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Archive for the ‘Exterior coatings’ Category

Paintshop: The Truth About Paint

“You get what you pay for” goes for paint and supplies as well.

 

For the painter, it is important to get the best value out of the products chosen. Painting materials must guarantee some degree of durability to retain their worth over time. You look for something else if they don’t.

 

What separates a quality paint product from one at the bottom of the barrel? One is a quality-formulated product; the other pretends to be one, particularly as they try to compete.

 

Typically, you can rely on a paint product which is a high-end brand name. And within that, the most expensive is normally the best. The reason is research and development.

 

When a company focuses on making a better, longer lasting product, the result should be a more durable product. At the same time, the manufacturers of all higher-end products do try to make improvements to even their lower-end, cheaper materials.

 

When it comes to paint, here’s what you should look for:

  1. amount of pigment.
  2. volume of solvent. CAUTION: Some paints have more water than they should.
  3. cost per gallon, versus the cost per five-gallon unit (not more than $15/$130.)
  4. paint is not manufactured by a foreign subsidiary of main brand.
  5. product has UV protection. TIP: If it doesn’t the surface may oxidize faster.
  6. binder percentages in paint are equivalent to similar priced and types of paint.
  7. viscosity test level information. TIP: My opinion: Paint is worthless if the material is too thin.
  8. Paint with primer” added is a misnomer. CAUTION: The chemistry of either cannot be combined to produce the same results as when the primer is applied by itself, then later the finish paint.

 

About Primers. A primer bonds to the surface. It provides a porous anchoring surface that the top coat to which it can bond effectively.

 

“Paint with primer” products skip one critical step. Be careful about this, especially if you’re an experienced painter. The time and money you think you are saving, along with the idea that your work has become easier, diminishes the actual quality of the job itself. You could be painting something twice in a year instead of once.

 

Now, who has the best Paint?

The two central choices are Glidden and Sherwin Williams. They have a long and valued reputation for making high quality, long lasting and moderately priced coatings. For the price, they are also the most diverse in their product types. Sherwin Williams, by far, has the best industrial line.

In its response to the residential market, the Behr paint line is exceptional, as well, although the pricing is somewhat higher than Glidden. For stains, Minwax and Olympic are without real competition. They also have a long history behind them. In the automotive industry, I would rate DuPont as the best option.

 

What are the most durable paints?

 

The three that I select the most are the following:

  1. Elastomeric compounds for exterior commercial masonry surfaces,
  2. Two-part Urethanes for automotive refinishing,
  3. Two-part Epoxy products for commercial/industrial corrosion and abrasion resistance.

 

Within reason and knowledge of these products, they may be purchased and applied by the general public.

 

A True On-Site Story…

 
I once painted a smoke stack with a silicon, heat resistant alkyd paint. The label said the product was resistant up to 600 degrees Farenheit.

After two days of curing, the smoke stack was put back into service. That same day the paint bubbled and peeled off, sending sheets of paint floating to the ground. It had been shown that the temperature of the metal heated to a consistent 625 degrees. Was it the paint product’s fault?
Several days later, I repainted the stack with another heat resistant product. This time it was a high-heat, aluminum fibered material. Once the stack became heated, everything turned out fine, no loose or peeling paint. In this case, I said it was the paint. Go figure.

 

Every experienced painter has a less than favorable on-site story to relate. Hopefully, yours had a positive ending, like mine did. Eventually.

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Best wishes from “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert  D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s World: Painting Unusual Projects

What are the most unusual paint projects that you’ve ever done?

