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Archive for the ‘special projects’ Category

Painting It: Susika’s “First Real Bedroom”

 

Susika was a ten-and-a-half year old when we met. Her aunt and U. S. Marine uncle had brought her home with them, after the mass family funeral in the Middle East. On the plane, they promised her a “real bedroom.”

 

Uncle “J.J.” and several handy friends knocked out a wall to add six feet to the small 10-feet by 9-feet space.

 

Here’s how they outfitted what Susika called her “first real bedroom.”

 

  1. On 15-feet window wall: Built in a window seat, with bookshelves on each end, and two roomy, half-cupboards underneath.
  2. On each side of window seat unit: A roomy closet: one for clothes, the other for her “stuff.”
  3. On other three walls: Wall rails and one-half wainscoting.
  4. Floor covering: Wall-to-wall, commercial grade carpeting: Colors: Pastels in pink, rose, cranberry, mint green, forest green. Pattern: Splashes and Swirls.
  5. Bed Furniture: Wood twin bed, 6-drawer dresser, 2 night tables. From uncle’s elderly neighbors.
  6. Old wooden desk and chair. Shared by her mother and “J. J.” as children.
  7. Small arm chair. Once used by older cousin, now in college.
  8. Toy chest. Originally belonged to her uncle.
  9. Bean bag chair, vinyl. Color: Hot pink. New. A gift from that cousin in college.
  10. Four-shelf, three-drawer unit. For stuffed animals and dolls. Yard sale purchase.
  11. Bulletin-White board. For hanging above desk. Purchased at Wal-Mart.

MY JOB: Paint and finish coat everything paintable. And, there was a lot.

 

Susika chose her new room’s paint colors from Glidden’s® “Make It Magical with Disney” line.

(For information: www.disneypaint.com.)

Color scheme: Soft white, pastel pinks and greens, also tinted forest green.

Paints used: Interior semi-gloss and high-gloss latexes; also artist acrylics.

 

SURFACES and AREAS, COLORS

 

Ceiling: Glidden Color No. WDPR03. Color: A Wave of the Wand. Finish: Popcorn textured.

Upper and built-in walls, closets: Color No. WDPR03. Color: A Wave of the Wand (tinted Pink).

Rails, vertical wood wainscoting, doors, trim; also window and cupboard doors: Color No. WDPR08. Color: Fairest of Them All.

Furniture: Color No. WDPR10. Color: Water Lily.

33-year old 4-shelf/3-drawer unit: Base coat Color No. WDPR03. Color: A Wave of the Wand; Glazed Top coat: Color No. WDPR10 Color: Water Lily. Faux application: Random sponging.

Tops of dresser and night tables: 2-coat Faux glaze. Coat 1: Color No.: WDPR10. Color: Water Lily; Coat 2: Color No. WD FY05. Color: Fairy Flight. Faux application: Sponging, Ragging.

Built-ins and Window Seat Wall: Natural Stain; Sealer/Finish coat: Low-gloss polyurethane.

 

The entire painting project took a little more than a week. I used a large, cleaned out shed to re-finish the furniture pieces. It was equipped with central A/C. All other surfaces and areas were primed and finish-coated inside of the room.

 

PRODUCT MANUFACTURERS
Paints-Primers, finish coats: Glidden’s “Make It Magical with Disney.”

Stains, finish coats: Miniwax sealers, stains, varnishes, polyurethanes.

Artist Paints/Detailing: Liquitex Acrylics.

 

Painting and decorating children’s rooms is a lot of fun. Especially, when the painter is included in the project from the theme, design, color, and pattern selection stage.

  1. Every project is different. Every child’s preferences and needs are unique.
  2. The elements – theme, design, color, pattern – vary a lot.
  3. The products and materials used, in combination, are always one-of-kind.
  4. Working creatively within the budget draws on untapped energy, imagination and resources.
  5. A special sense of satisfaction bubbles forth as a child’s “special space” takes shape.

 

ABOUT SUSIKA
Susika’s completed room was very special for an added reason. She was a war orphan, legally adopted by her only living adult relative: an American military officer. Susika’s mother, the military officer’s sister, was an American educator that taught the children of enlisted officers stationed in the Middle East. Her father was a U. S. educated Middle Eastern professor and administrator.

 

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“My own room! It’s like having my private place in Heaven.”   Susika

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Thank you, fellow painters and decorators, for brightening the lives of others.
And, thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Decorative Finishing: The Lacquer Table

My childhood home had been an antique shop previously, in the 1950s and early 1960s.

