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Archive for the ‘Colors and tints’ Category

Paintshop: Decorative Painting Brushes and Tools

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DECORATIVE PAINTING TOOLS in PHOTO ABOVE.*

 

No. 1. Steel combs. Uses: Dragging, wood graining.

No. 2. Palette knife. Uses: Mixing artist’s acrylics or oils; scraping away paint, glaze in areas.

No. 3. Dragging Brush/overgrainer. Features: natural bristles one side, thick nylon bristles other.

No. 4. Badger-hair Brush. Uses: Smoothing oil glaze.

No. 5. Long-haired Spalter. Size 80. Uses: Smoothing oil glaze.

No. 6. Short-haired Spalter. Size 100. Uses Applying oil glaze, then smoothing it.

Nos. 7-8. Small Spalter/Mottlers. Sizes 40, 50. Uses: Wood graining, smoothing oil glaze.

Nos. 9-10. Toothed Spalters. Special oil brushes. Uses: Wood graining.

Nos. 11-12. Small, flat Brush/white nylon. Uses:Marbling, touch-ups, freehand painting acrylics.

No. 13. Small pointed round Brush/white bristles. Uses: Touch-ups, thicker veining marbling techniques with acrylics.

No. 14. Flat long-haired Brush/nylon. Uses: Marbling, fine detailing in acrylics.

No. 15. Long-haired Brush/nylon. Uses: Marbling with acrylics.

No. 16. Small pointed Brush/nylon. Uses Fine veining when marbling with acrylics.

No. 17. Long-haired Ox-Hair Brush. Uses: Marbling, woodgraining, freehand script and ornamentation (lines of varying thicknesses). TIP: Best with oils.

Nos. 18-19. Flat, White Bristle Brush. Uses: Marbling, woodgraining, corner touch-ups with oil-or-water-based paints.

No. 20. Flat long-haired Badget Lettering Brush. Uses: Marblig, freehand painting. TIP: Oils.

No. 21. Ox-hair Sign Painter’s Brush. Features: Long-hair cut flat at end. Uses: Marbling, freehand (for clean edges) in oils or acrylics.

Nos. 22-24. Stencil Brush. Feature: White bristles, slightly softer. Uses: With oils or acrylics.

No. 25. Round/oval thick nylon Brush. Uses: Spattering; coating thin, curved surfaces.

No. 26. Flat nylon Brush. Uses: Paint latex base coat, also acrylic glazes; baseboards, chiseling.

No. 27. Angled nylon Brush/nylon. A better quality brush. “Pre-used” in factory, leaves fewer marks. Uses: Latex painting, cutting in lines, hard-to-reach surfaces.

No. 28. Small flat, long-haired Brush/white bristles Uses: Oil paints.

No. 29. Flat 2 1/2–inch Brush/white bristles. Uses: Oil-base coating; squared-off ends; general purpose; precision edges,/trims.

Nos. 30-32. Round Bristles/white. Uses: Oil glazing; oil-based painting. TIP: Use separate brushes for separate functions.

No. 33. Well-worn round Brush. Uses: Stirring paints.

 


Decorative painting can create warm, personal spaces from bland, contemporary walls. It can create focal points out of any surface such as doors, trim, woodwork, even ceilings. It can create masterful heirlooms from worn, discarded furniture. It can transform jeweled and gold-leafed treasures from thrift shop and yard sale finds.

 

Decorative painting – creating the “right surfaces” – can make a room, area or piece come alive.

 

  1. Underscore or downplay its assets, and camouflage its drawbacks.
  2. Add new life, a new feel.
  3. Blend the old with the new – family antiques with store bargains.
  4. Make newer surfaces appear very aged, hundred-to-centuries old.
  5. Create a special, and different, touch with every applications, every tool on every surface.

 

With decorative painting, you can create a signature piece from every piece.

Decorative painting differs from standard interior painting in three distinct ways:

 

  1. Paints used. On top of two layers of interior paint, you apply two thin coats of transparent paint – “Glaze” – that you mix, then tint to the desired hue.
  2. Colors. At the heart of decorative painting, especially when carefully chosen and properly mixed. Produced by blending wet paints on palette, then placing translucent layers atop an opague base/ Result: Resonance, depth, a subtle glow as mixing.
  3. Pattern. The way you apply glaze contributes to uniqueness of each application. Using a wide array of tools, multiple shapes and sizes. You manipulate the glaze while wet to form patterns or different broken-color effects (eg. ragging, combing, sponging, flogging).