 

10 Unusual Paint Projects Worked on By Other Painters

 

  1. Exterior and interior of Doberman’s custom dog house
  2. Tennis equipment storage of retired athlete
  3. Children’s-sized 3-room playhouse
  4. Garage interior room for small antique tool collection
  5. Miniature apartment interior for training city dogs “how to live in an apartment”
  6. Built-in notions and supplies closets for professional designer and seamstress
  7. Huge storage closet for tech geek
  8. Children’s 2-level treehouse
  9. Agri-seed museum
  10. School’s double flagpole and connecting platform

 

10 Unusual Paint Projects that I have Worked On

 

  1. Sandblasting and spraying vinyl coating on structural steel frame for train scale
  2. Painted geometric graphics in fluorescent colors in day care center
  3. Applied genuine grasscloth wallcovering to entire room – ceiling, walls, doors
  4. Painted piping and talk system that was being shipped to China
  5. Sandblasted and painted semi-tractor wrecker
  6. Stained woodwork for molded panel ceiling
  7. Painted church dome with Metallic Gold
  8. Sandblasted and epoxy-painted Olympic-sized swimming pool
  9. Applied foil wallpaper to large ceiling
  10. Brush and rolled steel tub frames for Wild West display

 

Probably, my father’s most unusual painting project was the interior of an underground bomb shelter. In particular, he painted the vertical wood panels inserted into the walls of the pre-cast 12-feet by 18 feet vault thick steel shell. The agri-businessman’s wife refused to even step in the security structure unless it “looked inviting and homey.”

 

Unusual painting projects tend to stretch our creativity, agility and patience. They also give us the opportunity to have lots of fun. To use colors in exciting, unexpected ways. To reach into our greater selves as craftspersons and artisans.

 

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Unusual painting projects can open the door to new, specialty career opportunities.

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Thank you for including “Painting with Bob” in your busy day.

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: How to Achieve a Superior High Gloss Finish

First of all, starting out with a smooth surface is essential. With a rough surface, you will have to add exceedingly more hours of labor to even reach a starting point.

 

Metal, fiberglass or hardwoods are the substrates of choice when considering an ultra smooth surface.

 

In this instance, I will use metal as the example. No matter what the situation, the proper procedure in achieving a gloss finish includes:

 

  1. Initial metal preparation – Acid etch surface, orbital sand with #80 grit sandpaper.

 

  1. Dry and wipe surface clean with lacquer thinner, then use tack cloth.

 

  1. Using an HVLP spray system, apply multiple thin coats of high solids epoxy primer or acrylic lacquer. Let dry thoroughly. Orbital sand between coats with #400 sandpaper; then, wet sand with #600 sandpaper.

 

  1. Apply urethane sealer using two thin coats. When dry, wet sand using #600 sandpaper.

 

  1. Apply urethane basecoat using three thin coats with a 60% overlap in spray pattern.

 

  1. After two to four hours of drying, color sand using #600, then, #800 sandpaper. Wash surface with soap and water. Rinse with warm water, and let dry.

 

  1. Reapply urethane basecoat using three thin coats.

 

  1. After drying time, wet sand with #800 grit sandpaper. Wash and rinse surface. Dry and tack cloth.

 

  1. Apply multiple thin coats of urethane clear coat. Let dry.

 

  1. Wet sand with #1000 or #1200 grit sandpaper. Rinse with warm water. Let dry.

 

  1. Apply final clear coat. Let dry.

 

After all that time and preparation, you should be able to see your face in all that shine. What is paramount in order to reach such a high level of finish is a person’s skill at spray painting. No beginner can ever hope to achieve such a finish.

 

Typically, there are five elements involved which you must have:

 

  1. A well seasoned professional with comprehensive knowledge of all the modern finishes.
  2. A well equipped spray booth with positive flow ventilation.
  3. A client who is willing to pay for the best, and has patience.
  4. A preparation team who is dedicated to producing the finest finish imaginable.
  5. All those involved should have a basic knowledge of OEM and aftermarket paint material and solvent compatabilities.

 

Producing a fine finish at a hotel, on a client site, or in your home can be accomplished. You do not have to follow all of the rules above. Just keep the following ideas in mind:

 

First, wet sand or dry sand in decreasing grits #220-#320-#400.

Next, make sure that, after sanding, the surface is tack clothed. If you do not, you will have debris in the finished paint job.

Third, always apply thin multiple coats. With heavy coats, you may have runs, sags, and cracking. You absolutely want to avoid this.

Final step, set up a spray booth.

 

Also, provide adequate ventilation by (a) using fans, and (b) wet the floor to keep dust at a minimum.

