Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

Archive for the ‘Wallcoverings’ Category

Painting Them: Closets with Class

Add appeal, style and even a new life to closets, or closet alcoves, in your hotel, facility – or home.

 

1. Paint the entire area in a color that complements with the room’s color. Example: Room color: off-white, closet color: light sand.

TIP: Use up some interior paint color no longer needed, because of a property color scheme change.

 

2. Paint the most visible closet wall in the same color used in the room. Paint the side walls in a contrasting color.

 

3. Create horizontal border effect on all of the closet walls.

A. Paint lower two-third of walls the same color used in room.

B. Paint upper one-third of walls in white, or contrasting color.

C. Or, reverse it: Contrast or white on lower part, main room’s color as upper border.

 

4. Paint all walls white, or light tint of the color on room’s walls.

Install wallpaper border on the room wall outside of the closet, running it around walls inside the closet.

 

5. Install remnant wallcoverings, purchased at paint store. Mix and match.

A. Supplier tip: Check with major local contractors that do a lot of wallcovering installation.

B. Shopping tip: Look for colors that complement or contrast with your regular color scheme.

C. Material tip: Look for white-on-white stripes, subtle patterns, textures that remind you of scenes/areas/amenities on your property.

D. Great find: Commercial grade products. Examples: Designs such as pebbles, grasscloths, hemps; laminated wood veneers; leathers. These wallcoverings are very durable, and usually come in wide panels. NOTE: Many tend to be heavier, and harder to handle.

 

6. Install wallpaper or vinyl on the most visible wall in the closet, or closet alcove. After painting other walls in lighter hue of nearest room wall color.

 

7. Install complementary wallcoverings on adjoining walls of closet, or closet alcove.

 

GENERAL TIPS:

Colors: Keep it/them light, and neutral.

Textures: Keep it/them durable, easy-to-clean and similar.

Patterns: Keep them complementary to others in the area, and to those used in adjoining room.

Special Effects: As creative as you can get. As creative as management will let you be.

Panel directions: Horizontal, vertical, diagonal. Whatever!

 

A CLOSET WITH A VIEW. . .

 

A relative in Ohio moved into a large corner studio in an assisted living facility. She had one window. It overlooked the end of a parking lot. She had two closets.

 

Her grandsons decided to turn the smaller closet into a work-computer space for Grandma Anne.

 

1. They installed a soft, pink-on-white vertical striped wallpaper on the room’s wall, adjacent to the window wall.

2. They installed the same wallcovering on the two side walls of the closet.

3. On the closet’s back wall, they installed a “window garden scene” panel of wallpaper, with the same pink-on-white pattern/background as the panels hung on the closet’s side walls.

4. Inside the closet, they installed a remnant white marble laminate counter.

5. On one end, they installed adjustable shelving, that faced the counter, not the doorway.

6. Under the counter, they slid in a two-drawer metal cabinet, repainted high-gloss petal pink.

7. With management’s written authorization, the grandsons ran a multiple-plug panel from the room’s nearest outlet, into the closet, on the floor. No lighting fixtures were installed in the closet. Mainly because of code regulations and property restrictions.

 

Today, Anne sits at her counter…emails family and friends…does on-line personal business…and enjoys the special outside view.

 

Closets can be great fun to decorate.

 

The creative opportunities are endless. Their smaller dimensions, standardly, make them perfect spots to use up fabulous, left-over, better or top quality products and materials. To experiment with new layouts, and techniques. To try new combinations of colors, patterns and textures.

 

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Try a closet on for size! Make each one a little unique!

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Thank you for taking an interest in your space. And for visiting “Painting with Bob.”
Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Designing with Graphics Using Wallcoverings

 

Rainbow Farm in Vinyl

Blue Sphere

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Various types of wall covering can be applied to achieve part or all of your chosen graphic design. The possibilities are endless because a very wide selection is available.

 

About “Rainbow Farm in Vinyl”: Graphic design covers two adjacent corner walls. Overall dimensions: 42 feet length by 9 feet height. Design features abstract symbols of a modern recreation farm: buildings and structures, flowers and gardens, fields with lush crops, animals, Christmas tree nursery, vehicles. Templated symbols were cut from commercial-grade vinyls. The variety of colorful and textured remnants came from two large elementary school projects.

