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Archive for the ‘Chief Engineer’ Category

Painter’s World: What You May Not Know About Black Mold

Never believe something cannot harm you just because you can’t see it. Just as a virus or bacteria can cause an infection, Black Mold fungi, offers its own type of threat to your health.

 

Basically, anything which is microscopic and exhibits the definition of being alive supports its own defense mechanism. And that’s against us.

 

Black Mold, or other similar fungi, produces spores which are unseen to the naked eye. During the stages of their metabolism, they produce by-products which are often toxic. These toxins interfere with the normal metabolism and respiration of humans.

 

WHAT YOU MAY NOT KNOW ABOUT BLACK MOLD

 

I didn’t know much about Fungi, Black Mold, Myotoxins, etc. until I started looking into it further. The following is a list of three of the most dangerous effects from mold exposure:

 

1. Mold inhalation – Decreased hemoglobin red blood cell concentration, lowered blood gas concentration, anemia, and bronchial and/or sinus inflammation and infection.

 Symptoms: Dizziness, muscle spasms-tremors, headaches, stressed breathing, clamped oxygen supply, runny nose, burning eyes, confusion, and blurred vision.

 

2. Mold Skin Contact AbsorptionAnemia, change in basal respiration rate, lowered blood gas concentration, subcutaneous pustules, lesions, and widespread rash.

Symptoms: Skin irritation, itching, burning, dizziness.

 

3. Long-Term Effects (most important) -Prolonged exposure that often causes an irreversible anemic health condition. Stem cell differentiation development within the bone marrow that’s affected by cases severe mold exposure. Change in the Hemostasis of hemoglobin/red cell relationship is altered.

***Secondary effects – Permanent respiratory illnesses such as chronic and/or acute Sinusitis, Bronchitis, Asthma, and Sinus tract cysts; irritation and/or inflammation of the mucus membranes. Also partial obstruction of the airway. Because of past exposure, susceptibility to allergic reactions from common dust and pollen.

 

HEALTH PREVENTION OF MOLD EXPOSURE

 

1. When cleaning: Wear protective suit, gloves and head covering; also proper respiratory equipment such as a charcoal, organic vapor respirator, or a self-contained, fresh air supply system. Note: Dust mask is totally inadequate.

2. If infestation is invasive: Use garden sprayer with 50/50 bleach-water, or peroxide solution. Spray infected area. Promptly remove yourself from the area until the solution has degraded the mold. Then you may clean and remove by hand what is left. When the removal of mold is completed, rinse entire area with fresh water – either by hand or with a garden sprayer.

3. Ventilate! Ventilate! Ventilate! In the area where you’re working, always provide adequate ventilation when spraying bleach or similar toxic chemicals. Open windows. And use circulating fans. The cleaning process will be much safer, and go much smoother.

 

IF AND WHEN YOU’RE EXPOSED TO MOLD…

 

1. Seek a clean, fresh air environment as soon as possible. Go outside if necessary.

2. Get help now! Someone needs to assist you and call “Emergency 911” and “Poison Control” – your chief engineer,  security director, member of management, teammate.

3. If you suffer a rash or burn of any kind, use a baking soda/water solution, calamine lotion, or a hygienic glycerol soap to help reduce skin irritation.

4. In severe cases, it may be necessary to get a steroid injection. This depends on whether or not your entire body is affected.

 

IN THE CASE OF MOLD EXPOSURE…

…what you don’t know will hurt you.

 

1. I developed both chronic and acute sinusitis from daily exposure to massive amounts of toxic levels of mold plus the toxic cleaning agents, over a period of six years.

2. On a daily basis, I took the proper precautions. I used the products and safety tools and equipment provided and authorized by the chief engineer, and property management and owners.

3. But the amount of mold was too great, for too long of a time.  According to health and environmental specialists, “a person could not have come out of it without suffering ill effects.”

4. The physicians have said I was fortunate. A strong majority of persons develop Asthma. In addition, a large number are also diagnosed, eventually, with Sinus and Bronchial Cancer, and/or Lung Cancer.

 

WHEN TREATING MOLD…

Whether at home or on the job, take your time. And work safely.

