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Archive for the ‘Supplies’ Category

Paintshop: The Truth About Paint

“You get what you pay for” goes for paint and supplies as well.

 

For the painter, it is important to get the best value out of the products chosen. Painting materials must guarantee some degree of durability to retain their worth over time. You look for something else if they don’t.

 

What separates a quality paint product from one at the bottom of the barrel? One is a quality-formulated product; the other pretends to be one, particularly as they try to compete.

 

Typically, you can rely on a paint product which is a high-end brand name. And within that, the most expensive is normally the best. The reason is research and development.

 

When a company focuses on making a better, longer lasting product, the result should be a more durable product. At the same time, the manufacturers of all higher-end products do try to make improvements to even their lower-end, cheaper materials.

 

When it comes to paint, here’s what you should look for:

  1. amount of pigment.
  2. volume of solvent. CAUTION: Some paints have more water than they should.
  3. cost per gallon, versus the cost per five-gallon unit (not more than $15/$130.)
  4. paint is not manufactured by a foreign subsidiary of main brand.
  5. product has UV protection. TIP: If it doesn’t the surface may oxidize faster.
  6. binder percentages in paint are equivalent to similar priced and types of paint.
  7. viscosity test level information. TIP: My opinion: Paint is worthless if the material is too thin.
  8. Paint with primer” added is a misnomer. CAUTION: The chemistry of either cannot be combined to produce the same results as when the primer is applied by itself, then later the finish paint.

 

About Primers. A primer bonds to the surface. It provides a porous anchoring surface that the top coat to which it can bond effectively.

 

“Paint with primer” products skip one critical step. Be careful about this, especially if you’re an experienced painter. The time and money you think you are saving, along with the idea that your work has become easier, diminishes the actual quality of the job itself. You could be painting something twice in a year instead of once.

 

Now, who has the best Paint?

The two central choices are Glidden and Sherwin Williams. They have a long and valued reputation for making high quality, long lasting and moderately priced coatings. For the price, they are also the most diverse in their product types. Sherwin Williams, by far, has the best industrial line.

In its response to the residential market, the Behr paint line is exceptional, as well, although the pricing is somewhat higher than Glidden. For stains, Minwax and Olympic are without real competition. They also have a long history behind them. In the automotive industry, I would rate DuPont as the best option.

 

What are the most durable paints?

 

The three that I select the most are the following:

  1. Elastomeric compounds for exterior commercial masonry surfaces,
  2. Two-part Urethanes for automotive refinishing,
  3. Two-part Epoxy products for commercial/industrial corrosion and abrasion resistance.

 

Within reason and knowledge of these products, they may be purchased and applied by the general public.

 

A True On-Site Story…

 
I once painted a smoke stack with a silicon, heat resistant alkyd paint. The label said the product was resistant up to 600 degrees Farenheit.

After two days of curing, the smoke stack was put back into service. That same day the paint bubbled and peeled off, sending sheets of paint floating to the ground. It had been shown that the temperature of the metal heated to a consistent 625 degrees. Was it the paint product’s fault?
Several days later, I repainted the stack with another heat resistant product. This time it was a high-heat, aluminum fibered material. Once the stack became heated, everything turned out fine, no loose or peeling paint. In this case, I said it was the paint. Go figure.

 

Every experienced painter has a less than favorable on-site story to relate. Hopefully, yours had a positive ending, like mine did. Eventually.

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Best wishes from “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert  D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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Changes and Advancements in Hotel/Facility Painting, Part 3: Supplies, Tools and Equipment

Introduction

 
The standard types of painting tools and equipment will always be in use, as long as the paint products go unchanged in how they are applied. Paint spray equipment applications are not to be replaced. They are only approved upon by making subtle changes to spray guns and paint pumping systems.

When it relates to the roller cover, its design is continually being re-examined for ways to improve its performance, primarily with new materials. Widely used tools and equipment are difficult to replace. Changes in supplies mean costly changes to a system which is already operating efficiently.

 

  1. Changes and Advancements in Supplies:

A. Abrasives, caulking, patching compounds, masking materials, and other items. Changes: meet the demands of structural components and newer surfaces, also environmental changes.

B. Sanding products produced for wet or dry use. Option: Abrasives affixed to a sponge type substrate, allowing greater flexibility.

C. Caulking produced as waterborne and siliconized. Advantages: Resist cracking, and provide waterproofing, while allowing the surface to be painted.

D. Patching compounds that dry faster and harder. Advantages: sand easier, allow painting sooner.

E. Masking tapes designed to be left on the surface longer. Advantages: Do not pull the surface loose, and make re-taping unnecessary.

 

Comments about Supplies:

Commonly used supplies have advanced little. They tend to fulfill the need, in an efficient manner, for which they have been designed.

The quality of supplies must not be overlooked. They are your aid in producing a quality painting or finishing job. They sure can make it easier. By the way, a poorly adhering masking tape is not going to do you any favors.

 

  1. Changes and Advancements in Tools:

A. More paint brushes designed for applying multiple types of coating. Brush hairs are a composite of nylon, polyester, olefin, and other synthetic fibers.

B. Roller frames designed to reduce the friction of the roller covers. Added feature: control the covers from slipping off of the roller frames.

C. Roller covers, with new developments in nap composition. Advantages: Optimal nap composition which lasts longer, and is durable with various coatings.

D. Advancements that consider the ergonomics of a tool’s use. Example: Joint knife, which must be very strong and flexible. It must provide an excellent grip and balance for effective use.

 

Comments about Tools:

Advancements in tools are needed, especially when a product or material has no way of being applied. A tool must be designed, tested, fabricated, and marketed to industry, business and public consumers.

 

  1. Changes and Advancements in Equipment:

 A. Fine finishing, hand-held and airless portable spray system. Designed for ease of use by the professional painter and finisher. Homeowner/general consumer models: easier to operate, clean, and maintain.

B. Masking machines that are easy to manipulate in taping procedures. Normally for commercial, residential and automotive painting.

C. Spray pumps designed for easier use by the homeowner/general consumer market. Features: lighter weight, easy to set up, simple to clean up. Pressure fluid: maintained electronically.

 

Comments about Equipment:

Changes in equipment occur when use and testing point to an area of design which can be improved. I consider advancements, something which really alters the marketing of a piece of equipment.
What marks a more advanced piece of equipment? Some key features: greater performance, more energy efficient, more ergonomics, and increased durability.

 

Closing Comments about Painting Supplies, Tools and Equipment:

A successful painting project requires that all intended and needed supplies, tools and equipment are available, reliable and qualitative. Consistently, they must help the painter to (1) produce above-standard workmanship, (2) achieve satisfactory-plus results, and (3) ensure cost-effective durability.

 

PAINTER’S TIPS: Wisely choose each supply, tool and piece of equipment. Then, care and maintain each one properly. Maximize its potential usefulness and effectiveness on future projects, work orders and tasks. You’ll be glad that you did.

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Even the most advanced supply, tool, or piece of equipment is only as effective as the painter using it.

Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2014, 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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