 

About “Blue Sphere”: Graphics free-form stripe wraps around two adjacent walls, trailing into a large walk-in closet. Overall dimensions: 12 feet-to-8 feet-to-9 feet length by 8 feet-to-6 feet height. Design features one graduated, 12-inch to 8-inch horizontal stripe. Free-style form was cut from mini-pebble textured commercial vinyl, spliced into already-installed off-white decorative stone-textured ceiling-to-floor commercial vinyl.

 

The layout is similar to the painting process. The work can be compared to doing a puzzle.

 

Before you can install the wallcovering, many pieces of various sizes and shape will have to be fashioned.

 

Each separate piece will need to be pasted with the appropriate adhesive or paste. NOTE: Some will require vinyl paste while others may need wheat or cellulose.

 

The following process is meant for the skilled paperhanger.

 

CREATING TEMPLATES FOR WALLCOVERING PIECES

 

1. Create a paper sketch of wall area.

 

2. Sketch in your design to scale.

 

3. Use grid paper, or graphic software program. Example: 1 inch = 1 foot.

A. Number each piece within design.

B. Use larger grid paper to transfer shapes to full-size.

C. Gridded architectural or engineering paper works great for this.

D. Be certain to number each piece to correspond to piece’s number in sketch.

 

INSTALLING/APPLYING WALLCOVERING PIECES INTO GRAPHIC DESIGN

 

1. To apply wallcovering to stripe areas, pre-trim pieces on zinc strip to fit.

 

2. Then, paste material. Be sure to use the paste/adhesive appropriate for that piece.

 

TIP: I’ve used small, neon-colored sticky notes to “label” front of each piece. Here’s how:

On 8 ½ inch by 14 inch paper, I’ve made a chart. I glued tiny sample of each type of wallcovering to be used. Next, I wrote the type of paste/adhesive to be used for that type of covering. Then, I assigned a neon color sticky note to each type, and adhered one alongside the corresponding wallcovering sample.

 

3. Butt (align) the seams of the pieces and smooth out wallcovering.

 

4. When several pieces are fitted, use a straight edge and razor knife to trim excess to even out any edge or seam joint. Much patience is needed here.

 

5. Where irregular sized and shaped pieces are to fit irregular sized and shaped pieces, I recommend one or both of the following methods:

 

  1. Method 1: Pre-cut each piece.
  2. Match each piece to a template, before adhering to wall with paste/adhesive.
  3. Several pieces, that will adjoin each other, can be trimmed and matched together at the paste table before applying.

 

  1. Method 2: Overlap the seams of adjoining pieces.
  2. Double-cut through the two layers.
  3. With straight lines, trimming is easy.

 

TIP 1: When making curved or arched cuts, always make up plastic templates that precisely match the curvature of the penciled line. Normally, you will need only a half dozen to allow for the making of your other cuts.

 

TIP 2: Change your razor blades more regularly.

 

6. Smooth all wall covering in multiple directions to remove creases and bubbles.

 

7. Using a seam roller, press down all seams and edges.

 

8. Use just enough pressure to adhere the wallcovering piece to the substrate.

 

9. Work quickly while ensuring a perfect job.

 

10. Wash the seam roller as needed.

 

TIP: In some instances, it is invaluable to use special seam glue and a heat gun to manipulate the material more precisely.

 

Remember: All wall coverings are not applied using the same method.

 

TIP: If various types of coverings are used, be ready to work with each one a little differently to fit each piece of the graphics together.

 

A large graphic design project . . .

 

On one occasion, I applied a vinyl graphics design in a corridor over one hundred and fifty feet long. It turned out magnificent in the end. However, it was difficult to achieve. The entire length of the hallway set on a slope. And the stripes and curves, that made up the design, were at eye level.

 

When doing graphics using wallcovering, both patience and precision are required to achieve favorable results.

 

And remember: Create a sample first!

 

Footnote: Fortunately, creating great graphics using wallcoverings is a breeze, compared to trying to transfer media files into this post. Any tips from anyone?  Thanks in advance!

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.” Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Getting Unemployed Properties “Back to Work” – Part 1

One of my mother’s established clients, and two of his friends, purchased shut-down school properties. Then, the men transformed them into facilities needed in their respective communities.

 

A few examples…

 

  1. A one-story elementary school, near Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, was turned into a summer camp for boys and girls from low-income families.