 

Luxurious oriental wallpaper – black silk textured panels – still covered the walls of the largest room. An elegantly dressed Geisha knelt in the center of one of the panels, bordered in etched goldleafing.

 

All of the wallpaper was faded and worn from age. Each panel bore the signs of water damage.

 

On the longest wall was depicted a Teahouse scene. A dainty china tea service set on the low, glass-smooth black lacquer table. For seating, large silk-covered pillows were arranged on the floor. Rice paper sliding door panels could be seen in the background.

 

I did my homework, seated in a red-enameled, round-backed cane chair. Pulled up to a restored circa 1940s oblong, drop leaf table. My wandering eyes floated toward that Teahouse scene. Specifically, the lacquered table.

 

I promised myself that I’d decorate my first dining room in the oriental style.

 

In my early 20s, the inspiration came to design and build a small Oriental table, out of ebony wood.

To get the perfect black, lustrous finish, I applied nine coats of Glidden’s high-gloss enamel. Each coat was allowed to set and “cure,” at least four hours. Then, I did a light and thorough damp feather sanding with No. 1000 sandpaper. Followed by a complete surface “wipe,” using a barely damp, soft muslin cloth.

 

In 2010, the need for a laptop computer table motivated me to build a “lap table” sized version of that lacquer table. I did not apply as many coats of the black, high-gloss finish enamel, because of the lack of workshop space. And, the curing/drying time between coats was reduced – according to outdoor environmental conditions.

 

The mystique remained for the sleek, elegant oriental décor. Yet, a deeper appreciation for the natural in furniture finishing, refinishing, and restoration work had taken over.

 

In early 2013, a couple from Asia stayed at the hotel for over ten days. They were purchasing a second home in Celebration. They showed me two photos of a badly abused, 52-inch square table that came with the house.

 

The couple wanted to shorten the oak table, to 20-inches in height. Then, they wanted to refinish the table. To a mirror-smooth black lacquer. They wanted to do the entire project themselves. With a little guidance from me.

 

The husband and wife team turned out to be very talented. And handy with tools – painting, decorative finishing, and power.

 

One day after work, we met at their new house. A sprawling two-story, with many porches and balconies.

Using a level and steel ruler, we measured and marked the table legs for shortening. By my next visit, the couple had sawed down the legs. Also, they’d carefully cleaned and sanded every inch of the table.

 

At their request, we actually video-cammed the basic procedure:

 

  1. Repairing the table’s cracks, gouges, splinters, etc.
  2. Filling and smoothing out all surface imperfections.
  3. Dry and moist sanding the surfaces multiple times.
  4. Applying a very thin white sealer/primer.
  5. Applying five of the nine finish coats – with very fine, and gentle, sanding between each.

 

By the time the couple applied the fifth finish coat themselves, my job was completed. They had mastered the finishing process, at a high, non-professional level.

 

I never saw the finished Lacquer table. Until June of 2015. The couple and I spotted each other at a Home Depot. They invited me to their home the following week.

 

Upon my arrival, they urged me to take a very close look at their work.

 

“What a beautiful job!” I excitedly told them. And it was!

 

At their beautiful table, they served tea and homemade shortbread wafers, on a set of hand-painted china.

 

By the way, the Lacquer table sets in the middle of their traditional, oriental dining room. In their traditional, oriental decorated home.

 

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Some of the best decorative finishing is done by the most surprising craftspersons.

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Thank you, Tau Hong and Sum Li.

And, thank you everyone for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: Accent Colors Change Appearance and Enhance Amenities

Every four years, a small chain of London area boutique hotels changes its color on the accent wall in each guest room. The owners believe that their clientele, largely repeat visitors, appreciate this gesture.

 

“They like the uplift,” emailed the company’s senior painter. “We are careful to select a color that is just coming into vogue.”

 

For 2017, the hotels’ owners have authorized their (three) staff painters to also apply the new accent color to the vanity alcove and nearby walk-in closet in each room. “This blends the different areas together…” the painter added.

 

The guest reviews have been very positive. Examples: “Lovely effect when entering bath area.”  “Most inviting color unity.”  “Pleasant add-on.”  “Delightful change.”

