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Painting Them: Hostels for Youth and Young Adults

In January of 2017, I will, for the first time, meet a third cousin from Rotterdam in the Netherlands. Frederich III is a professeur of microbiologie. He and five others have been invited to the United States to present papers on the impact of environmental changes upon our health.

 

Fred has two sons. They operate a large guest hostel located in a coastal city.

 

They employ a painter part-time. One of his jobs involves supervising youth and young adult “stay-overs,” who want to earn part of their room rates by doing some painting at the hostel.

 

Few of these young people have ever picked up a paint brush. Except, perhaps, an artist brush. So they do not know their capabilities in this area. Until they put a brush in one of their hands.

 

To make their possibly first painting experience a positive one, the hostel painter works them in pairs. Then, he lets them select, from a duty list, the small painting project they want to take on.

 

Most projects involve interior surfaces and areas. Repainting of the drywall parts of the ceilings, supported by huge rough-sawn beams. Filling, sanding and re-varnishing of the paneled walls in most sleeping rooms. Patching, sanding and refinishing of the hardwood floors, located throughout structure.

 

One of the biggest challenges is the repainting or refinishing of all surfaces in all public areas and “pass-through” corridors, as well as the miles and miles of dark oak stairs, railings, banisters, and trims. There’s a steady flow of traffic in and out of every area – 24 hours, seven days a week.

 

To help solve that problem and make it easier for the young guests to get the painting done, Fred’s boys developed a rotation system. Different two-person crews would be available to do painting at different times of the day or night. Translation: whenever a room or area became vacant for even a few hours.

 

Considering that most of the persons doing the work are novices – new to the craft, Fred says it’s been amazing to see how effective the system works. And, how qualitative the painting results have been.

 

“What about the outside?” I e-mailed Fred.

 

He said that the colder climate limits the exterior work that these young people are able to do. A few always come along, willing to put up with the elements while beautifying the outside of the building.

 

Four questions that will be answered later this month, with the help of the co-owners of the hostel.

 

1. How do the products used differ from those used in the U.S.?

2. How do the techniques or methods differ?

3. How do the average costs differ from those incurred in the U.S.?

4. How do the youth and young adult “painters” feel about the results they produce?

 

Fred, a silent partner in the hostel enterprise, already responded to Question 4. “They’re in surprise. Also, they express gratefulness for making some money to help pay for traveling expenses…”

 

Employing young hostel guests is not a new concept. Hostel operators around the world have,, for many years, employed them to work in the kitchen, restaurant/dining area and laundry. Employing them to handle repair and painting tasks and work orders is a newer pursuit.

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Travelers at any age can work their way to their destinations.

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Travel safe, travel well. Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: The Fast and Easy Way

Just to clarify things: Easy and fast is not necessarily the most recommended way to paint something. However, for everyone, we sometimes want things to go a little easier or to happen a little quicker.

 

Painting is no different. By taking some precautions, we can guarantee some degree of quality, no matter how fast or easy the work is. Having the right amount of skill is usually the ticket.

 

There are any number of items that can be painted the easy way, and as fast as you might want to complete them. Example: Using an airless spray system, I once prime finished just under 3000 linear feet of molding in less than an hour. When calculated using a brush and/or roller, it would have taken the entire day. Yes, a high level of productivity can be achieved daily, depending on the situation.

 

A FEW PREP-LEVEL TIPS

 

  1. Make an assessment of the project.
  2. Determine the steps needed to complete the project. The general rule is: The fewer steps there are, the easier it will be to complete. And, you will be finished in no time.
  3. Next, evaluate how difficult it will be to complete each step. Example: To paint a louvered door, you must (a) sand each piece of wood or metal as the case may be, (b) dust the surface, and (c) apply the paint using your chosen method. Here, the process of sanding can slow the paint process down quite a bit. It would be no big deal, if all you had to do was paint it.

 

So, how can you make a job easy, or develop a faster way of doing it? Let’s take the easy part of it first. You might want to follow the steps below.

 

  1. Answer this question: What is the largest size brush to use for painting this surface? A 1-inch brush is used for detail and glass framework. A 4-inch brush is used for flat, open wall areas and wide trim such as crown molding. Determine which one’s best suited for you and the job.

 

  1. When selecting a roller system: Relate the viscosity of the paint to the type of surface. Applying paint with a roller is easiest if the paint spreads smoothly, and you don’t have to dip the roller every five seconds. Example: Use a 3/8 inch roller cover when painting brick or concrete block. And, you will fight it the entire time.