 

  1. A one-story elementary school in northeastern Illinois was remodeled, then licensed as a community-owned and operated nursing home and rehabilitation center.

 

  1. A small, two-story high school, in the Chicago area, was reconfigured to serve as the new home for an overcrowded orphanage.

 

During a twenty-year span, the three entrepreneurs saved over fifty abandoned structures from demolition. In every instance, their goal was to put the property to good use in its local community.

 

For every remodeling project, local people were employed to do the work.

 

  1. A large advance crew cleared out and cleaned up the property, before any other work could proceed.

 

  1. A general contractor handled the rest of the project. That included the employment of the different types of skilled trade and craft persons needed to pull off that particular type of project.

 

The abandoned properties shared many problems.

 

  1. The buildings had been closed up at least two years, usually over three.
  2. The seasonal elements – rain, snow, ice, wind, heat, mold and mildew, etc. – had taken their toll on both the interiors and exteriors of the building(s), also the land.
  3. Sand, wild plants, wild creatures, pests of all sorts, etc. had taken up residence – and in the most unbelievable of areas/spaces.
  4. Woods had warped, rotted, cracked, and separated.
  5. Paint had chipped, faded, crackled,  and washed off many, if not all, surfaces.
  6. Wood stain had paled and turned a greenish black, or black.
  7. Varnishes had cracked and turned ugly shades of grey, or weird shades of red or yellow.
  8. Commercial grade wallcoverings had separated from their backings, and/or peeled from the walls. Then, stuck to the floors.
  9. Exterior metalwork, rails, fencing, doors, windows, frames, etc. had been beaten severely by the weather, and years of neglect. Some of it before the property had been closed down.

 

Working on any of the projects was not an painter’s idea of a dream job. Well, not for most. Even when the pay scale was high, and his or her contractor-boss was likeable, fair and accountable.

 

In July, a retired commercial painter e-mailed that he’d worked on several properties purchased by Jerry’s group.

 

“I was a moderately skilled painter on my first project done for them. I needed the job. Jerry said he saw my drive and potential. By the time we finished that first school, I’d used every skill I’d learned in apprentice school. And, I worked into a steady job, helping to save abandoned small schools, hospitals, motels, etc. Gratifying work if you can fit into it!”

 

I never knew the inventor-entrepreneur that led the small group of property benefactors. He wore many hats.

 

But, his worn coverall appearance, and laid-back, no-nonsense approach to nearly everything that he did was legendary. And, respected. Even among the infamous street gangs – eg. Hell’s Angels – that terrorized and paralyzed older neighborhoods on the northwest, west, and southwest sides of Chicago.

 

Saving shut-down and abandoned properties has become popular, as the “GO GREEN” philosophy and approach grows in North America. And, around the globe.

 

Each of us, including painters, has a role in preserving and protecting the natural resources we have. In  restoring, reviving and revitalizing properties and buildings that already exist. Especially when they are restorable or revivable.

 

Welcome any opportunity to do what you can. One of those opportunities is to repair-renovate-restore-rejuvinate-retrofit-re-use our buildings. And, the lands upon which they set.

 

Read Part 2: Painting Them: Getting Unemployed Properties “Back-to-Work.”

 

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A painter is as entrepreneurial and innovative as the next person – including in the reviving and revitalizing of existing man-made resources.

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Thanks, everyone, for doing your part to make this world better for others.

And, thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved

PAINTING AND DECORATING: THE HOTEL PENTHOUSE

A Central Florida hotel gave me the choice of three redecorating projects:

 

  1. larger penthouse,
  2. front lobby, or
  3. outdoor children’s play-town.

 

I opted for the penthouse. The other two projects were put on hold by the property management company.

 

Why the penthouse project got my vote: The diversity of creative decorating opportunities.

 

  1. Interior work – A/C, controlled environment.
  2. Fine finishing surfaces: paneling, columns, furniture.
  3. Lots of wallcovering installation, including mural.
  4. Custom color matching: paint-to-patterned wallcoverings.
  5. Faux finishing.
  6. Minimal traffic
  7. Management’s style, commitment and candor.