Take care of yourself and the others around you.

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Everyone wants to go home at the end of the day!

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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Call 911 First, Security Second. Override Policy.

Certain circumstances call for a staff member – eg. Painter – to phone 911 FAST! Then Security.

 
Some emergency situations on the job demand immediate action, whether the person is a teammate or manager, guest/visitor, vendor, or property’s owner. Your response must be quick, precise and necessary.

 

Call 911 or Chief of Security First. It’s Your Call – 11 Examples

 

  1. Trips, falls – especially involving blows to the head.
  2. Severe asthma attacks – clamped breathing.
  3. Adverse reactions to toxic exposure – lost vision, can’t breathe, immediate rash, swelling.
  4. Hazardous materials contact – eyes, skin, lungs.
  5. Stroke symptoms – face numb, speech slur, arm drop, lost balance, blurry vision, dizzy.
  6. Heart attack symptoms – chest/back/shoulder pain, dizziness, numbness, sweating, shortness of breath, nausea.
  7. Choking – Note: While waiting, Heimlich method may be wise action.
  8. Turning blue – any part of body. Also look for stopped breathing, numbness signs.
  9. Allergic reactions – Sudden swelling, rash, hives, clamped breathing.
  10. Paralysis, numbness, tingling – No time to hesitate!
  11. Heat illness symptoms – weakness, sweating, dizziness, dehydration, thirst, tremors.

 

Anyone who is experiencing any of the above symptoms, or any combination of them, requires immediate emergency help.

 

At least four times on the same job, I was in crisis. I suffered at least two of the above sets of symptoms. Other people were around in each instance. No one called 911. Care to guess what happened eventually?

 

3 REAL-LIFE COMPANY PAINTER CRISIS SITUATIONS

 

ONE. Joel was on the job less than a week. He’d moved to Florida to help care for his elderly parents. He noticed something wasn’t right the minute he removed the lid from a new gallon of paint. Sudden headache, problem breathing, burning eyes, itching skin.

 

“Latex is non-toxic,” he told himself.

 

When he got dizzy, he stumbled out of the hotel guest room. He yelled for help, and pushed the call button on the mobile. No one came.

 

TWO. Maria was considered one of the most fastidious housekeepers at the hotel. The director of her department had put her in charge of mold and mildew cleanups. She’d suffered mild mold fungi symptoms from Day 1 on the job, over 17 years ago.

 

Shortly after her fortieth birthday, she noticed the problems weren’t getting better. After every exposure to the mold, then the chlorine bleach cleaning agent, her eyes burned and wouldn’t focus. She experienced serious problems driving, reading, knitting, etc. Her chest muscles ached. She felt tired a lot. She developed skin rashes, even hives.

 

Less than one hour after clocking in one morning, she was washing walls down with bleach. She couldn’t get her breath. She got very dizzy, and started to pass out. She pushed her mobile phone button. No immediate response.

 

THREE. Curt dropped a box of full paint spray cans on his head. No big deal, he thought. He loaded up his golf cart, and sped toward the pool side gazebo, to get set up for the day. He felt a little weak, but got busy.

 

By 11:00 AM, he felt nauseous, light-headed, headach-y, and a strange pain around the neck. It was ninety degrees outdoors. He passed out. When he came to, three children stood over him. No one called for help. He got himself into an empty, air-conditioned guest room and spread out on a bed.

 

A “911” situation may not be that obvious at first. You may need to rely on your gut feeling, holler for help, then take a closer look for the other symptoms.

 

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The life you save may be very precious to someone else. Act! Don’t hesitate to help!

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Thank you for reading “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Paintshop: Equipping Engineering Techs with Right Paint Colors

My biggest staff painter challenge was ensuring that the other engineering techs to use the correct paint products for handling “painter” work orders on my days off. Mainly touching up surfaces in guest rooms and visible public areas.

 

They had neither the “eye” nor the time to match paint products in the shop to the paint colors of smaller areas needing repainting.

 

Yes, it was easy for them to find all of the cans of yellow latex paint, for instance. A paint chip was displayed on the lid of each container. And, it was easy to identify which cans of yellow paint had been used in the guest room originally in Building Two.