 

  1. What can be easier than using a spray gun? Assess the surface and which spray tip is the most appropriate to apply the paint evenly. For those of you familiar with tip sizes, a 3-11 is best suited for trim painting and multiple small objects. It is possible to work yourself to death painting large wall spaces with a small tip. Recommendation: A 4-17 or 5-21 are the optimum choices here.

 

 Now: How can you paint this faster than, say, the last time? Think: Spray it!

 

A well-seasoned painter, with comprehensive knowledge in spray painting, will know intuitively how to get the most out of his spray work. Here are several things that he or she might bring to the attention of a less experienced painter.

 

  1. Completely strain the paint prior to siphoning or pressurizing. This step cannot be stressed enough.
  2. Make sure that all system filters are clean. Replace at regular intervals.
  3. Make sure the spray tip is not worn, and does not leak as you trigger the gun.
  4. Assess hourly use of each spray tip per manufacturer recommendations with type of paint.
  5. Thin paint or coating material to the proper viscosity NOTE: This will increase ease of paint flow and pumping efficiency.
  6. At all times, maintain a posture and spray gun motion which is perpendicular to the surface. 7. Cover everything within close proximity to the work that does not get painted. Use plastic sheeting, paper and drop cloths.
  7. Use a mask as necessary – one appropriate for the product, space, exposure, ventilation, etc.

 

How to Optimize Ease and Speed in Unison

 

Normally, I would consider it difficult to work fast and for the work to be easy at the same time. It takes some concentration to achieve what you’re looking for. There a few things you can do.

 

  1. Spray finish as much as possible before having to bring out the roller and brush. Your productivity will be considerably higher; and the hand tool use won’t have worn you out.

 

  1. Use a roller system in place of where you typically would have used a brush.

 

  1. Upgrade or vary the brush size from what you would normally use.

 

  1. Provide the highest level of surface preparation available.

 

To make a paint job easier, it is not necessary to cut corners or costs. Ease comes with experience: knowing how to complete a task using a sound and simple method versus getting too involved.

 

Start simple and build from there. Example: Don’t try to strip wood without using a chemical remover.

 

Fast means: You will be done sooner and generally make more money. Just don’t sacrifice quality and end up back where you started: behind schedule.

 

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I hope that you enjoyed your Thanksgiving holiday. Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob,”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Painting It: The Art of Using Paint and Varnish Remover

Removing paint from a surface can be done in several ways. Power tooling and abrasive cleaning are just two. Sand dry media blasting can be used to remove a large amount of paint effectively. But, it’s a rather involved process equipment-wise.

 

The removal of paint using a chemical method in that it lifts the paint from the surface in a far less labor intensive manner. Basically, you have to put up with the smell.

 

Below is a list of items you will need:

 

  1. Chemical stripper, paste or liquid. (I recommend Air Craft Stripper or Bix brand.)
  2. Lacquer thinner – for residue removal and as an aid to drying.
  3. Assorted brushes – stainless steel and nylon.
  4. Steel wool – # 1-3.
  5. Scotch pads – coarse.
  6. Rubber gloves -Neoprene.

 

The effectiveness of a remover depends on several things. They center on time, saturation of said surface, and type of film to be removed.

 

Below are some parameters to  go by:

 

  1. Determine basic film thickness or number of layers. In part, this will determine what type of remover to use: mild, medium, industrial strength or mastic barrier stripper. For qualified persons only.

 

  1. If you can, determine what type of material it is that you need to remove. This too will help you determine the remover type.

 

  1. Determine the surface’s level of saturation, test the material by using a small sample of stripper or nail polish remover. This will tell you how easily the material softens. Note: If, after applying the test, nothing bubbles or wrinkles, then the chances are that the material in question will require the strongest stripper you can find.

 

  1. As a general rule, when the remover test is applied, determine the time it takes for the surface material to alligator or wrinkle.

 

Rule of thumb: After applying remover:

 

  1. Surface wrinkles appear in 30 seconds or less: very easy to remove; use nylon brush.
  2. Surface wrinkles appear in 3 minutes or less: Scrape surface, reapply remover.
  3. Surface wrinkles appear in 5-10 minutes or longer: Use stronger stripper.

 

Methodology for using paint and varnish remover:

 

  1. Wear appropriate protective gear and clothing – eg. long pants, long sleeved shirt, gloves, and eye protection. I consider the eyes safety and gloves the priority.