 

I scheduled the project into twelve main phases:

 

  1. Needs assessment by room, area, square footage, surface conditions, and preparation requirements.
  2. Products, materials, supplies costing-to-budget allotment; selection and coordination; quantity estimating and computation; requisitioning to purchasing.
  3. Wood furniture and woodwork stripping or bleaching.
  4. Wallcovering removal.
  5. Ceilings, walls, doors repairing, patching, filling.
  6. Wood repairing, filling, sanding, sealing.
  7. Ceilings, walls priming.
  8. Woodwork, doors, furniture re-staining and light sanding.
  9. Painting.
  10. Woodwork, doors, furniture finishing.
  11. Wallpaper and mural hanging.
  12. Faux finishing.

 

I was responsible for all aspects of the project except:

 

  1. delivery delays of custom wallcoverings and murals,
  2. purchasing department delays, errors, etc.

 

The one twist: The hotel president’s wife, a retired ASID member, would be included in the selection of the wallcoverings, and murals. In reality, the lady showed up on site once a week during the entire project. She put herself “to work.” She helped whichever hotel maintenance technician may have been assisting me on that day.

 

The project moved right along.
Complete shutdown was needed only two days – carpenter, plumber, tile man. The flooring people installed new carpeting after I completed my work. Note: I waited to re-install the re-finished baseboards until after the flooring was installed.

 

A FEW TIPS FOR ANY SIMILAR PROJECT THAT YOU MAY BE CONSIDERING

 

Before you sign on, you might want to do the following:

 

  1. Find out where the hotel’s purchasing manager orders the bulk of paint products and wallpaper materials.
  2. Clear with management – get it in writing – for YOU to be the person that visits the paint store and communicates with product/material representatives.
  3. Set it up so that YOU are the person that puts together the actual requisition order schedule and lists, for the purchasing manager to follow.
  4. Get a list – in writing – of all other work that will be taking place in the area. See that it includes the approximate “schedule blocks” of work days for every other craftsperson. Examples: carpenters, electricians, plumbers, tile installers, drywall installers.

 

BEST CASE SCENARIO:

 

  1. Hotel management sets it up and authorizes YOU to actually do the ordering from suppliers.
  2. You work under ONE member of management.
  3. You have access to other members of organization – supervisors, managers, staff – as needed.
  4. Feedback from managers is limited, and direct. No filtering through a chain of people.
  5. Project inspections are limited, and conducted by person(s) with authority to assist and act.
  6. “Sightseeing” visits by managers and staff members are kept to minimum, even discouraged.

 

HOW THINGS WENT:

  1. The hotel’s staff was friendly, helpful and totally enthusiastic. Especially the staff painter, and the engineering department, as a whole.
  2. The project came off without any major glitch – eg. shipment delay of custom wallcoverings.
  3. The project came in under budget – a surprise, even to me.
  4. The project was completed one week early. (Another surprise.)
  5. The carpenters, electricians, plumbers, drywallers, and tile installers stuck to the master schedule – and theirs. Great teams!
  6. Final inspections came off with only minor changes.
  7. The hotel management company signed off promptly.
  8. The hotel’s principal owner flew in for a final walk-through – and “staff only open house.”

 

Would I pick that “penthouse project” again? Yes! Though it was the first one that I’d worked on solo. And, it was the largest: over 4,000 square feet, including the veranda.

 

TIP FOR TOP QUALITY INTERIOR FINISHERS:

 

Ask around. There’s bound to be a hotel, resort, or residential penthouse somewhere that needs your special, fine touch. If nothing else, offer to help the staff painter get it into shining shape again.

 

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Special thanks to everyone that has helped others do a great job at their chosen work.

And, thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: 9: Guest WI-FI and Interactive Communication Centers

BASIC FEATURES and AMENITIES of TYPICAL AREA

 

  1. Walls: Preferably, smooth surface painted in white or pastels, non-distractive colors.
  2. Flooring: Preferred light-colored ceramic or vinyl tiles.
  3. Workstation space: Features may include simulated marble or stone surface; cabinetry or natural-stain finish hardwood type oak.
  4. Seating: Soft cushioned seats with strong lumber support and braces.
  5. Lighting: Track lighting preferred, due to its focusing capabilities.
  6. Special features: Dropped keyboard position might also be considered to relieve neck, lower arm and back fatigue.
  7. Other amenities: Eg: All-purpose printer/copy/scanner/fax system; phone access. TIP: Allow for quickest access possible.
  8. Windows/Window treatments: Tinted glass. Window treatments necessary for privacy, or to block luminations from outside lighting sources – eg. parking lot light pole, vehicle headlights, signage/billboards, other buildings, neighboring properties, roadways.
  9. Doors/doorways: Use semi-gloss/gloss white paint, or light-colored stain finish. If not in workstation area, finish as desired.