 

And, if you are interested in wood finishing, some of the same methods can be used. Just keep the surface dry and dust free until completed.

 

A superior finish is all about knowledge and talent. It is about looking at such a finish and wondering, “Who could have done this? It’s magnificent!”

 

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A superior high gloss finish starts with a super skilled finisher.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting Patterns: Giant Chessboard – Part II

In “Painting Patterns: Giant Chessboard – Part I,” posted February 10, 2o16, we covered a giant chessboard project that turned into a huge mess.

 

Here, we cover how the unique project – exterior driveway and courtyard, and interior main hallway, of a retired Chess champion’s large residence — was re-done. Beautifully! And right!

 

HOW THE PROJECT GOT STRAIGHTENED OUT

 

** A new paint crew came on board, and started from step one. **

 

 

PREP WORK OF ALL SURFACES

 

1. Lightly sanded driveway, courtyard and hallway.

2. Re-measured all three areas; then re-gridded surfaces, locating axis and connection points.

 

EXTERIOR AREAS – Driveway and Courtyard

 

1. Sprayed S-W 30 Seconds Outdoor Painter’s Prep Cleaner (124-7485) onto both surfaces.

2. Hosed off both areas. Let dry completely (4 hours).

3.  Sprayed H&C Concrete Etch Solution onto driveway and courtyard areas.

4. Plumb-lined, then taped grid lines and block edges. Tape: ScotchBlue 2097; 2090.

5. Labeled Autumn Brown and Natural Tan blocks, on grid. Used color-coded tapes.

6. Cut in, then painted Tan blocks on driveway. H&C Concrete Solid Color Stain/Sealer, S-B.

— Two, 2-men teams worked from center of each row outward, in opposite direction.

— First man on team cut in, then second filled in blocks. Rollers: 3/8 in. nap by 3 in., and 9 in.

7. Cut in, then painted Autumn Brown blocks. Followed technique used in No. 5.

8. Rolled first coat of H&C Concrete Sealer Wet Look on driveway. Rollers: ¼ in. nap x 12 inch.

9. Cut in, then painted courtyard chessboard: Natural Tan blocks, then Autumn Brown.

10. Rolled on first coat H&C Concrete Sealer Wet Look onto courtyard. Roller: ¼ in. nap x 12 in.

— Let surface dry for 24 hours.

11. Rolled on second coat of H&C Wet Look. SharkGrip Slip Resistant Additive mixed in paint.

12. Sprayed one coat of H&C Concrete & Driveway Protector onto both surfaces.

 

INTERIOR AREA – Floor/Main Hallway

 

1. Covered hallway walls with 4-mil plastic sheeting; ceiling with 6-mil.

— Used special masking tape; walls papered in Grass Cloth.

2. Smooth-sanded wood floor, using graduated grit disks, 400-to-1000, on orbital sander.

— Thoroughly vacuumed after each grit sanding.

3. Primed with S-W Multi-purpose (wood)*. Roller: ¼ in. nap x 12 in. roller. * Primer optional.

4. Plumb-lined, then taped grid lines and block edges. Used T-square to “square” all corners.

Tape: ScotchBlue 2090/Orig. Multi-use; 2080EL/Advanced Delicate.

5. Labeled Meadow Brown and Naturel Tan blocks, from axis out. Used color-coded tape.

6. Cut in, then painted Tan blocks, front doorway to back entry.

Paint: S&W Porch and Floor Enamel. Brushes: 1 ½ in./angled; Rollers: 3/8 in. nap x 9 in.

7. Cut in, then painted Meadow Brown blocks. Brushes, rollers: Same as for Tan blocks

8. Let area dry for 24 hours.

9. Gently “glass-sanded” floor; carefully vacuumed immediately.

10. “Fan-sprayed” on Sherwin-Williams MinWax Polyurethane, semi-gloss clear.

NOTE: Everyone on the team closely followed paint manufacturers’ instructions for each product.

 

WHO DID RE-DO PROJECT

 

1. 5 Journey-level painters, including foreman;* also 1 apprentice.

— 5 experienced in application of specialty exterior products.