 

However, it was difficult to select the exact matching tint of yellow latex needed to touch up a particular spot or wall in a particular room. One reason: Over time, the original paint color on the wall would have faded or discolored. Why: Due to sun exposure, repeated household chemical cleanings and/or surface damage.

 

In most instances, after returning from days off, I’d quietly re-touch up the “touch-ups.” No big deal was made about the error in paint color selection. Nothing was said about the added time that it took to back pedal, and redo painting work orders. And, I’d never say a word to the tech about the chief engineer’s or general manager’s related complaints.

 

Painters, here’s one method to simplify the paint color selection job for your techy teammates.

 

  1. Go through all of the paint cans in the shop.
  2. Create a chart showing a chip for every paint can you have.
  3. Take the paint chip chart along as you make your daily rounds – eg. guest rooms, public areas, activity rooms, offices.
  4. Match each chip to the surface/area that it matches, and notate information.
  5. Back in the shop, add surface, area/wall and room information to every paint can label in the place. Write date that you matched the paint chip to surface.
  6. Group and shelve the paint cans according to building and room/area.
  7. Put up a small “poster” to identify those products by area.
  8. Make up a quick-reference wall chart for your engineering teammates.
  9. Give each guy a little one-on-one tour of the paint can setup. Show how to use the set up to their advantage.

 

NOTE: My engineering teammates made it clear that they did not like the hassle they got from the bosses, hotel management and guests  about the use of the wrong paint products and/or colors.

 

FOOTNOTE: You are bound to run into this type of problem. It really can’t be prevented totally.

 

BEST PIECE OF ADVICE: Do your best to keep the paint products in the paintshop organized and easy to access. Also, go easy on your teammates. They’re just trying to cover for you when you’re unable to be there.

 

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Train your engineering teammates in the paint touch-up methods that work for everyone.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s View: Covering Up Toxic Mold Infestation

In Florida, more than a few hotels have redecorated all or most of their guest rooms and public areas to cover up a deeper problem. Example: Black mold infestation – Stachybotyry’s chartarum.

 

They’ve spent a lot of money to install new carpeting and tile, furniture and fixtures, window treatments and textiles, AC window units, fresh coats of paint, etc.

 

But none of it will eradicate “sick building syndrome,” the underlying challenge.

 

Black mold and mildew behind the walls, above the ceilings, inside pipes and duct work, under floors, behind cabinetry, etc.

 

To get rid of “sick building” conditions – specifically toxic black mold, the structure’s interior must be gutted. The drywall in all infested rooms and areas must be removed. Plumbing and piping must be torn out. Wall, ceiling and floor joists must be taken out.

 

The entire area must be mitigated and remediated. Aired out, dried completely, and treated for hazardous chemicals and toxins.

 

Painters cannot do this. It’s a job for the professionals in toxic and hazardous materials handling. It is a big job. A labor-intensive job. A dangerous job.

 

Take note: If the actual infested surfaces and elements are not removed. Painters, and other staff members, working in redecorated guest rooms and public areas will still be exposed to the dangerous toxins.

 

Eventually, because the climatic conditions do not self-correct nor reverse themselves, the harmful fungal infestations will work their way into the new drywall, carpeting, textiles and fabrics, piping/plumbing, ductwork and ventilation system, etc. Little-by-little, or alarmingly fast!

 

Then, the toxic black mold fungi will show its ugly face all over again.

 

That’s one reason why, on the national news, you will see big piles of torn drywall inside and outside of houses and commercial buildings damaged by floods, hurricanes, etc. That’s why you’ll see entire houses gutted, and fully exposed wall joists and ceiling frames.

 

Painters must use great caution if they must continue to work in rooms and buildings that have been redecorated, but still harbor the toxic black fungi.

 

MY ADVICE FROM PERSONAL EXPERIENCE

 

Every time you work in or near one of those areas, protect yourself. Still hidden somewhere is the same toxic fungi and infestation that you may have been responsible, previously, for treating.

