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Archive for the ‘Paint Methods: Property/Structures’ Category

Paintshop: Equipping Engineering Techs with Right Paint Colors

My biggest staff painter challenge was ensuring that the other engineering techs to use the correct paint products for handling “painter” work orders on my days off. Mainly touching up surfaces in guest rooms and visible public areas.

 

They had neither the “eye” nor the time to match paint products in the shop to the paint colors of smaller areas needing repainting.

 

Yes, it was easy for them to find all of the cans of yellow latex paint, for instance. A paint chip was displayed on the lid of each container. And, it was easy to identify which cans of yellow paint had been used in the guest room originally in Building Two.

 

However, it was difficult to select the exact matching tint of yellow latex needed to touch up a particular spot or wall in a particular room. One reason: Over time, the original paint color on the wall would have faded or discolored. Why: Due to sun exposure, repeated household chemical cleanings and/or surface damage.

 

In most instances, after returning from days off, I’d quietly re-touch up the “touch-ups.” No big deal was made about the error in paint color selection. Nothing was said about the added time that it took to back pedal, and redo painting work orders. And, I’d never say a word to the tech about the chief engineer’s or general manager’s related complaints.

 

Painters, here’s one method to simplify the paint color selection job for your techy teammates.

 

  1. Go through all of the paint cans in the shop.
  2. Create a chart showing a chip for every paint can you have.
  3. Take the paint chip chart along as you make your daily rounds – eg. guest rooms, public areas, activity rooms, offices.
  4. Match each chip to the surface/area that it matches, and notate information.
  5. Back in the shop, add surface, area/wall and room information to every paint can label in the place. Write date that you matched the paint chip to surface.
  6. Group and shelve the paint cans according to building and room/area.
  7. Put up a small “poster” to identify those products by area.
  8. Make up a quick-reference wall chart for your engineering teammates.
  9. Give each guy a little one-on-one tour of the paint can setup. Show how to use the set up to their advantage.

 

NOTE: My engineering teammates made it clear that they did not like the hassle they got from the bosses, hotel management and guests  about the use of the wrong paint products and/or colors.

 

FOOTNOTE: You are bound to run into this type of problem. It really can’t be prevented totally.

 

BEST PIECE OF ADVICE: Do your best to keep the paint products in the paintshop organized and easy to access. Also, go easy on your teammates. They’re just trying to cover for you when you’re unable to be there.

 

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Train your engineering teammates in the paint touch-up methods that work for everyone.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s View: Maintenance Tech and Nurse Follow New Hospital Procedure

A local hospital has a new procedure for each floor nurse. Every hour, she or he must check on every patient under his or her care. Then, the nurse writes his or her initials in the appropriate “hour” space on a sheet of paper taped on the wall in each respective patient’s room.

 

Here’s what a relative observed…

 

  1. The nurse on each shift did enter the room and did initial the appropriate sheet(s) of paper.
  2. Some nurses at least glanced back in the direction of the patient’s bed before initialing the sheet of paper.
  3. Those same nurses were likely to actually speak to the patient during at least 50 percent of those quick log-in visits.
  4. The same shift nurses were likely to return promptly to the room and check on the patient’s welfare.
  5. The same shift nurses tended to extend patient care in empathetic, cheerful and thorough ways.

 

During the night, a hospital maintenance tech entered the room at the same time as a male nurse. Quietly, they chit-chatted while doing their respective jobs.

 

The maintenance tech checked on the operation and controls of the HVAC system. The nurse checked on the patient’s comfort level, bed, wall lighting fixture, etc.

 

Both men completed their tasks about the same time. They arranged to meet or coffee at break time.

 

Nurse Louis wrote his initials onto both sheets, taped onto the wall. Maintenance tech Juan pulled out a mobile device. He pushed a few buttons on the keyboard. Then he returned the phone to his pocket.

 

It turned out that Juan had a new procedure to follow, too. Each time that he left a work area, he had to log it into the engineering department’s daily data base.

 

Also, both men were originally from Puerto Rico. And, both were working at jobs they loved.

 

When I picked up the relative after dismissal one evening, Louis removed the I.V. and disconnected the mobile monitor. With great pride, he told me about the maintenance tech, Juan.

 

“Juan is the smartest, most honest man I know. And, the hardest worker. The best maintenance tech in America. Well, in Florida. He’s as good at his job as anyone with a big education and degrees. Like me.”

 

In those few words, Nurse Louis said a lot about himself, too. And, he revealed why he was among the few shift nurses that actually looked back and checked on his patient each time that he came along to initial each daily log on the wall.

 

Kudos to Maintenance Tech Juan and Nurse Louis.

 

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A man of merit on the job is a man of worth in any community.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Upcoming Blog Topics for 2016

Hello, Everyone,

Looking forward to a new year full of opportunities – and challenges (of course)?
How about checking in here, when schedule permits? And picking up tips to help your painting job easier?

 

10 Upcoming Topics…

 

1. Building a Spray Booth: Affordable Options.

A. The Portable

B. The Recyclable Space

 

2. Hotel Painting Tips for Engineering/Maintenance Techs: An Update.

 

3. Spraying Dos, Don’ts, and Maybes.

 

4. Painting Methods: Adapting for Ability Changes.

 

5. Painting Methods: Adapting for Environmental Changes and Challenges.

 

6. Painting Methods: Adapting for Property/Structural Changes.

 

7. Painting Methods: Adapting for Company Policy Changes.

 

8. Our Brain’s Memory: The Basics.

 

9. Memories Are Made of This: Four Main Types.

 

10. Our Brain’s Memory: At Our Workplace.

 

Painting and decorating offers a full spectrum of creative opportunities. Even in pursuing the most mundane tasks. And, embarking on the most exciting new projects. Enjoy them all!

 

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

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