 

Decorative painting calls for creativity, skill, and patience. It alls for paint and finishing products that suit the surface and areas. It calls for the appropriate tools to achieve the desired pattern, texture, finish, and effect.

 

IS DECORATIVE PAINTING A GOOD OPTION FOR A SURFACE WHERE YOU PAINT?

 

Are guests of your hotel ready for unique surroundings and surface embellishments?

Are the patients and staff of your hospital looking for alternatives to the opague paint colors on the walls and in public areas?

Are your commercial clients seeking a personalized alternative to wallpaper?

Or, does your private customer want something other than the area rug to dress up a wood floor?

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* Photo and descriptions from: Recipe for Surfaces: Decorating Paint Finishes Made Simple. Text by Mindy Drucker and Pierre Finkelstein.** Photographs by Tony Cenicola. Copyright 1993, Quarto Inc., Fireside Books, Simon and Schuster, N.Y., pp. 42-43.

Mindy Drucker is a freelance writer, specializing in design and home decoration topics. Pierre Finkelstein is a master decorative painter. He is recognized worldwide for his skill in applying standard, matching existing and creating custom finishes. Born in Paris, he owns Grand Illusion Decorative Painting, Inc., New York City.

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“Painting with Bob” appreciates that you are following.
Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting in Purple: Rooms for Three Pals

Within a two-block radius live three elementary-age girls. Each is being reared by her natural father or grandfather, or an adoptive step-grandfather.

 

They’re the type of children for whom you want to do what you can to brighten their lives. And, they have the type of guardians you want to help, too.

 

So, what can a painter do for remarkable neighborhood girls like them?

And, how can a painter help out their caring and hardworking parental figures?

 

WELL, HE OR SHE CAN PAINT!

 

All of the girls lived in rented duplexes. Thus, redecorating needed to conform to the tenant rules of the respective property owner. Paint colors and products had to be selected and used that would be (a) easy to recoat when the current tenants moved, or (b) color-compatible with a new tenant’s needs.

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And, the products had to be child-safe. Non-toxic, non-flaking, non-flammable, non-“rub-offable.” Washable, too!

   

STARTING POINT: CHOOSING THEIR COLORS

 

All three girls loved the color “PURPLE!”

 

All three girls chose their paint colors from Glidden’s® “Make It Magical with Disney” line.

(For information: www.disneypaint.com.)

 
Girl No. 1’s Room:

  1. WALLS: Base Color no. WDMN05, Color name: Minnie’s Gloves (white).
  2. Special effects: 3 horizontal wrap-around stripes, two adjacent walls. Top/4-inches: Color no. WDMN04, Color name: Adorable Daisy. Middle/6-inches: Color no. WDMN08, Color name: Bow-tique Beauty. Bottom/12-inches: Color no. WDMN09, Color name: Purple Cuteness.
  3. DOORS/TRIM: Color no. WDMN04. Color name: Adorable Daisy.

 

Girl No. 2’s Room:

  1. WALLS: 3 walls: Color no. WDFY04, Color no. Vidia Purple; 1 wall, bookcase and closet: Color no. WDPR03 (white), Color name: A Wave of the Wand.
  2. Special effects: 4 to 8-inch diameter circles, positioned in shooting star effect from white wall onto adjoining right-hand closet wall. Color no. WDFY05, Color name: Fairy Flight; Color no. WDFY09, Color name: Pixie Purple.
  3. DOORS/TRIM: Color no. WDFY05, Color name: Fairy Flight.

 

Girl No. 3’s Room:

  1. WALLS: 4 walls: Color no. WDPR03 (white), Color name: A Wave of the Wand.
  2. Special effects: 2-inch wrap-around border: Color no. WDFY09, Color name: Pixie Purple.
  3. DOORS/TRIM: Color no. WDFY09, Color name: Pixie Purple.
  4. WOOD FURNITURE: Color no. WDFY03 (white), Color name: A Wave of the Wand.

Special effects: Tops of desk, 2 nightstands, 6-drawer dresser: Faux Swirl Pattern: Color no. 1: WDFY05, Color name: Fairy Flight (pastel lilac); Color no. 2: WDFY01, Color name: Tinker Bell (mint green); Color no. 3: WDFY09, Color name: Pixie Purple.

 

Paint and finishing products

 

Paint products: Semi-gloss and Gloss latex. Manufacturer: Glidden’s.