 

  1. Work in well ventilated area. Set up fan to move fresh air in. If possible, work outside.

 

  1. Remove all hardware from object, as required: handles, knobs and so forth.

 

  1. Liberally apply stripper, covering surface with an even thickness.

 

  1. When paint or clear finish film starts to craze (slightly crack), the chemical is beginning to soften the underlying material. When surface has thoroughly wrinkled, use plastic or metal scrapper to remove top layers.

 

  1. If more material remains, apply additional remover. And wait the designated time for re-activation. When further wrinkling appears, scrape surface until there is little sight of the paint material.

 

  1. When you are refinishing stained wood, additional remover must be applied to draw out stain color.

 

  1. Once that is completed and the wood is dry, a bleach and or lacquer thinner can be used to remove more color and to dry the surface.

 

  1. After stripping application is completed, wash the surface completely with lacquer thinner. Let dry. Once dry, you can initiate the sanding process.

 

Using a paint stripper is a process which requires good judgment. The job is a whole lot easier if you can determine the rate at which the material is coming off.

 

Otherwise, like I have seen, a person can take all day trying to strip the varnish off of a door. They don’t know the proper signs to look for. Soon they become frustrated, even impatient, possibly upset.

 

FINAL TIP: Start with a small project or surface. Take your time. Work carefully. Respect both the characteristics of the surface, and the components of the remover. And, you’ll do fine.

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: Things That Can Go Wrong

Following directions, specifications, and recommendations is not a guarantee that you won’t have a problem on the job. The quality of a paint job depends on certain variables such as weather conditions, cleanliness of the surface, exposure to the sun, and amount of foot traffic.

 

Below I will describe two personal scenarios that illustrate exactly what I am talking about.

 

SCENARIO 1: The subject is a never-before painted panelized exterior wall surface made from a ceramic type substrate. The two-foot square tiles have a glazing which is highly polished.

 

Process for Scenario 1

 

1.Problem: Remove smooth glaze.

Solution: Sand surface by using orbital sander with #80 grit abrasive disc.

Result: Surface gloss is removed; good anchor pattern is produced.

 

2. Use recommended primer. Apply two-part epoxy type primer; thin accordingly with Methyl Ethyl Ketone; then spray finish using airless system.

 

3. Let material cure overnight.

 

4. On-site inspection revealed broad paint failure. Paint released from the surface; peeling on more than 80% of the total surface.

 

5. Manufacturer investigated claim. Checked for proper surface preparation and moisture content. Inspection determined that the cause of paint failure was due to primer being incompatible to substrate type. The use of an epoxy primer was refuted by the manufacturer. They said its recommended use was for bare metal surfaces only.

NOTE: The directions called for either that, or a chemically or abrasive etched surface.

 

6. Recommendation: Recondition surface; and apply an exterior alcohol based shellac type product. Finish with desired topcoat.

 

7. The surface withstood the new application; job well done.

 

 

SCENARIO 2:  The surface is a linear bare roof flashing made from aluminum.

 

Process for Scenario 2

 

1. Problem: Paint bare metal flashing.

Solution: Sand surface according to instruction, using #120 grit sandpaper.

Result: Created anchor pattern for paint to adhere to.

 

2.Use recommended oil based primer using brush and roller methods. Let cure overnight.

 

3. Following day inspection revealed total paint failure. One hundred percent of surface peeled and surface had an unexplained oily feel to it.

 

4. Manufacturer inspection ensued. The surface preparation and chosen product were approved. A moisture test was completed, with negative results. The metal was determined to be polished bare aluminum, not compatible with an oil based primer.

 

5. Recommendation: Recondition surface. Sand appropriately with #120 grit sandpaper. Treat with Muriatic acid wash; and rinse with water. When dry, apply thin coat of galvanizing metal primer by brush and roller. Finish with desired topcoat.

 

6. Finished product acceptable; it withstood the scratch test.

 

Adhesion problems to look out for: oily residue on surface, humidity over 72%, dust, alkaline or cracked surface, substrate incompatible with primer or finish material.

 

Methods for correcting adhesion problems: Sand surface with abrasive that corresponds to the surface’s smoothness. Wipe surface with de-glossing agent or high evaporating solvent. Use tack cloths to all but rough surfaces. Paint exterior surfaces on a dry day.