 

The senior painter ended his e-mail by saying, “I recommend the accent wall for any room or area. It enhances appearance and updates the décor at minimal cost…”

 

 

10 ADVANTAGES TO ADDING ACCENT COLORS TO DÉCOR

 

  1. It changes the overall appearance of the specific area, and entire room.
  2. It changes the overall “feel” of the room.
  3. It freshens the overall look of the entire room or suite.
  4. It enhances the benefits of the standard amenities in the room or area.
  5. It upgrades the overall design of the room or suite.
  6. It updates the color scheme in the room or suite.
  7. It expands the standard color scheme’s customer/guest appeal.
  8. It expands the area’s marketability.
  9. It offers positive visual change at a marginal cost.
  10. It offers a way to use up premium paint in colors no longer a part of color scheme.

 

 

10 UNIQUE APPLICATION TIPS FOR USING ACCENT COLORS

 

  1. Reverse the “apply accent color to the wall” rule. Apply the accent color to the trim, doors and frames, and window sills located on one wall.
  2. Spray paint the ceiling in the new accent color.
  3. Use accent color to faux finish a 3-inch border around the parameter of the ceiling.
  4. Create a vertical stripe effect by alternatively painting the accent color every 2 or 3 inches over the wall’s existing color.
  5. Create a drop ceiling effect by applying accent color in a 3 inch border around ceiling, then down 3 inches at the top of all four walls.
  6. Paint accent color on the worst-condition wall and/or trim surfaces in a room.
  7. Paint accent color adjacent to the surface in the worst condition – eg. dents, poorly matched to touch-ups, gouges, minor water damage.
  8. Hardwood and/or tile floors? Paint “pathway” from inside entry doorway all the way to the bathroom’s tub area. Note: A clear over coat may be advisable.
  9. Create draped canopy effect on bed wall by painting accent color in alternate space, from marked vertical center.
  10. Paint 3-inch block border around one wall in room, painting alternate blocks in accent color.

 

You get the picture. When it comes to applying accent paint colors, your options are wide open!

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s World: Painting Unusual Projects

What are the most unusual paint projects that you’ve ever done?

 

10 Unusual Paint Projects Worked on By Other Painters

 

  1. Exterior and interior of Doberman’s custom dog house
  2. Tennis equipment storage of retired athlete
  3. Children’s-sized 3-room playhouse
  4. Garage interior room for small antique tool collection
  5. Miniature apartment interior for training city dogs “how to live in an apartment”
  6. Built-in notions and supplies closets for professional designer and seamstress
  7. Huge storage closet for tech geek
  8. Children’s 2-level treehouse
  9. Agri-seed museum
  10. School’s double flagpole and connecting platform

 

10 Unusual Paint Projects that I have Worked On

 

  1. Sandblasting and spraying vinyl coating on structural steel frame for train scale
  2. Painted geometric graphics in fluorescent colors in day care center
  3. Applied genuine grasscloth wallcovering to entire room – ceiling, walls, doors
  4. Painted piping and talk system that was being shipped to China
  5. Sandblasted and painted semi-tractor wrecker
  6. Stained woodwork for molded panel ceiling
  7. Painted church dome with Metallic Gold
  8. Sandblasted and epoxy-painted Olympic-sized swimming pool
  9. Applied foil wallpaper to large ceiling
  10. Brush and rolled steel tub frames for Wild West display

 

Probably, my father’s most unusual painting project was the interior of an underground bomb shelter. In particular, he painted the vertical wood panels inserted into the walls of the pre-cast 12-feet by 18 feet vault thick steel shell. The agri-businessman’s wife refused to even step in the security structure unless it “looked inviting and homey.”

 

Unusual painting projects tend to stretch our creativity, agility and patience. They also give us the opportunity to have lots of fun. To use colors in exciting, unexpected ways. To reach into our greater selves as craftspersons and artisans.

 

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Unusual painting projects can open the door to new, specialty career opportunities.

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Thank you for including “Painting with Bob” in your busy day.

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: Hotel/facility painter and custom finishes

Ordinarily, a hotel/facility painter will not be expected to restore or maintain custom finishes applied by fine artists. Example: Front lobby’s faux marbleized columns and fascia, done during original construction.

