Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

Archive for the ‘surface preparation’ Category

Painting It: The Fast and Easy Way

Just to clarify things: Easy and fast is not necessarily the most recommended way to paint something. However, for everyone, we sometimes want things to go a little easier or to happen a little quicker.

 

Painting is no different. By taking some precautions, we can guarantee some degree of quality, no matter how fast or easy the work is. Having the right amount of skill is usually the ticket.

 

There are any number of items that can be painted the easy way, and as fast as you might want to complete them. Example: Using an airless spray system, I once prime finished just under 3000 linear feet of molding in less than an hour. When calculated using a brush and/or roller, it would have taken the entire day. Yes, a high level of productivity can be achieved daily, depending on the situation.

 

A FEW PREP-LEVEL TIPS

 

  1. Make an assessment of the project.
  2. Determine the steps needed to complete the project. The general rule is: The fewer steps there are, the easier it will be to complete. And, you will be finished in no time.
  3. Next, evaluate how difficult it will be to complete each step. Example: To paint a louvered door, you must (a) sand each piece of wood or metal as the case may be, (b) dust the surface, and (c) apply the paint using your chosen method. Here, the process of sanding can slow the paint process down quite a bit. It would be no big deal, if all you had to do was paint it.

 

So, how can you make a job easy, or develop a faster way of doing it? Let’s take the easy part of it first. You might want to follow the steps below.

 

  1. Answer this question: What is the largest size brush to use for painting this surface? A 1-inch brush is used for detail and glass framework. A 4-inch brush is used for flat, open wall areas and wide trim such as crown molding. Determine which one’s best suited for you and the job.

 

  1. When selecting a roller system: Relate the viscosity of the paint to the type of surface. Applying paint with a roller is easiest if the paint spreads smoothly, and you don’t have to dip the roller every five seconds. Example: Use a 3/8 inch roller cover when painting brick or concrete block. And, you will fight it the entire time.

 

  1. What can be easier than using a spray gun? Assess the surface and which spray tip is the most appropriate to apply the paint evenly. For those of you familiar with tip sizes, a 3-11 is best suited for trim painting and multiple small objects. It is possible to work yourself to death painting large wall spaces with a small tip. Recommendation: A 4-17 or 5-21 are the optimum choices here.

 

 Now: How can you paint this faster than, say, the last time? Think: Spray it!

 

A well-seasoned painter, with comprehensive knowledge in spray painting, will know intuitively how to get the most out of his spray work. Here are several things that he or she might bring to the attention of a less experienced painter.

 

  1. Completely strain the paint prior to siphoning or pressurizing. This step cannot be stressed enough.
  2. Make sure that all system filters are clean. Replace at regular intervals.
  3. Make sure the spray tip is not worn, and does not leak as you trigger the gun.
  4. Assess hourly use of each spray tip per manufacturer recommendations with type of paint.
  5. Thin paint or coating material to the proper viscosity NOTE: This will increase ease of paint flow and pumping efficiency.
  6. At all times, maintain a posture and spray gun motion which is perpendicular to the surface. 7. Cover everything within close proximity to the work that does not get painted. Use plastic sheeting, paper and drop cloths.
  7. Use a mask as necessary – one appropriate for the product, space, exposure, ventilation, etc.

 

How to Optimize Ease and Speed in Unison

 

Normally, I would consider it difficult to work fast and for the work to be easy at the same time. It takes some concentration to achieve what you’re looking for. There a few things you can do.

 

  1. Spray finish as much as possible before having to bring out the roller and brush. Your productivity will be considerably higher; and the hand tool use won’t have worn you out.

 

  1. Use a roller system in place of where you typically would have used a brush.

 

  1. Upgrade or vary the brush size from what you would normally use.

 

  1. Provide the highest level of surface preparation available.

 

To make a paint job easier, it is not necessary to cut corners or costs. Ease comes with experience: knowing how to complete a task using a sound and simple method versus getting too involved.

 

Start simple and build from there. Example: Don’t try to strip wood without using a chemical remover.

 

Fast means: You will be done sooner and generally make more money. Just don’t sacrifice quality and end up back where you started: behind schedule.

 

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I hope that you enjoyed your Thanksgiving holiday. Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob,”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Painting It: Things That Can Go Wrong

Following directions, specifications, and recommendations is not a guarantee that you won’t have a problem on the job. The quality of a paint job depends on certain variables such as weather conditions, cleanliness of the surface, exposure to the sun, and amount of foot traffic.

 

Below I will describe two personal scenarios that illustrate exactly what I am talking about.

 

SCENARIO 1: The subject is a never-before painted panelized exterior wall surface made from a ceramic type substrate. The two-foot square tiles have a glazing which is highly polished.

 

Process for Scenario 1

 

1.Problem: Remove smooth glaze.

Solution: Sand surface by using orbital sander with #80 grit abrasive disc.

Result: Surface gloss is removed; good anchor pattern is produced.

 

2. Use recommended primer. Apply two-part epoxy type primer; thin accordingly with Methyl Ethyl Ketone; then spray finish using airless system.