 

It is easy to overlook a step in preparing a surface. If you do that too often, you will be reminded of it when you are least likely to want it.

 

Give preparation the time it deserves. It will pay off in the final product. So will the customer.

 

Rule of thumb: When painting, keep a rag in one pocket and a piece of sandpaper in the other. Believe me, you will need them.

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Paintshop: Working with Toxic Painting Chemicals

Protecting oneself from chemical exposure is the key to enjoying a long working life. In the coatings industry this is particularly important since coatings and paint materials contain any number of harmful components. With what they are designed to do, they have to. Paints must withstand the weather, corrosion, rigorous abrasion, and the penetrating rays of the sun.

 

Paint manufacturers and the chemists do their parts in helping to ensure the lasting quality and endurance of paint.

 

The painter is the one who applies a coating for a specific situation. Therefore, he is the one subject to the conditions produced in applying the material.

 

This is to inform you that you are in charge of what and how you are exposed to.

 

Here’s an example: You are assigned to paint the ceiling deck of a retail store. You assess the situation and realize there is certain equipment you will need. Namely a spray pump, fluid line, a spray gun, and possibly plastic to cover what doesn’t get painted.

 

If you are a seasoned professional, then you also know you must protect yourself. You know this because you have prior experience with the product you are going to use. The paint is composed of various inorganic solids and evaporative solvents which are dangerous to one’s health. But, that’s what the job calls for.

 

Under most circumstances, most anyone would say, that doesn’t mean you can’t do it. Figure out how you can paint the ceiling without becoming seriously ill. This was a major problem in the early 1900’s when there was lead in the paint, and painters had virtually no breathing protection. Their life expectancy was often shorter.

 

Today, however, the toxicity of the various paint chemicals has met its match. If the painter “works smart”, there is no longer a reason for him to suffer.

 

This is what’s available to the painter and to everyone serious about their health:

 

  1. Self- Enclosed Breathing Apparatus. Similar to what firefighters and scuba divers use, it provides the optimum conditions for breathing in a toxic environment. It is composed of a compressed oxygen air tank and a facial mask or a complete helmet.

 

  1. An Inorganic Vapor Respirator. This is the painter’s most universal tool next to the brush and spray gun. It is a face mask design containing filter cartridges which remove substances in the air before you inhale. The cartridges become filled with contaminants and must be replaced regularly. Caution: When in an enclosed space, the solvent concentration can build up to a point where the cartridges cannot prevent the solvent vapor from coming through. If you know this before hand, opt for the Self-Enclosed breathing system.

 

  1. Air Flow Mask. This is a simple system in which air is supplied to a transparent type bag mask. The incoming air blows through the mask providing you with breathable air, as well as blowing through an opening the size of your mouth and eyes. This current of air keeps any dust and overspray from entering. It is not recommended for keeping out high evaporative solvent vapor.

 

  1. Full Body Suit. It is a thin cloth suit which can be used under many conditions. A mechanic could use one to keep the grease and oil off of him. For the painter, it prevents paint overspray, paint platter and a minimal amount of solvents from coming in contact with his skin. In this, it keeps the chemical from being absorbed out into the bloodstream. The body suit is very important to have on hand.

 

  1. Head Sock, Eye Protection and Gloves. These are accessory items that provide additional protection. They are one of the best precautions you can take, because they protect vital areas. Sometimes these items are taken for granted. You may take them off and forget to put them back on because you’re so busy. Big mistake!

 

I once was working on a wood striping project, when my gloves became dissolved up by the solvent. I kept on working without them.

 

Later, when I had finished, I saw that my hands were extremely dry. I then thought to myself, “I wonder how much of that solvent made it into my bloodstream and into my brain. I felt a little queasy and I was wearing a respirator. See what can happen?

 

Recommendations: Be your own advocate. It’s your health that will suffer if you aren’t.

 

* When first starting to work with a product, read the manufacturer’s label where it concerns

safety precautions.

*My own personal advice: Have a box or container in your vehicle in which to store only safety

equipment.

*Always keep a spare set of respirator cartridges. When you can’t find any, you’re likely to

keep working.

*Some products are against the law for use to consumers. This means they are even more toxic.

 

When working with paints, coatings, and solvents, toxicity is self evident. Prepare yourself so you will live to paint another day, and not one in which your family loses you.

 

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Toxic exposure is everyone’s business on the job.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painters at Work: In Hours, Days, Weeks, Months, Year

How much time do you spend using specific skills and abilities?