 

  1. SUIT UP! Head-to-toe in a disposable plastic uniform and shoe covers (like surgeons wear).
  2. Wear disposable gloves with a wide, snug wristband, or that reach mid-forearm.
  3. Wear a hat.
  4. Wear a nose and mouth mask.
  5. Better yet: Use a free-standing breathing apparatus.
  6. Wear eye goggles that fit snugly.

 

Repeated, or prolonged, exposure to toxic black mold fungi should be avoided. The price that your body might have to pay tends to be much higher than you could have anticipated.

 

Most of you can’t afford – and don’t want – to skip around from workplace to workplace. And, in Florida, as well as other parts of the country, it’s hard to find a hotel property that does not have some kind of environmental problem.

 

So, please! Do whatever you can.  NO! Do whatever it takes – to protect yourself from the effects of toxic Black mold fungi infestation.

 

It’s a life-threatening and traumatic tragedy. Trust me!  The EPA, environmental experts and medical specialists can tell you all about it.

 

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The life you save from permanent damage by toxic black mold exposure could be your own!

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved

Painter’s World: The Pro-Labor of Painting

Understanding and implementing labor strategies should be important to everyone who has a job. That is, perhaps with the exception of management. They tend to look out for the needs of the company.

 

Yet, both sides need each other to keep the business in business. They need each other to get the work done in an efficient, qualitative and cost effective manner. When this employee-employer relationship disappears, your job disappears.

 

In the painting trade, which is similar to all labor-intensive trade, the worker expects a fair wage for a reasonable day’s work. Employers expect and work hard to get as much work out of their employees as possible. I agree, as long as the employees’ health and safety are given the attention they deserve.

 

As a painter, what do you really want in the workplace? If asked, I would say (1) to feel appreciated, (2) to be respected, and (3) to be treated as a professional.

 

How are these objectives achieved?  From the standpoint of the employer-employee relationship?

 

1. Professional treatment. As the painter/employee, you know your job and what is required in order to keep it. And, on a consistent basis, you make every effort to perform your tasks in a responsible, productive manner.

 

2. Respect. As the painter/employee, you need certain provisions to be in place. Some of the more important ones include the respect and consideration of the employer, the tools to do the work, and enough time to do the work properly. (About tools: To start, painters need good quality brushes, roller covers, and reliable spray equipment.)

 

3. Appreciation. As a painter/employee, you have the right to have a safe, non-threatening environment in which to work. Both you and your employer have the responsibility to make sure it exists.

TIP A: When the employer drags his heels, be patient. And, try to find out why. Is it due to the cost and an unavailable budget? Consult your supervisor first; then your management or employer. It may be due to the cost of making it so.

TIP B: Don’t dismiss the need to pursue any possible resolution to the problem (s). Be patient.

TIP C: In an extreme case –eg. high toxicity, hazardous chemicals – OHSA (Occupational Health and Safety Administration) can guide you in the best direction.

 

4. Productivity issues. Organize an employee meeting as a group with your supervisor. Clearly (and truthfully) explain anything which keeps you from doing your job efficiently. CAUTION: Don’t blame or accuse anyone personally. Be tactful.

 

5. Wage/Salary issues. Fair wage/ salary is also on a painter’s mind. Don’t think about how much the company is making, or the salary raises for management. Instead, make known the value of your service to the company. Emphasize how you strive to do your best every day.

TIP A: If you must self-pay 100 percent of your health insurance, politely indicate that an increase in wage would be greatly appreciated.

 

 Now, using a more tactical response…

 

First, make sure you are doing all that you can to comply with company policy, productivity and employee regulations. If that fails to help you achieve any goals, follow one or all of the following objectives. NOTE: Some are more proactive than others.

 

1.Prepare yourself for presenting your concerns and issues.

 

TIP A: Write down a list of employee rights that your employer has denied you, and possibly others in the workforce. Make sure they are entitlements guaranteed under the law. Examples: lunch time (30 minutes or more), break availability, extended break time if necessary, compensation for work-related supplies, uniform requirements, workmen’s compensation, employer insurance payments, etc.

TIP B: Read then reread the company’s operations manual, if they issued one. Carefully make a note of any discrepancies or contradictions in their policies and procedures. Especially any that specifically relate to your department, or any other department with which you deal regularly.