 

That job might change, however, when:

 

  1. management/owners want the job done, and will not contract for fine craftsmen to do it;
  2. something must be done about area, and the painting/decorating budget is frozen for the rest of the year;
  3. necessary repairs and replacement to the area – due to rain/water leak, major mold infestation, structural aging, fire damage – force a “restorative” level of painting.
  4. major reconstructive/upgrading requires “blending” old, original finishes with newly applied ones. Particularly in high traffic, frequently used areas – eg. luxury suites, conference centers, entertainment room.
  5. Management issues an order for you to maintain, duplicate, or restore custom finished surfaces/areas.

 

So, what do you do, when you’ve never applied a fine finish – not even in apprenticeship school?

 

SIX + ONE + THREE TIPS TO HELP YOU GET THE JOB DONE RIGHT!

 

  1. Create a sample board, made of the same construction material as the surface involved. Do a super job of duplicating the problematic finish on the surface/area. Repair, prepare and refinish by following the same steps you’d use on the real surface.
  2. Once both you and management are satisfied with the result on that sample board, find the most obscure and worst small section of the area to be redone.
  3. Repair, replace and refinish that section using the identical technique, products, supplies, and tools used on that sample board.
  4. If possible, let that refinished area stand for at least five full days. Preferably longer. See how it appears to you. Compare your redone section to the finish on the overall area.
  5. Encourage management and the big shots to take several look-sees. Invite a few very observant teammates to check it out, too.
  6. Get a written “special project order” signed and dated by the hotel’s/facility’s top management officer. Your supervisor’s order to proceed is not good enough. This approved order must include the following:

A. Project scheduling and completion date, based on your availability and regular work responsibilities (that you will still have to get done during this time);

B. List of all needed products, materials, supplies, tools, and equipment – as required;

C. Pre-signed and pre-dated requisitions for delivery of all needed items in “B.”

D. A “no interference and no changes statement,” leaving authority with you.

E. Statement about cordoning/securing entire work area for the time that you require;

F. A “project delay start date”, if management has not had required products, materials, etc. delivered according to agreed upon schedule.

 

ONE SCHEDULING TIP: Slot out time thirty days out from project start date, if possible. This gives everyone the ability to get their respective ducks in a row. You, teammates, supervisor(s), management, purchasing, suppliers, etc.

 

THREE SUCCESS TIPS:

 

  1. Do your best to work ahead on your regular tasks, work orders and projects. Hint: With your supervisor, do a weekly “walk through” to make sure you’re both covering the basics.
  2. One week out: Meet with your supervisor. Include teammate(s) that will be covering for you in getting regular work done. NOTE: By this point, the list of “to do’s” will have been agreed upon between you and your boss.
  3. One week out: Closely check your project inventory. Run through the list of products, materials, supplies, etc. Is everything ready? Has everything been delivered?

 

BOTTOM LINE: Keep in mind that you’re really at the mercy of management. Too often, what they say they want is not matched by their compliance to their part of the deal. Tread carefully, my friends!

 

FINAL NOTE – and CAUTION

I’m a stickler when it comes to “special projects” that flow from the desks of management. I never start one of these projects on the fly. And, I never proceed with any “special project” that everyone involved has not, in advance, committed to in writing!

 

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Certain faux finishing projects need to be redone by the experts.

And, you are not they, if you don’t know a lot about this specialized art form.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”
Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: Public, Private and Special Collection Libraries

Working on a library project offers some unique opportunities for a skilled painter and decorator to really stretch himself or herself to the outer limits.

 

I’ve worked on over nine libraries. Four of them were new construction projects. Five were major renovation or restoration projects.

 
1. Smallest library. A 2-story, 14,000 square feet brick building dating back to the 1820s. Originally a mansion, the structure had gone through several previous major repairs and conversions since being donated for the county public library.

Project: It involved a carpentry crew ripping out over 40 percent of the structure’s walls. Then they reconfigured that space to accommodate for the current and projected patrons’ changing needs and preferences.

My job: I helped install commercial wall vinyl on 75 percent of the walls. On the remaining walls, we installed carpet tiles, custom cut to a template design. Also, we repaired and filled, then re-stained and re-varnished all of the wood (mostly walnut) surfaces. That included cornices, dado, wainscoting, carved moulding and trim; stair railings and banisters; elevator exteriors and interiors; built-in seating areas and bookcases in special collection rooms.

 
2. Largest library. A 3-story, 48,000 square feet steel and glass framed university structure. The new construction project featured an interior atrium hallway on each level, between the outer shell and outer walls of every interior room.

Project funding: Two unrelated alumni had donated 60 percent of the total cost.