— 1 also highly skilled decorative painter/finisher – interior work.

* Note: Journey foreman also served as project manager, with over 21 years of experience.

 

HOW LONG RE-DO PROJECT TOOK

 

1. Prep work: 3 days.

2. Painting: 8 days.

3. Clean-up: 1 full day.

* Note: Time did not include “rained out” days. (There were four.)

 

WHAT PAINT PRODUCTS WERE USED – A Summary

 

* Exterior surfaces: Sherwin-Williams 30 Seconds Outdoor Painter’s prep Cleaner; S-W H&C Concrete Etch Solution; S-W H&C Concrete Solid Color Stain/Sealer, solvent-based; S-W H&C Concrete Sealer Wet Look (topcoat); S-W H&C SharpGrip Slip-Resistant Additive; S-W H&C Concrete & Driveway Protector.

* Interior surface: S-W Multi-Purpose (wood) Primer; S-W Porch and Floor Enamel, satin: Meadow Trail (Brown), Naturel Tan; S-W MinWax Polyurethane Super Fast Dry, semi-gloss.

 

WHAT PROJECT COST – Approximate

 

1. Original estimate:   Paint: $5,200 Labor: $ 2,400 Total: $7,600

2. Rescue/Re-Do cost: Paint Products: $15,043.83 Labor: $10,060 Total: 25,103.83*

* Does not include cost for tools and supplies.

3. ** Owner cost: Paint: $0.00; Supplies: $0.00; Labor: $0.00; Legal fees: $4,000. Total: $4,000

** Final figures, after settlement.

 

See upcoming post: “Chessboard Project Supplies Chart and Computations.”

 

WHO PAID FOR PROJECT RE-DO

 

Final decision: “Split responsibility.” Real estate company that “subcontracted” job to painting contractor, that employed first two painters. * Original paint crew’s work was not guaranteed.

 

HOW DIFFICULT “CHESSBOARD” WAS TO STRAIGHTEN OUT

 

“It could have been worse,” said the paint foreman/project manager, a retired IUPAT member from N.W. Indiana. He’d moved to Florida in 1995 to get the opportunity to work on “extreme, detail projects.” I have to say: That guy was really in his element. And, an amazing craftsman!

 

How I was involved in project

 

Found paint foreman/project manager, helped identify crew members; helped with product selection, surface testing, and estimating; advised about layout, gridding, and procedures. (My services were gratis. A family friend of property owner.)

 

See upcoming post: “Chessboard Project Supplies Chart and Computations.”

 

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Complicated jobs are nothing more than simple jobs with more steps.

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Have a safe and satisfying day, everyone. And, many thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting Patterns: Giant Chessboard – Part I

 

Last October, two painters took on a project that they had no business tackling. One, they had less than one year experience in the trade. Two, they were production painters. And, three, they were not detail-oriented.

 

Project: Paint continuous pattern on exterior driveway and courtyard, and interior main hallway.

Dimensions: Driveway: 36 feet wide by 350 feet long; Courtyard: 18 feet wide by 24 feet long. Hallway: 12 feet wide by 220 feet long

 

Pattern/effect: Wood-grain chessboard.

 

Property owner: Amateur chess champion and business entrepreneur.

 

WHAT THE PROJECT REQUIRED

 

  1. Precision measuring: up, down, across.
  2. Precision gridding: linear, horizontal, vertical.
  3. Precision marking: block pattern, no-borders, edge run-offs.
  4. Labeling: Alternating blocks, horizontal and vertical.
  5. Precision cutting in, each paint block.
  6. Prompt, steady fill-in of each block, in gridded order.
  7. Careful matching of correct paint color to correct block.
  8. Frequent paint mixing and stirring: 5-gallon containers; also 1-gallon roller pan filler cans.