TIP C: Compile definitive proof of misconduct on the part of the employer. File in a secure place.

TIP D: Find out the concerns and issues of other staff painters that you know in the region. What grievances do you share, and to what extent?

NOTE: In this process, your employer will probably look for ways to discredit you, starting with your attendance record.

CAUTION: It’s probable that you will lose your job sooner than later, be demoted, or be moved into another position at a different, less desirable location.

 

2. Ultimate response in labor relations. The painter/employee and employer relationship is based on group strength and unity. A number of painters standing together over a legitimate health and safety, or wage, issue can get better results with the employer, especially when you possess concrete and well supported evidence.

TIP A: It’s very possible that, through negotiation and mediation, a fair settlement can be achieved. Resulting in a win-win-win solution for everyone.

CAUTION: The painters may win the case; but they may have difficulty finding new jobs.

 

3. File a formal grievance. Depending on your issue, start with the following: Federal Wage Board/U. S. Department of Labor, OHSA, and EEOC. There are other agencies and organizations that may like to know about your problem.

CAUTION A: Especially when employee safety and health are concerned, fines could be levied until the employer sees fit to comply with the law. Some employers will initiate positive changes promptly. They do not want Federal sanctions on their books. Others will drag their heels, pay the fines at will, and refuse to comply.

CAUTION B: In the painter’s case, he may win or lose. This depends on whether or not the employer wants to do the right thing and improve working conditions.

CAUTION C: The employer may do nothing about the situation. But the employer will find probable cause to terminate you. Example: Employers, in any defendant’s hot seat, tend to shift the responsibility and costs to you. They will brand you as an difficult employee.

 

4. Promptly, locate another job. And resign from your present one.

CAUTION A: You may lose out. Especially if you like your current job, have a solid work record and possess growth opportunities.

CAUTION B: Consider that your job may not be secure at that point. The employer may have already been planning to hire someone to replace you.

 

5. Consider the option to start your own business. Especially if you have a good-to-excellent reputation in the field, possess some great connections and can float a low cash flow for two-to-five years before realizing a net profit. It can be a new beginning where you have control.

CAUTION A: Just remember that you become the employer now, just in case you hire anyone. Think of what you went through.

CAUTION B: Do you want, and are you able, to function well on the other side of the employer-employee scale?

 

BOTTOM LINE: As the labor-employee side of work, you must live up to your responsibility as designated by the employer. If not done, this will produce grounds for discipline or dismissal.

 

Your best asset is your service record. It can be a powerful, high-leverage weapon, when you are negotiating.

 

Validate your position. Hold your ground. Rally for support. And press on. Labor relations is about strength and commitment.

 

Points to Ponder:

  1. What do you have at stake in pursuing any grievance? Examples: current job; chances for promotion; wage/salary increases; benefit upgrades; growth opportunities in your field with other employers, or as an independent; family finances.
  2. Can you afford the potential short-term and long-term losses, and fallouts?

 

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Thank you for reading “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Paintshop: Hind-sight Hurricane/Natural Disaster Preparedness

As Hurricane Matthew sauntered to the eastern coast of Florida, the adrenaline kicked in. The list of survival strategies woke me before dawn the day before it was expected to hit land. My feet hit the carpet in a sprint to complete the tasks on our preparedness list.

 

My sister is a veteran preparer for and survivor of category 4 or 5 hurricanes. A pro by my definition, she not only shoulders the responsibility for securing a large home. Also she is responsible for fifteen retail stores in Florida.

 

I, on the other hand, have only four major hurricanes under my belt. With number 5 – Matthew – on its way.

 

 

Major Hurricane/Storm Preparedness Tips for Hotel/Facility Painters

 

1. Throw into dumpster everything that you should have discarded before now.

 

2. Try to prioritize supplies, tools and equipment as follows:

A. Which do you and teammates use the most?

B. Which would be the hardest to replace?

C. Which would cost the most to replace?

    TIP: Then, secure all of the above the best that you can. Get some help to do this.

 

3. TIP: Keep some recovery-type tools accessible such as hammers, screw drivers, battery-operated drills, and heavy duty flashlights.