My job: I helped install nine wrap around murals. Also, three of us hung over 30,000 square yards of commercial vinyl. And, we painted or stained and clear coated just about every other surface. Mainly interior trim and molding, and cabinetry.

 

3. Most unique library. A special collections private library. Housed in a 2-story limestone and mortar structure, the 32,000 square feet original structure, built around 1897, had been used as a private children’s boarding school.

Building features: 12-to-16 feet high walls and many rotunda/recessed ceilings with hand-carved wooden insets; miles of mahogany and dark oak wood in dismal disrepair, and water damaged; built-in wood/glass display cases with carved pediments and stationary shelving, fully paneled enclosed mini reading/study rooms; five larger meeting rooms – paneled walls.

My job: Mainly, I repaired wood surfaces and areas, then re-stained and clear varnished.

Fun element: The children’s playroom had been preserved. The new owners of the library contracted separately three of us to fully restore the 18 feet wide by 42 feet long room.

 
4. Most beautiful library. A private law firm’s office, 2-story, approximately 26,000 square feet. Major remodeling project.

Features: A lot of expensive Cherrywood paneling, columns and arches, decorative moulding, dado (chair rails), and ornately carved bannisters.

My job: Our 2-men crew prepped and finished all surfaces. We installed three large rotunda custom murals – all forest and wild animal scenes; stained and clear coated large built-in cabinetry, also two paneled elevators (interiors/exteriors).

 

5. Most challenging library. A very large public high school.

My job: Our 3-men crew removed over 15, 000 square feet of wall vinyl, then reinstalled new five monochromatic colors of “Pebble” vinyl including inside 15 built-in, lighted display cases.

Note: During summer break (about six months later), we were re-contracted to go back and spray a high-gloss, rust and scratch proof enamel on all metal book shelving.

 

Being an avid reader and a lifetime library patron, I’ve enjoyed working on every library. Regardless of its type, size, condition, and complexity. Of course, some of the projects stretched me much further than I’d bargained for.

 

Bottom line on library projects: Know what you’re doing. Take on detail and finishing work surfaces and areas you are confident in handling. Push for the best quality supplies, tools and equipment that the budget will allow. And, don’t let anyone – especially the client – push you into applying products and materials faster than the manufacturers advise, and that you can guarantee quality results!

 

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Painting and finishing libraries can put your industry knowledge, application patience and surface wisdom to the test.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Painting Patterns: Giant Chessboard – Part II

In “Painting Patterns: Giant Chessboard – Part I,” posted February 10, 2o16, we covered a giant chessboard project that turned into a huge mess.

 

Here, we cover how the unique project – exterior driveway and courtyard, and interior main hallway, of a retired Chess champion’s large residence — was re-done. Beautifully! And right!

 

HOW THE PROJECT GOT STRAIGHTENED OUT

 

** A new paint crew came on board, and started from step one. **

 

 

PREP WORK OF ALL SURFACES

 

1. Lightly sanded driveway, courtyard and hallway.

2. Re-measured all three areas; then re-gridded surfaces, locating axis and connection points.

 

EXTERIOR AREAS – Driveway and Courtyard

 

1. Sprayed S-W 30 Seconds Outdoor Painter’s Prep Cleaner (124-7485) onto both surfaces.

2. Hosed off both areas. Let dry completely (4 hours).

3.  Sprayed H&C Concrete Etch Solution onto driveway and courtyard areas.

4. Plumb-lined, then taped grid lines and block edges. Tape: ScotchBlue 2097; 2090.

5. Labeled Autumn Brown and Natural Tan blocks, on grid. Used color-coded tapes.

6. Cut in, then painted Tan blocks on driveway. H&C Concrete Solid Color Stain/Sealer, S-B.

— Two, 2-men teams worked from center of each row outward, in opposite direction.

— First man on team cut in, then second filled in blocks. Rollers: 3/8 in. nap by 3 in., and 9 in.

7. Cut in, then painted Autumn Brown blocks. Followed technique used in No. 5.

8. Rolled first coat of H&C Concrete Sealer Wet Look on driveway. Rollers: ¼ in. nap x 12 inch.

9. Cut in, then painted courtyard chessboard: Natural Tan blocks, then Autumn Brown.

10. Rolled on first coat H&C Concrete Sealer Wet Look onto courtyard. Roller: ¼ in. nap x 12 in.

— Let surface dry for 24 hours.