Stain and finish coat products: Miniwax.

 

First Things First: Scheduling and Clearing Out Rooms.

  1. Painting schedule: Week days (for each), when respective family gone for day.
  2. Clearing out: Adults (household and friends) removed wall posters, banners, pictures. They also removed table lamps, small chairs, mirrors, small shelving units; toys, stuffed animals, games; clothing and personal stuff; bed linens, pillows, curtains, small area rugs, etc.

 

Paint Project Process for Each Bedroom.

  1. Vacuuming: Room and closet. Thoroughly! Also, cleaning/dusting all furniture to be painted.
  2. Prepping: Minor patching, filling small cracks and nail holes; light sanding.
  3. Finish painting: One coat.
  4. Paint method: Smooth.
  5. Desired finish effect: Fresh, color-chip match; distinctive. New!

 

Special touches for each girl’s room, donated by groups of neighbor ladies.*
* New coordinated and washable cotton blend curtains.

* New quilted coverlets or bedspreads, and decorator pillows with removable covers.

* Two complete sets of coordinating bed linens, and 1 set of bath linens.

 

Large area rugs, donated as follows:

Girl No. 1’s Room: 9-ft. x 12-ft., Donors: Out-of-town relatives.

Girl No. 2’s Room: 12-ft. x 12-ft., Donors: Deceased mother’s aunt.

Girl No. 3’s Room: 12-ft. x 15-ft., Donors: Group of grandfather’s friends.

Biggest reason to take on a joint project like this?

Three girls starting out in life, and their three guardians who are willing to sacrifice a lot help them take each step into the future.

 

Thanks for doing what you do, including painting, to make life better for someone else.

 

Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: Susika’s “First Real Bedroom”

 

Susika was a ten-and-a-half year old when we met. Her aunt and U. S. Marine uncle had brought her home with them, after the mass family funeral in the Middle East. On the plane, they promised her a “real bedroom.”

 

Uncle “J.J.” and several handy friends knocked out a wall to add six feet to the small 10-feet by 9-feet space.

 

Here’s how they outfitted what Susika called her “first real bedroom.”

 

  1. On 15-feet window wall: Built in a window seat, with bookshelves on each end, and two roomy, half-cupboards underneath.
  2. On each side of window seat unit: A roomy closet: one for clothes, the other for her “stuff.”
  3. On other three walls: Wall rails and one-half wainscoting.
  4. Floor covering: Wall-to-wall, commercial grade carpeting: Colors: Pastels in pink, rose, cranberry, mint green, forest green. Pattern: Splashes and Swirls.
  5. Bed Furniture: Wood twin bed, 6-drawer dresser, 2 night tables. From uncle’s elderly neighbors.
  6. Old wooden desk and chair. Shared by her mother and “J. J.” as children.
  7. Small arm chair. Once used by older cousin, now in college.
  8. Toy chest. Originally belonged to her uncle.
  9. Bean bag chair, vinyl. Color: Hot pink. New. A gift from that cousin in college.
  10. Four-shelf, three-drawer unit. For stuffed animals and dolls. Yard sale purchase.
  11. Bulletin-White board. For hanging above desk. Purchased at Wal-Mart.

MY JOB: Paint and finish coat everything paintable. And, there was a lot.

 

Susika chose her new room’s paint colors from Glidden’s® “Make It Magical with Disney” line.

(For information: www.disneypaint.com.)

Color scheme: Soft white, pastel pinks and greens, also tinted forest green.

Paints used: Interior semi-gloss and high-gloss latexes; also artist acrylics.

 

SURFACES and AREAS, COLORS

 

Ceiling: Glidden Color No. WDPR03. Color: A Wave of the Wand. Finish: Popcorn textured.

Upper and built-in walls, closets: Color No. WDPR03. Color: A Wave of the Wand (tinted Pink).

Rails, vertical wood wainscoting, doors, trim; also window and cupboard doors: Color No. WDPR08. Color: Fairest of Them All.

Furniture: Color No. WDPR10. Color: Water Lily.

33-year old 4-shelf/3-drawer unit: Base coat Color No. WDPR03. Color: A Wave of the Wand; Glazed Top coat: Color No. WDPR10 Color: Water Lily. Faux application: Random sponging.

Tops of dresser and night tables: 2-coat Faux glaze. Coat 1: Color No.: WDPR10. Color: Water Lily; Coat 2: Color No. WD FY05. Color: Fairy Flight. Faux application: Sponging, Ragging.