 

HOW THE PROJECT GOT MESSED UP

 

  1. Measuring: each surface area’s length and width estimated, not measured; courtyard missed.
  2. Gridding: each area’s axis (center) not located.
  3. Marking: perpendicular lines forming block edges/encasements not marked evenly. Corners not squared. Why: Product failure: Poor quality masking tape failed.
  4. Labeling: Cabernet brown and Sandstone blocks not alternated in certain area. Why: Worker(s) did not pay attention, lost track, got in a hurry.
  5. Cutting in: corners not sharp – not squared/ “L-ed” off. Fuzzy edging. Why: Work speed did not match skill level; wrong brushes used; too much paint on brushes; poor taping. (See C.)
  6. Filling-in: Finish paint surface not smooth. Paint applied unevenly, also too thinly or thickly in spots. Unblended brush stroke edges. Paint-clogged brushes.
  7. Paint-to-block matching: Lost chessboard pattern big time. Note: One block color off messes up entire sequence.
  8. Frequent mixing/stirring to avoid “bumps,” lumps and separation in applied paint. Why: Paint products not strained or filtered before being poured into 1-gallon buckets, paint tray.

 

See: Painting Patterns: Giant Chessboard – Part II.

 

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Champion chess players and devoted decorative painters share a key skill: Patience.

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Estate Properties: Repainting and Redecorating within the Sale Prep Budget

A loved one passes away, and is laid to rest. His or her estate must be settled in a legally acceptable and timely order. The residence – eg. house, townhouse, condo – is a major part of that estate. And, it must be sold.

 

Often, each heir will have a wish list for using his or her share of the monetary proceeds. Each heir expects to get at least a certain amount.

 

The final sale price must be maximized. The property needs to undergo a facelift, before it goes on the market.

 

A Skilled Painter and Decorator’s role

 

A painter, skilled in renovation and restoration – especially of estate properties – can hold the key to realizing a lucrative sale.

 

  1. The painter will be able to accentuate the home’s attributes and advantages.
  2. The painter will be able to upgrade the home’s features to appeal to today’s real estate market.
  3. The painter will be able to camouflage or minimize its flaws – uneven walls, cracked wood.
  4. The painter will be able to suggest or advise the seller(s) about other work to have done, and by whom.

 

The painter can help the estate trustee or administrator work up a total facelift estimate.

Also, the painter/decorator can help determine an itemized budget range for each service that needs to be completed. Prior to listing the property for sale.

 

Painting/decorating tips gleaned from giving an interior facelift to a home prior to listing.

 

Keep the facelift simple. Make it suitable to the home’s architecture, style, worth, and location.

 

  1. TIP: To minimize the pale yellow cast of once white ceilings, custom tint white latex wall a very light yellow-white. This stretches facelift budget that cannot cover repainting of ceilings.

 

  1. TIP: Paint all walls throughout the home the same custom-tinted paint mentioned above. This creates flowing, uniform look.

 

  1. TIP: Repaint the bathrooms in their same original color – in this case soft yellow. This helps contain paint product costs.

 

  1. TIP: Limit repainting in kitchens, breakfast nooks, etc. that often feature tiled wall areas.

 

  1. TIP: Select high-end paint products, known (a) offer better coverage and (b) require only one coat. Especially in older homes, and in certain climates.

 

  1. TIP: Give ample attention to cleaning and prepping all surfaces to be re-finished. Examples: patching, filling, caulking, sanding. Allot enough drying time between steps and applications. Remember: The quality of a finishing job is linked directly to the quality of the surface prepping.

 

  1. TIP: Limit priming to surfaces that really need it. Hint: Areas that will likely stay the same finish color for at least the first year of new ownership.

 

  1. TIP: Apply finish coat to walls, trim, doors, etc. room-by-room. Or, whichever way that will assure ample drying time, a uniform finish throughout, and save in overall labor costs.

 

 

Before you call in a painter. . .

 

Empty the home’s interior to the walls. Here are a few tips to help you.

 

  1. Distribute and remove all personal items. (Follow the terms of the trust and/or will.) This includes all types of items such as furniture, accessories, appliances; china, silver, housewares, cookware; clothing, jewelry; linens, textiles; antiques, collectibles, books, etc.

 

  1. Remove and place remaining valuables in the hands of the best available dealers. Examples: expensive jewelry, art; antiques, collectibles, glass, books.