 

4. Move everything down inside the paintshop. Onto the floor and into the corners of each room in the shop. In the heaviest storage cabinets – solid steel or heavy wood, move items onto the bottom shelves.

 

5. Make certain that all containers’ lids and covers are very tight. You don’t want the wind’s force to blow or pop off paint and solvent can lids. You don’t want it to work off solvent container caps; caulking tube covers, adhesive bucket lids, etc. Note: Minimize your potential clean-up mess as much as possible.

 

6. Use duct tape to tape shut the inside plastic wrapping/tube that houses rolls of wallcoverings. Then, use duct tape to tightly close outer shipping box of each roll. Then, either move boxes of wallcoverings into corners of inside wall closet, or the inner corners of paintshop or restroom.

 

7. Pack away all small, loose tools. Store in base cabinet drawers. Use heavy wire to double tie drawers shut. If drawers run side-by-side, or in column fashion, run steel pipe rod down through all handles. NOTE: New Orleans hotel painter used this in Katrina, and said it worked great.

 

8. Secure small, hand power tools. Tightly wrap and secure electric cords. Stuff tools into heavy storage cabinets (see no. 2), or into drawers (see no. 5). TIP: Wrap heavy-duty freezer bag around electric cord of each tool.

 

9. Pack away all large tools, including their power cords. Place in heavy storage cabinet, or empty 55-gallon steel paint drums. TIP: Hotel painter in South Florida secures a heavy-duty freezer bag a round cord of each power tool.

 

10. Place ladders flat on the floor along an inside wall.

 

11. Then, with extra manpower, push or place all heavy equipment on top of the ladders.

 

ALTERNATE TIP to NO. 8 and No. 9:

12. Lay ladders out, one side frame facing you. Then place against an inside wall.

13. Then, with help, push or place heavy equipment against ladders.

CAUTION: Please take special precautions with everything containing glass, very sharp parts, etc.

 

Bottom line: Safety is key. You want to minimize the risk of anyone getting injured (or killed) because of a container, glass, tool, ladder, etc. becoming air-bourne and aiming for a helpless human.

 

Hotel/facility painters and maintenance teammates face the threat of different natural disasters, based on the region of the country in which they work. Many of these events are similar. They feature elements such as very strong, whipping winds; blinding rains and flooding; and extreme temperatures.

 

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s View: Keeping Connected After the “Compensated” Connection is Gone

One full year after my grandfather retired from his pastorate, he began to rekindle the closer friendships built, over twenty-five years, with certain people and families in that parish. While still maintaining a separation from them as members of the church family, he moved forward with his personal bond with them.

 

Moving forward…

 

Nearly nine years after his death at age 93, his descendants continue some of those connections with the members’ descendants. We exchange e-mails, letters and phone calls.

 

One of them is a commercial painting contractor. His oldest son is a staff painter on a Marriott property in the Washington, D. C. area. All three of us are experienced painters and decorators. Yet, we seem to be more drawn to each other by our connection through that church parish in southern Indiana.

 

Question: In the business or professional world, is it appropriate to keep connected?

 

Is it acceptable to keep in touch with former coworkers or teammates, supervisors and managers? At all times respecting their prevailing positions as staff members of your previous place of employment?

 

  1. Some companies maintain a policy that, once an employee leaves, he or she is prohibited from any and all contact with anyone there. And, they strictly enforce that rule.

 

  1. Some companies maintain a policy of marginal latitude. They allow current and former employees to keep a limited connection to each other. Trusting that both sides will preserve, respect and honor the employee’s current contractual terms with the employer. Especially in confidentiality areas.

 

  1. Some companies rely on their current employees to use sound judgment, fairness and cordiality when dealing with their former coworkers. And, they trust them to set suitable, reasonable terms in sustaining those relationships.

 

  1. A handful of companies, by comparison, actually promote qualitative, mutually beneficial connections between and among current and former employees. The view of leaders and enterprises is:

 

“What’s good for their people can be very good for the business.”

 

Within which policy framework do you, as a former coworker, do you function?  Within which framework do you, as a current coworker, function?

 

Question: How does it strengthen your ability to be a top quality worker? And, a fulfilled, well-rounded human being?

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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