing yourself that the time to change your own practices has arrived. Answering three questions seems to help me along:

 

  1. Specifically, who is asking me to change the way I do things? Does the person know anything about how a paintshop needs to operate?
  2. On a scale of 1-10, how crucial is it that I change the practice or practices now, or at all?
  3. What are the advantages in making the change or changes now, versus in six months or a year from now?

 

My answers tend to be different, depending on which of my practices are on the chopping block, so to speak. With some? No big deal. Let’s make the change now. With others? Hands off till I can see how to do it that paintshop operations benefit, and do not suffer unnecessarily.

 

Bottom line: You’ll know what practice to change, and when the time is right for the paintshop. And you, too.

 

******************************************************************

A painter does not practice painting, like a doctor practices medicine.

A painter is expected to get it right the first time.

*****************************************************************

 

Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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