 

  1. If there’s time, hold a “class act” yard sale for the rest of personal property. Roll out the red carpet bargain-prices. Offer boxed/bagged/packaged group deals. Offer some quality items for free.

 

  1. GOOD NEIGHBOR TIP: If your loved one lived in the neighborhood for years: Invite close neighbors to come and select a few items to keep. No charge.

 

  1. Donate some of the nicer clothing, accessories, linens, etc. to a local church-run thrift shop.

 

  1. Donate whatever is left to the nearest Goodwill Industries, Salvation Army, or similar charity store. Call in advance to make certain they offer pick-up service.

 

Giving a home its final touches of paint and finish – facelift – before its estate sale can be rewarding.

In a way, the painter gets the opportunity to help the family give their loved one’s property a proper send off. And, that may help those left behind find some sense of closure.

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When people know how much you care about them, they care about how much you know.

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Special thanks to supporters through LinkedIn.com and Google+.  See you on the IN-side.

And, thanks, everyone, for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Painting with Marley – and One Curious 3-Year Old

A surprise visit from a property owner’s pet iguana reminded me of an old iguana friend.

 

“Marley” and I met in June of 2007. On the walkway between Engineering Department’s doors and the back of the building.

 

He measured at least four feet in length. weighing over ten pounds. And, he blocked my path. Refusing to budge.

 

I stood and stared. Captivated by this amazing, and beautiful, creature.

 

His scales glistened in the bright sun. Showing off a kaleidoscope of hues in green, blue, red, and orange. He had a “third – parietal – eye” on the top of his head. A tall-to-short row of spines – “dewlap” – that ran down his back to the tail. Behind his neck, I saw these small, “spoke” like scales. And, then there was a very large round scale on each cheek.

 

It was my first very close encounter with a Green iguana. Considered a 21st century descendent of the prehistoric Polychrotid lizard.

 

Getting back to Marley. The name I gave him in late 2007, after crossing his path at least weekly.

 

One morning, our meeting was not exactly friendly. I’d needed to leave a freshly-coated exterior corridor, on the second story to help my boss move something very heavy.

 

Upon returning, I found claw marks in the damp, unset paint. And, Marley lying, leisurely, at the top of the steps that I’d rolled out less than a half-hour earlier.

 

The frustrating point came next. No matter what I did, the iguana would not move. Even when three young guests, in swim trunks, appeared at the foot of the steps.

 

My first instinct: Protect the three boys. Position myself between them and the iguana. That worked fine with the two older children.

 

The youngest, however, ignored me – and the WET PAINT signs. He ran onto the wet surface. Toward the iguana.

 

“AN’MAL! AN’MAL!” he shouted happily. “AN’MAL! Come here.”

 

Well, the “an’mal” raised on all fours. He swished that tail a couple of times. Then, he jumped from the second story landing, to the ground beneath. Scurrying toward the nearest clump of dense bushes.

 

The youngest boy following closely behind. “AN’MAL! AN…..’MAL!”

 

His big brothers chased after him. “NO, DAVID.” “Stop, Davie.”

 

I took off running after all three boys. My greatest concern was for their safety. The second concern: Marley.

 

Suddenly, alongside me appeared this lady in a dripping wet swimsuit. The boys’ mother.

 

In a flash, she had all three sons corralled, and following her back to the gazebo in the pool area.

 

Lucky for me, the iguana’s claw marks in the paint were easy to lightly smooth out with a No. 2 steel wool pad.

 

The first thing next morning, I re-coated that section of the concrete corridor. Guarding the area for fifteen minutes longer than necessary. Until the special coating had dried completely.

 

Moral of the story: Watch out for four-legged creatures and two-legged boys when painting open, and public, spaces.

 

Footnote: The last time I saw Marley was the afternoon of April 19, 2013. He stood on the hotel’s side of the fence. He peered toward the nearby, swampy pond. And, “Charlie,” a resident Alligator, floating along like an old log. Only the top of his snout and beady eyes above water.

 

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Lucky is the painter that can work in the midst of nature.

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Here’s hoping that you have a great month, everyone. Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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