 

TIP: WINDOW and/or DOOR FRAMES and TRIMS.

 

Paint same color and texture/pattern as adjacent door or wall surface. Intriguing effect: Paint to match nearest floor covering color and texture/ pattern.

1. Creates a flooring “extension.”

2. Can make room appear larger, or smaller.

3. Depends on overall room design, color scheme use, pattern/textile design/layout and size.

4. Well worth the detailing time.

 

COLOR SCHEMES and FINISH SHADES

 

  1. Predominant colors: Whites; pastel blues, greens, yellows, tan, beige, ecru, even light gray.
  2. Accent walls: A good bet! Pastel colors including blue-green, earth-tones.
  3. Walls: White preferred for its light value. Pastel cool colors are second choice: blues, greens.
  4. Ceilings: Flat white preferred. Minimizes glare.
  5. Flooring: Carpeting, tile squares. White or earth-tones; light browns, beiges, greens.
  6. Counter/workstation top: Same as walls or flooring.
  7. Seating: Black preferred. Also, darker and muted tones of green, blue, violet, cranberry.
  8. Furniture: Contemporary dark colors – eg. black, gray, burgundy, dark brown.

 

SPECIAL EFFECTS THAT ADD TO TECHY ATMOSPHERE

 

  1. Apply a wallcovering which has bright background color highlighted by reflective pattern.
  2. Create modern faux finish such as metallic look, or a striped wall.
  3. Install and finish multi-colored wood panels, with varied sheens of clear finish.
  4. Install patterned floor tile design.
  5. Hang photographs to illustrate history of electronic and media advances.

 

PAINTS, FINISHES, WALLCOVERINGS THAT ATTRACT TECHY GUESTS

 

  1. Paints: Multi-colored/textured spray finish; metallic coatings.
  2. Finishes: Gloss clear finishes; custom colored stains.
  3. Decorative finishes: Simulated metal and wood designs; custom hand-applied textures.
  4. Wallcoverings: Textured, metallic vinyls, reflective wallcoverings.

A. Patterns: Ink-printed wall designs, stencils.

B. Textures: See above.

C. Borders: Designed with geometric and/or metallic patterns.

D. Graphics: Bright colored, multi-layered designs, data symbols, social media symbols.

E. Scenics/Murals: Designs that incorporate techy views.

 

Example: In an Orlando area hotel, I installed a 14-foot long, one-wall techy-scene mural. It featured random “photo” frames of techy subjects and scenes, including social networking. Color scheme: Graduated hues, light white-yellow to light yellows. Great look. Background color: White-yellow. Final effect: Subtle, relaxing to eye, non-distracting. Note: The same and similar scenic murals are available in multi-hued greens, blues, greys, browns, and peach.

 

OTHER TIPS and RECOMMENDATIONS

 

1. The design should attract attention in its overview when approached.

This says, “This is exciting. This is the place to be.”

2. Painting and decorating elements should not distract the person, who is trying to use the computer, access and use WI-FI systems, use available printing/copying/scanning/faxing equipment/services, skyp, etc.

 

Staying connected is an essential part of the daily agenda of most hotel guests. Decorating hotel WI-FI connectivity centers in appealing and appropriate ways only adds to guests’ total experience. And, it inspires them to visit again. And again.

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Everything Looks Different Up Close – Even a Great Paint Job!

Notice the term, “great” paint job, not “good” paint job.

 

Up close: The 12-inch appearance surface test.

 

That means: Up close, the painted surface will look at least as good as it does less than twelve inches away.

 

That means: Up close, an inspector will see no paint runs, holidays, brush strokes, uneven tones (spread of paint), splatters, roller streaks, etc.

 

That means: Up close, the pattern of every panel of the wallcovering will match, “magnifying glass close.”

 

That means: Up close, the wallcovering panels will be smooth. Wrinkles will not be present. Small bubbles will disappear after the adhesive dries and the wallcovering shrinks (2-5 days).