Built-ins and Window Seat Wall: Natural Stain; Sealer/Finish coat: Low-gloss polyurethane.

 

The entire painting project took a little more than a week. I used a large, cleaned out shed to re-finish the furniture pieces. It was equipped with central A/C. All other surfaces and areas were primed and finish-coated inside of the room.

 

PRODUCT MANUFACTURERS
Paints-Primers, finish coats: Glidden’s “Make It Magical with Disney.”

Stains, finish coats: Miniwax sealers, stains, varnishes, polyurethanes.

Artist Paints/Detailing: Liquitex Acrylics.

 

Painting and decorating children’s rooms is a lot of fun. Especially, when the painter is included in the project from the theme, design, color, and pattern selection stage.

  1. Every project is different. Every child’s preferences and needs are unique.
  2. The elements – theme, design, color, pattern – vary a lot.
  3. The products and materials used, in combination, are always one-of-kind.
  4. Working creatively within the budget draws on untapped energy, imagination and resources.
  5. A special sense of satisfaction bubbles forth as a child’s “special space” takes shape.

 

ABOUT SUSIKA
Susika’s completed room was very special for an added reason. She was a war orphan, legally adopted by her only living adult relative: an American military officer. Susika’s mother, the military officer’s sister, was an American educator that taught the children of enlisted officers stationed in the Middle East. Her father was a U. S. educated Middle Eastern professor and administrator.

 

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“My own room! It’s like having my private place in Heaven.”   Susika

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Thank you, fellow painters and decorators, for brightening the lives of others.
And, thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Kathy’s Creative Carpeting Solution

Kathy U. needed new living room carpeting. With five active children and a busy contractor husband, the stone-fireplaced area took a beating.

 

Big problem: The family’s budget couldn’t cover that size of expense.

 

Challenge: So, the Porter County artist, homemaker and volunteer got creative!

 

Solution: Basically, here’s how Kathryn re-carpeted the room with a Currier & Ives picturesque view of the countryside.

 

  1. She selected a basic patchwork quilt color scheme.
  2. She designed a simple block pattern of squares and rectangles.
  3. For months, she haunted area carpet stores, warehouses, installation companies, etc. and purchased, or was given, over 150 remnants with similar fibers, weaves and backing
  4. She sorted the remnants by color-hue family, into large separate cardboard boxes.
  5. Next, she laid the pieces onto the bare floor, by this time stripped of the original worn carpeting. She paid close attention to placing colors and pieces so they complemented each other. And, their weaves all went in the exact same direction.
  6. Settling on the color-pieces arrangement, she consulted with the family. “Yes,” they agreed. It was a “GO, Mom!”
  7. Starting at one corner, she turned over each piece and wrote a number on its backing.
  8. Based on each remnant’s size, she drew a grid on the room’s floor space, using a carpenter’s pencil.
  9. On grid paper – 1-inch equals 1 foot – she transferred her remnant pattern. Inside each block on the grid paper, she wrote (a) its length and width and (b) number of remnant to fit there.
  10. She purchased many spools of heavy carpet thread through a carpet installation business.
  11. Starting at the far, lowest traffic corner of the floor, she replaced each numbered remnant on its matching numbered grid block. She made certain that the weave/grain of all pieces went in the same direction.
  12. On the backing of each piece, she drew its grid measurements, allowing a ¾-inch “seam” on each side.
  13. Using a carpet cutter, she spliced each remnant along the marked cutting lines.
  14. As she cut each piece, she replaced it to its numbered spot on the gridded floor.
  15. After all pieces had been cut and laid out, she double-checked for proper dimensions, color conformity, and weave direction. (See no. 11 above.)
  16. Over a period of six months, she hand-stitched the carpet pieces together. Note: A very tough job. Kathy said it was “hard on the fingers, wrists, elbows, knees, and back!”
  17. Word leaked out about the woman’s unique creative project: the hand-sewn patch quilt carpet. Area media took photos of the newly carpeted room, and published or aired stories on Kathryn U.
  18. Friends, neighbors and relatives appeared for the open house when Kathryn unveiled the beautiful hand-stitched, wall-to-wall carpet.

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Necessity may be the mother of invention, but a creative soul is the mother of true art.

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Thank you for taking a pause to visit “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016, 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: Restoring an Antique Finish

If you are looking to retain the value of an antique, do not restore the finish. Leave it as it is.

