Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

Time: 9:00 am; Date: Monday, September 11, 2017. Seven hours after Hurricane Irma moved northward, residents of Central Florida assessed the damages and described their problems.

1. Problem: New, high-durability exterior paint stripped from much of exterior wood. Curled strips of paint hung from the rest of the structure. A dream home, completed three months before storm.
Painter’s recommendations: Replace wood if it’s been soaked by water. When surface is dry, apply two full coats of oil-based primer, using exterior wood filler and caulking where needed. Apply elasmeric coating if the surface is rough. Apply acrylic latex finish if the surface is typically smoother.

2. Problem: Over one-third of wooden rest areas dismantled, including seating, floors, banisters, rails and steps.
Painter’s recommendations: Replace entire area with pressure treated woods. Then stain or paint with oil-based exterior product.

3. Problem: Pool gazebo blown apart, looks like broken Tinker Toy or Lincoln Log set.
Painter’s recommendations: Replace wood, and match existing finish. Or replace the entire gazebo. Then apply a semi-transparent stain for a fast finish.

4. Problem: Ceiling over exterior, three-bay drive-through of hotel lobby’s entrance ripped off. Everything destroyed.
Painter’s recommendations: Install gunite system, then paint using exterior acrylic latex. Gunite is an optimum application, applied by an construction finish expert.

5. Problem: 75 percent of property’s fencing loosened from post braces. Sticky residue
covered manufacturer’s finish.
Painter’s recommendations: Reattach fence sections with fasteners, or use epoxy glue.
Remove residue with lacquer thinner, or non-acetone nail polish remover. Either has less chance of dulling the surface finish.

6. Problem:
Windows of 45 upgraded guest rooms blown out or broken. Rooms a big mess.
Painter’s recommendations: Clear each window frame of glass. Clear debris out of the room. Install temporary wood panels until new glass can be fitted. Repair wall or ceiling damage as necessary.

7. Problem: 130-year old tree uprooted, then toppled onto guest cottage.
Painter’s recommendations: This is an insurance job. Remove tree and cottage. Use part of tree to build something, maybe a custom table top with a rustic appeal.

My message was the same essentially for everyone:

“You’re going to need a lot more than painting. Before any painting can be scheduled.”
RECOVERY TIP: People need to identify and list damages, especially construction-wise. Before their insurance adjusters come to inspect and offer settlements.

PROBLEMS TO RESOLVE BEFORE PAINTING

1. All structural areas, exposed to flooding, water, and/or rain, had to be inspected for toxic
black and/or green mold/mildew; thoroughly dried out by industrial fans, then re-inspected.
Remove or thoroughly clean mold-infested surfaces. Then rinse with warm water. Let dry.

2. Structural areas, construction materials and substrates that emitted odors and/or fumes,
contained hazardous elements, looked discolored, and/or showed signs of 50 percent or more damage, had to be torn out, then removed from the property. According to EPA standards. NOTE: Hazmat (hazardous materials) specialists must be used to handle these removals.

3. Drywall surfaces which have gotten wet through the core must be cut out and replaced.

4. Water infiltration can also leave health-related contaminants which must be properly disposed of. Caution: This job may fall under EPA removal requirements.

5. When cleaning: Protect all skin, hands, face, eyes, etc. from exposure. Provide breathing protection to prevent illness and permanent damage. Example: Full-face breathing apparatus.

6. Limit exposure to paint and finishing chemicals, particularly if you have any breathing or respiratory problem such as asthma, bronchitis, sinusitis, or COPD. Use a full-face breathing apparatus, particularly if you must work around paint chemicals for an extended period of time, and/or frequently.

7. Rebuilding and upgrading is a job for licensed and insured outside contractors. Particularly, heavily damaged areas as described here. Examples of extensive work needed include: new electrical work and plumbing; ceiling and wall joists, drywall/plaster board; window and door frames, doors, cabinetry, fixtures, flooring; etc.

Structures and areas heavily damaged by wind, rain, flooding, toxic contaminants, spillage, waste seepage, etc. require a lot of work before any painter can come on board.

Rejuvination tends to be a long and expensive process. It cannot be rushed or done haphazardly. Many building codes, safety and health standards, and laws are involved. Also inspections.

Bottom line: If you’re a staff painter, you may not become involved at all in the major rebuilding of your hotel or facility. You may not want to be involved.

FOOTNOTE: After a tornado hit my grandparents’ large farm in 1946, they discovered that more than shingles and chimney bricks had disconnected from the house. Sections of plaster had popped (dislodged) from the ceilings and walls in every room. Behind painted and also wallpapered surfaces. My grandfather called it a “farmer-painter’s nightmare.”

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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