 

That means: Up close, the seams of side-by-side wallcover panels will be “seamless seams.” No gaps, mismatches, stretching, etc.

 

That means: Up close, the seams of natural-fiber wallcover panels will show slightly, because of the natural variation of color.

 

That means: Up close, the patching and sanding of the surface will be smooth, or appropriate, for that surface – and area.

 

That means: Up close, the touch-up of any patched and sanded surface will blend in with the surrounding surface(s) and area.

 

That means: Up close, the drywall that has been replaced, taped and mudded will fit flush with the surrounding drywall – on all sides.

 

That means: Up close, the entire area, when primed, will look – and feel – uniform, even and smooth.

 

That means: Up close, a textured surface, with an evenly applied coating, will blend consistently with the areas adjacent to a random textured area.

 

That means: Up close, a spray painted finish on a smooth surface will have a well-blended sheen. The film thickness will be applied evenly, absent of runs and orange peel on the surface.

 

That means: Up close, wallcovering seams will be tight, blending in with the surface. The pattern will match exactly. No bubbles or paste will remain along any seam line, or on the surface.

 

That means: Up close, a gilded finish, such as metal leaf, will reflect very little through the surface. The metal leaf will be wrinkle-free, with no tears. And, the surface will be bubble-free.

 

That means: Up close, the drywall compound will lay smooth, eliminating all ridges from the knife pressure. The overlapping edge of compound and drywall will be ultra smooth.

 

That means: Up close, the gloss paint finish will be ultra smooth, and show no imperfections in the surface of the substrate – whether it is wood, metal or drywall..

 

That means: Up close, the body filler application will leave a smooth finish, that is visually non-porous, and shows no high and/or low spots.

 

That means: Up close, the stain finish will be applied evenly, with no visible wipe or drip marks, or floating pigment.

 

That means: Up close, a properly sanded surface will show no deep sanding marks. With wood, sanding will be with the grain. With other substrates – eg. metals or painted wood – sanding marks will overlap in a subtle crisscross pattern.

 

 

That means: Up close, every time, on every surface, the painter makes every effort to leave behind a great job! Actually, both up close, and further away than 12 inches from the surface.

 

 

TIP: “Take your time and get it right!” Brian Santos, The Wall Wizard.

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Painting It: Keeping That Hotel Renovation Beautiful!

Once a renovation is completed, what must be done to protect its condition on a continual basis?

 

Generally speaking, consider how you treat your home. You may have fine furnishings, ornate architecture or highly decorative surfaces. One needs only to remember that all things suffer wear, and are subject to age.

 

Specifically, anything which is maintained regularly and by using consistent methods will stand the test of time longer. And, of course, more attention means more expenditure.

 

Are you willing and able, including budget-wise, to do what is required to sustain the look of refinement? If not, a room or property can easily become a dereliction of one’s duties.

 

Methods for maintaining that new and improved renovation:

 

* Clean all surfaces regularly to prevent dirt build up.

 

* Install automated room deodorizer. Some are designed with portability in mind.

 

* Apply a liquid polish to all clear finished wood surfaces including moldings, doors and

furniture.

 

* Touch up paint on surfaces using a small brush or touch up roller. Keep the touch-up

areas as small as possible.

 

* Repair damage to a surface using a method that will best duplicate or match the existing

surface. Great detail should be paid to surfaces which require a precise match.

Example: Stippled surfaces, reflective surfaces, textured surface, and surfaces with a

noticeable sheen.

 

* Keep decorative surfaces clean, and unexposed to the UV rays of the sun. This is essential

for maximizing the longevity of the surface’s good condition.

 

* Apply a clear coat application, for the ultimate in painted surface protection. It has been

proven to add years of service to hotel surfaces.

 

* Replace anything which cannot be repaired in a reasonable amount of time and effort.

This is the final resort, and the most expensive.

Example: A broken armrest on a chair may be repairable. But will it look as though it was

not?

 

A restoration takes a great deal of time to complete. There are steps and procedures involved. If ignored, they will show up in the results as carelessness, or a willingness to cut corners where you shouldn’t have.

 

The same dedication should be given to maintaining what was created initially. For, if it is not, in a very short time, the hotel’s reputation and reliability could suffer – and become questionable.

 

And, I don’t need to tell any of you what that means!

 

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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