 

If the future dollar value doesn’t impress you, a new finish, if done properly, will revive an old and worn out look into a complete marvel. Just don’t take it to Antiques Roadshow.

 

Primarily, I recommend “refinishing” to those individuals who have no intention of selling or trading off their antiques. When a particular item is to remain in your home, its condition sould be of significant importance.

 

Too, you may be interested in restoring it to preserve the integrity of the piece.

 

In order to judge it properly, you will need to assess the exact needs of the object. Examine the following:

 

  1. Are there any structural repairs that need to be done? Examples: wood- veneer replacement, re-molding fabrication, joinery, etc.
  2. What is the condition of the hardware? Examples: glass, handles, knobs, hinges. Do they need replacement or reconditioning?
  3. Does it need a thorough cleaning? Recommended: Citrus type cleanser or mild detergent.
  4. What is the condition of the stained, clear-finished surface? Is there an uneven stain pattern? Are there defects in the clear coat (crazing, alligatoring, cracking, etc.)?

 

METHODS OF ANTIQUE SURFACE RE-FINISHING

 

You can remove aged or failed finishes in one of two ways:

  1. Dry sand surface, using # 80-#120 grit sandpaper, depending on the roughness of surface.
  2. Apply varnish remover to loosen all layers of finish. Key here: Treat the surface gently. Try not to scratch the wood at all, or too deeply.

 

BASIC STEPS FOR REFINISHING AN ANTIQUE SURFACE

 

  1. Clean the surface. Use lacquer thinner, or another high evaporating type solvent. Let this dry thoroughly.
  2. Determine the color of stain that you wish to use. Based on the lightness of the stain, you may have to bleach the wood so that the new product can penetrate the surface evenly.
  3. When the surface is dry, apply stain using a two-coat application with a rag and/or sponge. Let dry between coats.
  4. After 24 hours, apply multiple, thin coats of sanding sealer or shellac using spray method. Sand surface between coats, and use tack cloth.
  5. Select either a solvent-based varnish or polyurethane, or an acrylic clear coat as a top coat.
  6. Apply several finish coats by using an HVLP spray system. Lightly sand between each coat. At this point, you can use either a # 400 grit sandpaper, or emery cloth.
  7. After the surface has cured 48 hours, you may apply a polish or wax, specifically designed for wood.

 

In refinishing quality antique pieces, try to prevent scratching the wood surface. The general idea is to remove as little of the existing finish as is necessary. TIP: If a stain color change is planned, the bare wood tone after stripping must be as uniform as possible.

 

Also, by selecting a matte varnish or polyurethane finish, you will be able to camouflage any minor imperfections in the wood.

 

As a form of Nuveau furniture design, separate pieces of wood can be finished with completely different colors of stain and finish. Few people try this. But, the end result exceeds all others. It is highly decorative. And, it has similarities to the Folk Art style.

 

Finally, if you want to retain the full retail value on the antique market, don’t do anything to the piece, other than clean it. And do that very carefully!

 

Final notes: As I’ve learned, each antique piece presents its unique set of signs that it should not be refinished. Each piece presents its unique set of challenges to the person that will be refinishing and/or restoring the piece’s integrity. It is always wise to listen to both messages.

 

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Wise is the painter/finisher who respects the true, and deeper, character of each antique piece.

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Thank you for each visit that you’ve made to “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s View: Ten Spaces and Ten Reasons to Paint on New Year’s Week-end

New Year’s week-end is a great time to pick up a brush, and paint.

 

Because of the busy holidays, at least some of your regular schedule is probably still on hold. You’re in a more relaxed, “winding down” mode. And, you’re already psyched up to try new things, new ways.

 

 TEN REASONS TO PAINT ON NEW YEAR’S WEEK-END

 

  1. You may have more time off to paint things other than assigned work orders and tasks.
  2. Paint stores are running super pre-2017 sales.
  3. Many product manufacturers’ websites and apps are offering two-and-three-for-one discounts.
  4. Manufacturers are offering introductory discounts on paint products in the new 2017 colors.
  5. You may need a physical outlet to vent that holiday season stress.
  6. At work, your chief engineer may be more amenable to your doing that creative project that you’ve suggested.
  7. At home, the holiday spirit will still be wide open for creative expression.
  8. Your energy and enthusiasm levels are still at a high.
  9. Your willingness may be greater to accept a little help from your crew.
  10. You “need to paint this now” – while you’re in the mood.