A group of 150 painters completed a detailed questionnaire to determine how painters work in the 21st century. It was part of a research project.

 
Section I: Computation of amount of time that we actually work.  

Example:

1. Day-to-week: 8 hours/day x 5 days = 40 hours/1 week

2. Weeks-to-month: 40 hours/1 week x 4 weeks = 160 hours/1 month

3. Months-to-year: 160 hours/1 month x 11 months = 1760 hours/11 months

4. ADD: 40 hours x 2 weeks = 80 hours/ ½ month

5. Approximate Total Hours = 1840 hours/ 11 ½ months (excludes 80 hrs./vacation time).

 

Section II: Computation of how we spend our time, based on following information:

 

1. Paint skills and abilities used alone;

2. Paint skills and abilities in combination/simultaneously;

3. Paint movements and positions used alone;

4. Paint movements and positions used in combination/simultaneously;

5. Paint tools and equipment used alone;

6. Paint tools and equipment used in combination/simultaneously.

 

COMPUTATIONS FOR TEN OF THE QUESTIONS.

 

Note: All painters checked the box beside:  “My figures/estimates are on the low side.”

 

1. How many hours do you hold a paint brush?

A. 6 hrs./day x 5 days = 30 hrs./1 week

B. 30 hrs/1 wk. x 4 wks. = 120 hrs./1 month

C. 120 hrs/1 mo. x 11 mos. = 1320 hrs./11 months

D. ADD: 30 hrs x 2 wks. = 60 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 1380 hrs./11 ½ months

 

2. How many hours do you use a spray gun?

A. 6.5 hrs./day x 5 days = 32.5 hrs./1 week

B. 32.5 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 130 hrs./1 month

C. 130 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 1430 hrs./11 months

D. ADD: 32.5 hrs./1 wk. x 2 wks. = 65 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 1495 hrs./11 ½ months

 

3. How many hours do you stand?

A. 7 hrs./day x 5 days = 35 hrs./1 week

B. 35 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 140 hrs./1 month

C. 140 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 1540 hrs./11 months

D. ADD: 35 hrs. x 2 wks. = 70 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 1610 hrs./11 ½ months.

 

4. How many hours do you carry?

A. 3 hrs./day x 5 days = 15 hrs./1 week

B. 15 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 60 hrs./1 month

C. 60 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 660 hrs./11 months

D. Add: 15 hrs. x 2 wks. = 30 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 690 hrs./ 11 ½ months

 

5. How many hours do you lift?*

A. 3 hrs./day x 5 days = 15 hrs./1 week

B. 15 hrs. wk. x 4 wks. = 60 hrs./1 month

C. 60 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 660 hrs./11 months

D. Add: 15 hrs. x 2 wks. = 30 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 690 hrs./ 11 ½ months

* Does not show the number of times painter lifts/carries combination of cans, buckets, tools, etc.

 

6. How many hours do you walk and/or step?

A. 5 hrs./day x 5 days = 25 hrs./1 week

B. 25 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 100 hrs./1 month

C. 100 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 1100 hrs./11 months

D. ADD: 25 hrs. x 2 wks. = 50 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 1150 hrs./ 11 ½ months

 

7. How many hours do you climb?

A. 5 hrs./day x 5 days = 25 hrs./1 week

B. 25 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 100 hrs./1 month

C. 100 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 1100 hrs./11 months

D. ADD: 25 hrs. x 2 wks. = 50 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 1150 hrs./ 11 ½ months

 

8. How many hours do you bend, kneel and/or crouch?

A. 3 hrs./day x 5 days = 15 hrs./1 week

B. 15 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 60 hrs./1 month

C. 60 hrs./1 mo. x 11 mos. = 660 hrs./ 11 months

D. ADD: 15 hrs. x 2 wks. = 30 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 690 hrs./ 11 ½ months

 

9. How much weight do you lift?  * Does not include weight of container

A. Paint (gal) = 122 fl. ounces/7.6 lbs.

B. Paint (qt.) =   31 fl. ounces/1.94 lbs.

C. Paint (5 gal) = 620 fl. ounces/38/.7 lbs.

D. Ladder (6 ft./wood) =

E. Ladder (6 ft./alum.) =

F. Ladder (12 ft. extension/alum) =

G. Tool kit = 15 lbs.
* Does not show number of times painter is lifting/carrying combination of product cans, tools, and equipment at same time.