 

3. Let material cure overnight.

 

4. On-site inspection revealed broad paint failure. Paint released from the surface; peeling on more than 80% of the total surface.

 

5. Manufacturer investigated claim. Checked for proper surface preparation and moisture content. Inspection determined that the cause of paint failure was due to primer being incompatible to substrate type. The use of an epoxy primer was refuted by the manufacturer. They said its recommended use was for bare metal surfaces only.

NOTE: The directions called for either that, or a chemically or abrasive etched surface.

 

6. Recommendation: Recondition surface; and apply an exterior alcohol based shellac type product. Finish with desired topcoat.

 

7. The surface withstood the new application; job well done.

 

 

SCENARIO 2:  The surface is a linear bare roof flashing made from aluminum.

 

Process for Scenario 2

 

1. Problem: Paint bare metal flashing.

Solution: Sand surface according to instruction, using #120 grit sandpaper.

Result: Created anchor pattern for paint to adhere to.

 

2.Use recommended oil based primer using brush and roller methods. Let cure overnight.

 

3. Following day inspection revealed total paint failure. One hundred percent of surface peeled and surface had an unexplained oily feel to it.

 

4. Manufacturer inspection ensued. The surface preparation and chosen product were approved. A moisture test was completed, with negative results. The metal was determined to be polished bare aluminum, not compatible with an oil based primer.

 

5. Recommendation: Recondition surface. Sand appropriately with #120 grit sandpaper. Treat with Muriatic acid wash; and rinse with water. When dry, apply thin coat of galvanizing metal primer by brush and roller. Finish with desired topcoat.

 

6. Finished product acceptable; it withstood the scratch test.

 

Adhesion problems to look out for: oily residue on surface, humidity over 72%, dust, alkaline or cracked surface, substrate incompatible with primer or finish material.

 

Methods for correcting adhesion problems: Sand surface with abrasive that corresponds to the surface’s smoothness. Wipe surface with de-glossing agent or high evaporating solvent. Use tack cloths to all but rough surfaces. Paint exterior surfaces on a dry day.

 

It is easy to overlook a step in preparing a surface. If you do that too often, you will be reminded of it when you are least likely to want it.

 

Give preparation the time it deserves. It will pay off in the final product. So will the customer.

 

Rule of thumb: When painting, keep a rag in one pocket and a piece of sandpaper in the other. Believe me, you will need them.

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: Solving Surface Preparation Problems

 

A paint job continues to look good, as long as there are no failures in the surface or in the paint or coating material. The causes of such failures boil down to two main areas: moisture and sun related exposure.

 

A substrate – eg. drywall, masonry, wood, or steel – has limiting factors related to the type of environment it is able to resist. Typically, they are based on the substrates ability to repel the thing which can effect it the most.

 

Example: An improperly prepared drywall surface will absorb water and its gypsum construction will lose its strength.

 

Another example: A steel surface, etched and primed incorrectly, will start to rust more quickly and lose its structural integrity. Of course, with steel, prepped properly, it takes much longer.

 

To prevent this from happening, a specific coating can be applied. Also, this ensures a long life to the surface. Basically, it’s called the “prime and top coat system”.

 

If the surface hasn’t been prepared as best as it could have, negative results can occur. If there has been an environmental exposure of some kind, negative results can occur.

 

SOME NEGATIVE RESULTS – AND SOME IMPORTANT REMEDIES

 

1. Rusting metal – peeling paint.

A. Invasive correction: Sandblasting, fiber glassing, metal replacement.

B. Superficial repair: Auto Body filler, wire brushing, sandpapering, naval jelly application. Priming surface with alkyd, epoxy, urethane or zinc coating.

2. Peeling Paint – wood.

A. invasive correction: Removal of loose, flaky dry paint by sandpapering, abrasive wheel cleaning, chemical paint stripper.

B. Superficial yet effective repair: Pressure clean surface. Prime surface with acrylic latex, oil based coating, alcohol based specific to interior/ exterior.

3. Bubbles – Usually localized, not invasive or widespread.

A. General repair method: Removal by sandpapering to feather edge, scraping, wipe surface with adhesion promoter.

B. TIP: Prime with oil based or fast dry acrylic latex.

4. Alligatoring – Paint applied too thick, surface overheated/overexposed to sun, problem with solvent evaporation.

A. Invasive correction: Sandpapering and smoothing out, or stripping entire surface. Then, if necessary, spackling of smoothing compound.

B. TIP: Use body filler for metals, joint-type compounds for drywall or plastered surfaces.

 

The final results of your project are dependent, inherently, on surface preparation. The time and method you take to properly prepare a surface will ultimately produce a beautiful and lasting finish. And, doing it the right way can ensure that the money spent is done wisely.

 

Remember: Follow your surface preparation procedures to guarantee the best quality job imaginable. And when you think you’ve sanded enough? Sand some more.

 

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Every smooth, durable finish coat has a surface prep story to tell.

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Thanks, everyone, for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

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