 

 TEN SPACES TO PAINT ON NEW YEAR’S WEEK-END

 

  1. Rooms at home: a bathroom, bedroom, sun porch, study/den, attic room, sewing room.

TIP: Steer clear of high activity areas during the holidays – eg. kitchen, media room.

  1. Areas at home: workroom in basement or garage, garage/barn loft, small apartment, workshop.
  2. Rentals: apartment, loft, duplex unit; small house, condo or townhome.
  3. Home-based work space: office, writing/artist studio, computer room/alcove, assembly room.
  4. On-site work spaces: bosses’ offices and bathrooms, art gallery offices, shop offices; kitchen/lunch room; non-profit offices, workrooms, or restrooms.
  5. Furniture: simply designed chairs, table in good condition, smaller dresser/chest, bed, smooth-surface desk, picture/mirror frames; bookcases, storage units.
  6. Built-ins: eating nooks, window seat areas, bookshelves, cabinetry doors/frames, home office cubicle.
  7. Fun spaces: Jewelry/treasure boxes; children’s sleeping loft or playhouse; children’s toy chest; dollhouse, play barn/fort; doghouse.
  8. Elderly friend/relative space: front entry, living/dining area, bedroom, den/study, enclosed sun room; ALF/retirement community apartment or villa.

TIP: Pre-arrange for the resident to stay with a neighbor, relative or friend for the week-end. Or,              perhaps in your home?

  1. Your church: Unless the buildings are new, nearly every room/area may need a pro painter’s touch.

TIP: Look for smaller rooms that have been ignored or neglected aesthetically. Examples: Sunday             school rooms, library room, workroom, bulletin/newsletter/printing room, office workroom and storage rooms; kitchen/pantry; choir practice room and robe storage.

 

TOP TIP: Make it a project of your choice. Make it a do-good, do-well endeavor.

 

P. S. My New Year’s project: Applying matching faux finish pattern to two, curbside discarded, two-drawer metal file cabinets.

 

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Happy New Year, everyone. Enjoy. Stay safe. Be well.

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Here’s hoping to hear from you in the New Year – 2017.

Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob” during 2016.

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Paintshop: Selecting Paint Colors Using Online Chip Catalogs

Shopping for the best paint color for a surface or area is only a CLICK away. Via the internet, you can search any major or specialty paint manufacturer’s website.

 

And, you can access their complete color chip catalog, including each color’s name and product number.

 

Usually, the paint chips will be organized by color family. Also, they will be categorized by certain criteria.

 

  1. Surface – interior or exterior.
  2. Substrate – e.g. wood, masonry. Metal.
  3. Paint sheen/finish – e.g. flat/matte, eggshell , satin, semi-gloss, gloss, high-gloss.
  4. Paint type – e.g. latex, oil-base, acrylic latex, primer/finish duo.
  5. Environment/climate – eg. dry, wet, humid/tropic, cold.
  6. Unique features.
  7. Paint quality – e.g. good, superior, premium, heavy duty.

 

October and November tend to be the ideal time to CLICK on a paint manufacturer’s site for news about the new colors for the next year. Each color and each color combination will be shown in appropriate product-color-surface applications. By room or area.

 

EXAMPLE: Sherwin-Williams “Poised Taupe SW 6039.”

 

  1. Living room setting: The color may be shown on an accent wall.
  2. Dining room: Color may be used on the upper part of a dado wall, or old wooden chairs.
  3. Entertainment room: Color may be applied in alternate vertical stripes on a wall.
  4. Master bedroom suite: Color may be used on a recessed wall or alcove.
  5. House masonry exterior: Color may be used as predominant color, or trim color.

 

For real excitement, try the virtual, or 3-D visualization, capability available on most paint manufacturer’s sites.

 

  1. CLICK on the chip of color you are considering.
  2. CLICK on the type of room or area in which you want to use the color.
  3. See how the color might actually look.
  4. See how your chosen paint color might be combined with other colors for total effect.
  5. See how your color might look in rooms of different styles or with decor – eg. traditional, provincial, contemporary, eclectic.
  6. See how your color might look under different light exposures – eg. full sun, partial sun, partial shade, or full shade room or wall.

 

In my opinion: Nothing beats the visit to the paint store to find the exact color that you need.

 

Still, shopping online first can save a lot of time and money. And, when the color needs to be approved by someone else, a few strategic CLICKS and PRINTs in color can save you a lot  of grief – and repainting – later on.

 

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Chip away at correct color selection by first CLICKing on paint chips.

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Many thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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