Examples:

A. 2 gal paint = 15.2 lbs.

B. 1 gal paint (7.6 lbs.) + 1 ladder/6 ft. aluminum (23.8 lbs.) = 31.4 lbs.

C. 1-5 gal. paint (38.8 lbs.) + 1 ladder 12-ft aluminum (69 lbs.) = 107.8 lbs.

D. 1-5 gal. paint (38.8 lbs.) + 1 spray gun + system (23.5 lbs.) = 63.9 lbs.

E. 1-gal paint (7.6 lbs.) + 1 tool (15 lbs.) = 21.6 lbs.

 

10. How many hours do you match paint colors to painted surfaces?

A. 0.5 hrs./day x 5 days = 2.5 hrs./1 week

B. 2.5 hrs./1 wk. x 4 wks. = 10 hrs./1 month

C. 10 hrs./1 mo. x 11 months = 110 hrs./ 11 months

D. ADD: 2.5 hrs./1 wk. x 2 wks. = 5 hrs./ ½ month

E. Approximate total hours: 115 hrs./11 ½ months

 

Section II included the following questions that required painters to calculate their time:

 

11. How many hours do you prepare surfaces? Ex: A. Filling/caulking, B. Sanding, C. Patching, D. Priming

12. How many hours do you spend cleaning preparation and painting tools?

13. How many hours do you repair painting tools and equipment?

14. How many hours do you use a computer?

15. How many hours do you use a mobile communication device?

16. How many hours do you use a calculator, or other computation device/software program? 

 

Section III required the painters to identify the skills/abilities and tasks they used simultaneously. Example: Painting – use brush – carry, then stand on ladder – carry 1 gallon of paint.

 

Then, painters needed to compute how much time they performed/used/did each part within that combination.

 

How will this data be used? Why is it important? Here’s a capsule view:

 

1. Federal and state agencies can determine how actual job descriptions for specific occupations have changed.

2. Wage/pay scale experts can identify changes in calculating actual task-to-time rates.

3. Educational, vocational and technical program developers determine real-world/real-time curricular needs of current and future workers.

4. Recruitment and employment specialists identify how to market and fill positions, based on a three-to-five year worker retention scale.

5. Industry manufacturers of products, materials, supplies, tools, equipment, etc. can better identify the needs of the specific types persons that will be using their products.

6. Health industry providers determine newer problem areas in symptomology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis; also project industry needs in patient care.

 

This particular research  project is still being conducted. Is it the type of project in which the average painter should participate? ABSOLUTELY!

 

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Build up your own profession, craft or trade – especially for the next generation!

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting: Power’s Out!

BOOM! The major transformer blew. Off went all of the power. The bright lights, that I was working under, now dark.

 

The spray gun in my hand: nothing more than an idled device of steel and aluminum.

 

In the background, the steady hum of the gas-powered compressor, assuredly still on the job.

 

 

Without notice, popcorning out the 32-feet by 60-feet ceiling stopped cold. The custom designed effect: less than one-half of the application completed.

 

The “blackout” – totally out of my control – reminded me of an important on-the-job lesson.

 

Some things can’t be prevented by (me) the painter. They can’t be prepared for 100 percent either.

 

All you can do is:

 

  1. Shut down the compressor – if you haven’t done it already.
  2. Take a breather. Maybe take a seat on the drop-clothed floor.
  3. Glance around. What can you do while you wait for the power to come back on?

Example: “Do I need to get the spray gun into that bucket of water nearby?”

  1. Look around. What can you clean up and wipe up without access to power or lights?
  2. Find your meal pack. Grab an apple. Enjoy your lunch a little early.
  3. Go with the flow! Eventually, the power will be restored. And, things will get back to normal. (Well, close enough.)
  4. Personal Note: While I waited for the power to return, sitting outdoors in my Blazer was not an option. Temperature with the heat index and full sun exceeded 100 degrees.

 

SPECIAL TIPS: Does it look like your spray work is done for the day?

  1. Flush out and clean the spray hoses the best that you can. Lasso, tie securely, put in storage area provided. Or, on the truck.
  2. The same goes for your spray gun(s), and all other equipment and tools.
  3. Secure and straighten out the work area before you leave. Tightly close and safely store all containers of texturing, paint, thinners, and other products. Also all supplies.

 

And, there’s always tomorrow!

 

Have a great one: friends, e-mailers, likers, and secured followers.

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Everything of value can be put to good use. Rdh

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Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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