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Paintshop: Managing Minor Frustrations and Snags

We’ve all had them. Those annoying, little glitches in our regular schedules that can mess up everything.

 

Take the new compressor hose that kinks, and causes the paint spray to sputter and spurt out of the nozzle. Or the day-late shipment of a big order of industrial coating for pipes. Or when you’re short two crew members, because they called in sick on the same day. Or the blown tire on the equipment-loaded truck out on the freeway.

 

What do you do? How do you deal with this minor stuff, so that you can move on to the real jobs?

 

Speedy Solutions for Minor Snags

 

1. Kinking compressor hose

 

Cut the hose where kinked area exists. Fit a hose connector – brass or galvanized pipe, as available. Then clasp each side of the connection with the proper size of stainless steel pipe clamp. This will hold well, until you are able to change out a new hose.

 

2. Delayed shipment of paint

A. Put out an emergency call to the manufacturer’s rep for a small supply of product. Enough to get at least one day of spraying completed.

B. Call the manager of the paint manufacturer’s closest paint store. Explain the situation. Have them get on the horn and get some of the shipment to you pronto.

 

3. Manpower shortage on a rush job

A. Call your company superintendent. Ask him to switch two guys to your job site for two days – whatever length of time you need the extra help.

B. Shorthanded anyway? Call for two men through the local painter’s union.

C. Non-union shop? Call the nearest construction trades’ labor pool.

D. Switch tasks on the schedule, if possible.

 

4. Big flat tire on loaded equipment truck

A. Call the shop for someone to bring out a replacement tire. TIP: Before you call, make sure that you have the jack system on the truck.

B. Call the shop for someone to bring out another truck, and then help you transfer the load. TIPS: Don’t think about transferring equipment that requires more men than you have around. And, never try to transfer equipment that requires OTHER equipment to move, lift, and/or lower it.

C. Call a truck towing service.

D. Call a truck rental outfit for emergency delivery.

 

5. Running out of paint thinner on a remote industrial job site.

A. Call your shop foreman. Have someone grab a supply, and deliver it to you.

B. Call the nearest paint store for an emergency delivery.

C. Call the closest Home Depot, Lowes, etc. – wherever your company has an account. Purchase a day’s supply of thinner over the phone. If possible, send a worker to pick it up.

D. Hand some cash to your site crew’s “go-for” person – apprentice. And, send him or her to the nearest hardware store. TIP: Price will be higher than a trade-construction source.

 

NOTE: Once, we called the business agent at the union hall, and asked him to pick up eight gallons of thinner from the nearest Sherwin-Williams, on the way for his scheduled visit to our site. Our company president ordered the supply. S-W had the containers waiting at their back door.

 

6. Two spray guns malfunction at the same time.

 

SPRAYER’S TIP: In your truck, carry a replacement rebuild kit for each type of spray gun you use frequently. Also, keep a supply of replacement rebuild kits for each type in the paintshop.

A. Call the shop foreman for quick delivery of a replacement rebuild kit for each spray gun you are using on-site. Also ask for a box of extra repair parts.

B. Call the nearest paint tool and equipment outlet that you deal with. Ask for a rush delivery.

C. Call your company boss, and ask him or her to buy a new spray gun and deliver it.

D. Do a rush clean-out of one spray gun, to get it back on the job. At least for that day.

E. At day’s end, tear down both spray guns. And do a complete overhaul.

 

By the way, sometimes you don’t have the time or resources to deal with a minor snag in the usual, standard, or acceptable way. When that’s the case, just do what you need to do to get the job moving forward.

 

BOTTOM LINE: Whatever comes along and stands in you and your crew’s way of getting the job done, do the best you can do at the time – and with what you have. And sweat about any repercussion later.

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It can take more skill and savvy to deal with the minor snags than the major job or project.

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Thank you for clicking into “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2018. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Paintshop Policies: Reporting Problems with Products and Materials

Every paintshop has policies and practices in place on how to handle problems that might crop up. And, every painter, as well as others that use that department, need to adhere to those policies.

 

In fact, each new department worker’s training must include this aspect of employment. At both the department level, and company-wide.

 

  1. Report all issues to immediate supervisor, shop foreman or company representative.
  2. Properly label paint products and supplies according to location in which they are used.
  3. Help others to choose the correct products for the surfaces, conditions and use/traffic situations.
  4. Document each problem beyond the normal-use level.
  5. Report any damage or loss to your supervisor.
  6. Determine and post “Paintshop Policies” and business policies.

 

Re: Products and materials used by you and teammates, or fellow crew members.

  1. Provide other departments with postable notices about procedures for reporting problems with products or materials to Paintshop and Engineering. TIP: Be sure to supply each department with notices to cover updates or changes in policies and procedures.
  2. With their and your supervisors’ permission, provide written suggestions on how to handle these problems.

Bottom Line: If you are the person responsible for the operations of the paintshop, stand firm. And, help others to follow those policies and procedures that you must follow.

 

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Running a paintshop requires one part policy, two parts consistency, and seven parts diplomacy.

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Thanks for doing your job to the best of your ability.

Thanks for your emails, and for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

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