11. Rolled on second coat of H&C Wet Look. SharkGrip Slip Resistant Additive mixed in paint.

12. Sprayed one coat of H&C Concrete & Driveway Protector onto both surfaces.

 

INTERIOR AREA – Floor/Main Hallway

 

1. Covered hallway walls with 4-mil plastic sheeting; ceiling with 6-mil.

— Used special masking tape; walls papered in Grass Cloth.

2. Smooth-sanded wood floor, using graduated grit disks, 400-to-1000, on orbital sander.

— Thoroughly vacuumed after each grit sanding.

3. Primed with S-W Multi-purpose (wood)*. Roller: ¼ in. nap x 12 in. roller. * Primer optional.

4. Plumb-lined, then taped grid lines and block edges. Used T-square to “square” all corners.

Tape: ScotchBlue 2090/Orig. Multi-use; 2080EL/Advanced Delicate.

5. Labeled Meadow Brown and Naturel Tan blocks, from axis out. Used color-coded tape.

6. Cut in, then painted Tan blocks, front doorway to back entry.

Paint: S&W Porch and Floor Enamel. Brushes: 1 ½ in./angled; Rollers: 3/8 in. nap x 9 in.

7. Cut in, then painted Meadow Brown blocks. Brushes, rollers: Same as for Tan blocks

8. Let area dry for 24 hours.

9. Gently “glass-sanded” floor; carefully vacuumed immediately.

10. “Fan-sprayed” on Sherwin-Williams MinWax Polyurethane, semi-gloss clear.

NOTE: Everyone on the team closely followed paint manufacturers’ instructions for each product.

 

WHO DID RE-DO PROJECT

 

1. 5 Journey-level painters, including foreman;* also 1 apprentice.

— 5 experienced in application of specialty exterior products.

— 1 also highly skilled decorative painter/finisher – interior work.

* Note: Journey foreman also served as project manager, with over 21 years of experience.

 

HOW LONG RE-DO PROJECT TOOK

 

1. Prep work: 3 days.

2. Painting: 8 days.

3. Clean-up: 1 full day.

* Note: Time did not include “rained out” days. (There were four.)

 

WHAT PAINT PRODUCTS WERE USED – A Summary

 

* Exterior surfaces: Sherwin-Williams 30 Seconds Outdoor Painter’s prep Cleaner; S-W H&C Concrete Etch Solution; S-W H&C Concrete Solid Color Stain/Sealer, solvent-based; S-W H&C Concrete Sealer Wet Look (topcoat); S-W H&C SharpGrip Slip-Resistant Additive; S-W H&C Concrete & Driveway Protector.

* Interior surface: S-W Multi-Purpose (wood) Primer; S-W Porch and Floor Enamel, satin: Meadow Trail (Brown), Naturel Tan; S-W MinWax Polyurethane Super Fast Dry, semi-gloss.

 

WHAT PROJECT COST – Approximate

 

1. Original estimate:   Paint: $5,200 Labor: $ 2,400 Total: $7,600

2. Rescue/Re-Do cost: Paint Products: $15,043.83 Labor: $10,060 Total: 25,103.83*

* Does not include cost for tools and supplies.

3. ** Owner cost: Paint: $0.00; Supplies: $0.00; Labor: $0.00; Legal fees: $4,000. Total: $4,000

** Final figures, after settlement.

 

See upcoming post: “Chessboard Project Supplies Chart and Computations.”

 

WHO PAID FOR PROJECT RE-DO

 

Final decision: “Split responsibility.” Real estate company that “subcontracted” job to painting contractor, that employed first two painters. * Original paint crew’s work was not guaranteed.

 

HOW DIFFICULT “CHESSBOARD” WAS TO STRAIGHTEN OUT

 

“It could have been worse,” said the paint foreman/project manager, a retired IUPAT member from N.W. Indiana. He’d moved to Florida in 1995 to get the opportunity to work on “extreme, detail projects.” I have to say: That guy was really in his element. And, an amazing craftsman!

 

How I was involved in project

 

Found paint foreman/project manager, helped identify crew members; helped with product selection, surface testing, and estimating; advised about layout, gridding, and procedures. (My services were gratis. A family friend of property owner.)

 

See upcoming post: “Chessboard Project Supplies Chart and Computations.”

 

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Complicated jobs are nothing more than simple jobs with more steps.

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Have a safe and satisfying day, everyone. And, many thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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