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Tips for Black Mold Fungi Infestation Remediation and Mitigation

Intro: Stachybotrys cartarum (atra) – Black mold – is a fungal myotoxin.

Situation: Heavy black mold fungi had produced severe infestation inside the modern, 3-bedroom manufactured home of a retired clinical psychologist and consultant from Ohio. Perhaps only three to five times a year she and her family used the small vacation property, located near a lake in south central Canada.

Question: “What can be done? How should the property be handled at this point?

Here are the suggestions that I gave to our relatives…

Initially, determine the home’s current market value as is, the extent and total cost of repairs needed to get home habitable, and the property’s “sellability” after all improvements.

Then, proceed with caution.

1. Stay out of the mold infested area/building – eg. manufactured home.

2. The spores are airborne, also transferable from fingers, hands, feet, etc.

3. The fungal spores pass to the skin, hair, eyes, ears, sinuses/nasal passages, lungs, etc.

4. Black mold remediation and mitigation must be handled by a certified specialist. The person(s) must be suited up head-to-toe, also equipped with a free-flowing, full-head breathing apparatus.

5. Furniture, fixtures, floor covering, cabinetry, etc. must be removed and disposed of, according to EPA standards, particularly if infestation is 50 percent or more, whether on a washable surface or not.

6. All substrates – walls, paneling, ceilings, flooring, joists, frames, plumbing, A/C units, ventilation ducts, etc. must be removed if they are infested 50 percent or more. In some areas – eg. children’s room, healthcare and rehabilitation facilities – and many situations, infestation of 30 percent requires major removals.

7. Before repairs and remodeling/ rebuilding can proceed safely, the entire area must be completely air dried – including behind and inside walls, ceilings, floors, built-ins, cabinetry, etc. RECOMMENDED: High-velocity industrial/commercial fan set up in each room or area.

8. All persons that will work on the structure – eg. manufactured home – must be notified/informed in advance, and in writing, of the property’s toxic Black mold history, conditions, environment, previous treatment(s), current infestation rating, etc.

9. Canada has EPA-type standards similar to the U.S. regarding handling of Stachybotrys cartarum myotoxins.

10. If any area has been 30 percent or more contaminated, allow at least forty-eight full hours after drying before reentry. CAUTION: Some remediation companies say 50 percent.

11. Make certain that the certified handlers test the environment for (a) airborne spores, (b) surface residue, (c) fumes, (d) air quality, and, (d) certain invisible oils that the myotoxins can produce.

12. EPA WARNING: Frequent exposure to high levels of Stachybotrys cartarum (atra) has been documented to cause moderate-to-severe permanent and irreversible medical conditions, impairments and disabilities: neurological; respiratory/lung; eye/ ear/mouth; skin; cardiovascular, endocrine, hepatic, psychological/behavioral, and, musculo-skeletal and balance.

13. Frequent exposure to high levels of Stachybotrys cartarum (atra) can cause fatalities.

14. These severe effects occur especially when a person is frequently exposed for prolonged periods of time – and in high temperature/heat and high humidity environmental conditions.

WARNING from American College of Neurologists, etc.

Frequent exposure to high levels of the fungal myotoxins for prolonged periods of time, along with exposure to concentrated toxic treatment chemicals such as chlorine bleach, have the strong potential to cause severe neurological damage such as short-term memory loss, cognitive and executive function deficits, even premature dementia. Prolonged exposure also affects blood vessels, arterial and vascular system; brain neurons/cells; and, ischemic brain/white matter (usually plural and concomitant).

Think long-term. How long do you intend to keep the property? Do you ever plan to sell it? Will anyone, who is already suffering from immuno-suppressive illnesses or deficits, ever use the place?

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Watch it! Painters that work in hot, humid climates – even on a short-term or temporary basis.
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Copyright July 28, 2018. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights resereved.

Painter’s World: Preventing Permanent Damage To Your Own Body

Every painter that’s worked in the trade for three months or longer knows about health and safety issues. Whether working for a hotel or facility, a contractor, a corporation, or on his or her own.

 

SEVEN CAREER PAINTERS AND THEIR HEALTH ISSUES…

 

LARRY herniated three lumbar discs from lifting, carrying and moving heavy paint equipment.

TIM fell and lost use of his thoracic and lumbar spine areas, both legs and one arm, after a scaffolding collapsed.

WAYNE damaged both hips climbing extension ladders and scaffolding, while carrying heavy paint cans and spray equipment.

PAUL destroyed the ligaments in his “painting hand” and wore down cartilage in his wrists from years of repetitive motions.

JESSE developed spondylosis in both knees from climbing ladders, bend, and crouching.

KEN wore down the joints, tendons and muscles in his “spraying hand.”

MARK developed skin cancer from frequent exposure to paint chemicals and direct sun.

 

Over time, over 78 percent of painters suffer permanent damage to their hands and wrists, spinal cord, knees, hips, and feet. And, they develop irreversible respiratory, lung, eye, and skin problems.

 

It’s all that lifting, toting, carrying, pushing, pulling, moving, bending, stooping, crawling, crouching, etc. It’s all that breathing in and coming in contact with toxic paint product chemicals, cleaning agents, environmental hazardous materials, etc.

 

Gross picture that I’ve painted? It’s meant to be. Alarming painters’ prognoses? It’s meant to be.

 

TEN TIPS TO PROTECT YOUR OWN HEALTH

 

Overall: Invest in and regularly use supports for the parts of your body that you use the most, and//or are already weak, damaged, or worn.

 

  1. Lifting – Besides that “bend and lift from the knees” rule, always wear a back brace from your thoracic spine to below the waist.
  2. Working on knees – Slide on knee pads, under or over your pants legs.
  3. Hand and wrist grasping – Slide foam tube over paint brush handles. (TIP from Mark Santos, Wall Wizard.)
  4. Carrying – Wear padded, firm grip gloves.
  5. Pushing/pulling – Wear elbow and forearm pads and braces.
  6. Spraying – Besides longer hand and wrist support gloves, wear a soft neck brace. I like one that fits under my shirt or jacket collar.
  7. Standing/climbing – Into those work boots, insert contoured gel pads. BONUS: Ankle/shin socks or supports.
  8. Stooping – Yes, affordable hip, thigh and femur supports are available – and work great.
  9. Breathing hazardous chemicals/fumes, etc. – Minimum: Inexpensive masks. Recommend: Adjustable respirators. Safest: Self-contained breathing/air flow apparatus.
  10. Skin and eyes – SUIT UP for skin. Wear snug-fitting safety glasses that cover entire area.

 

Eventually, you may become one of those painter’s statistics, regardless of what you do and precautions you take.

 

However, protecting and supporting your vital “painter parts” will certainly give you a one-up at minimizing those risks and maximizing your painter’s world shelf life.

 

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Protect your own body; it’s the only one that you’ll ever have!

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Stay safe. Live well. Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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