Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

Archive for the ‘Texturing’ Category

Four Unusual Guest Rooms in Un-ordinary Locations

1. FOCAL POINT: Red iridescent 1967 Mustang life-size mural. Air-brushed and hand-painted on 42-foot north wall.

Lodging type: Private inn with 8 bedrooms and 5 bathrooms.
Structure: Former Amish farm house.
Location: Northeast Indiana.
Room’s description: Third floor attic suite. Dimensions: 24-feet wide by 42 feet long.
Light source: Two dormers on front and back sides, one on each end.
Floor: Smooth-planed, tongue and groove hardwood. Note: more than 130 years old.
Walls: Drywall. Finish: White Snowfall, Color No. SW 6000 semi-gloss latex.
Ceiling: Drywall. Finish: Two layers of clear faux glaze over white flat base coat.
Paint products manufacturers: Sherwin-Williams; also Liquitex Acrylic Artist Paints.

2. FOCAL POINT: Panoramic re-creation of rare books reading room in Newberry Collectors Library, Chicago. Custom wallpaper mural wraps around 32-feet north and 22-feet east walls.

Lodging type: Hostel catering to travelers ages 60 and over; 8 bedrooms, each sleeping 7-8.
Structure: Abandoned industrial warehouse.
Location: West side of Chicago.
Room’s description: Second floor. Dimensions: 32-feet by 22-feet.
Light sources: 4 large, 18-paned steel-framed swing-hinged windows.
Floors: Wall-to-wall commercial grade carpeting over hardwood. Pattern: Salt-n-Pepper-neutrals.
Walls: 3 – Bare concrete block, smooth floated. Finish: Stain: Softer Tan, Color no. SW 6141.
Mural wall: Drywall installed, then white latex base coat rolled on two weeks before mural hung.
Ceiling: Dropped 18-inch frosted tiles, grid frames.
Furniture: Twin-sized bed foundations made from shortened oblong library tables; small reading tables became bedside/night stands.
Paint products manufacturer: H&C/S-W (concrete block walls); Drywall base coat.

Personal note: At age twelve, I visited the Newberry Library for the first time. Six years younger than the required minimum age of eighteen. I filled out a form requesting a book to read, I was seated at a table. A library concierge brought the volume, and placed it on a small table-top easel in front of me. She showed me how to turn the pages by using a special wand with felt tips. Note: All works had to be read there.

3. FOCAL POINT: Two Brown bear cubs in Wisconsin north woods scene. Life-size mural covers 24-feet long wall.

Lodging Type: Extended-stay family motel, that accommodates traumatic brain injured children.
Structure: Former two-story elementary school.
Location: North Appalachian Mountains.
Room description: First floor. Dimensions: 24-feet by 32-feet, part of 3-room suite plus bath.
Light source: Skylights.
Floors: Wall-to-wall commercial carpeting. Pattern: Houndstooth. Colors: Med-to-forest greens.
Walls: Smooth-floated plaster. Three walls painted Emerald Line: Cotton White, Color no: SW 7104, tinted with Byte Blue, Color no. SW 6498.
Ceilings: Dropped white pearl frosted acoustical tile squares set into flat white grid frames.
Paint product manufacturers: Sherwin-Williams; Liquitex Acrylic Artist Paints.

The Process: I installed the custom woodland mural onto the 18-feet by 32-feet wall facing south. Then I hand-painted and air-brushed both cubs into the foreground, using the designer’s template. By the way, the woods scene was a reproduction of a photo taken by the property owner. He was a freelance nature photographer for The National Geographic Society.

4. FOCAL POINT: View from the top of Jack’s Beanstalk. Hand and air-brush painted.

Lodging type: City inn.
Structure: Former 23-room luxury apartment.
Location: West Central Park, New York City
Room Dimensions: 15-feet by 26 feet
Light source: 2 tall adjacent windows overlooking the park.
Walls: Drywall. Painted white semi-gloss latex base coat; then two layers of faux stippling glaze: 1 part White Mint, color no: SW 6441, 3 parts Cotton White, color no. SW 7104, semi-gloss latex.
Ceilings: Popcorn texture, pin-dot effect. Paint: Cotton White, color no. SW 7104.
Paint products manufacturers: Behr’s; Grumbacher Acrylic Artist Paints.

The Process: A graphic designer sketched the Jack’s Beanstalk design on paper first. Then, a projector shot the image onto the wall. The same designer used colored chalk pencils to “trace” that image. Next, she used an air-brush spray system to paint the design. The painted mural was allowed to dry and settle for two days. Last, the artist sprayed on a fine coat of clear glaze mist.
THE EFFECT: Like looking through the clouds.
Paint products manufacturers: Glidden’s; Liquitex Low-Gloss acrylics.

Most painters and decorators envision the unusual and unique projects they’d like to have a hand in creating.

A Few Tips for Getting Started in Design-Mural Painting

1. Explore these outlets during your off days, and hours.
2. Decide which type of creative project really interests you.
3. Practice the special techniques required. If you can afford it, take a high-rated class at your local art school. Opt for a professional artist-instructor. Check out background, credits, awards.
4. Study recognized designers-muralists. Their backgrounds, styles, methods, paint selections.
5. To start out, you may want to work under an experienced creative painter/artist on one of his or her projects. Recommended: Help on your off time. Keep the day job.
6. When ready to “solo,” work on these special projects on the side. Start with simpler designs.
7. Leave your regular painting job behind only if and when you have a solid potential client and project base established. And, if and when you want to make that career change.

My view: Hand-painted murals are a gift to the surface… the atmosphere… the viewer!

****************
Thanks for being here on this planet. And, thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Advertisements

Painter’s World: Painting Unusual Projects

What are the most unusual paint projects that you’ve ever done?

 

10 Unusual Paint Projects Worked on By Other Painters

 

  1. Exterior and interior of Doberman’s custom dog house
  2. Tennis equipment storage of retired athlete
  3. Children’s-sized 3-room playhouse
  4. Garage interior room for small antique tool collection
  5. Miniature apartment interior for training city dogs “how to live in an apartment”
  6. Built-in notions and supplies closets for professional designer and seamstress
  7. Huge storage closet for tech geek
  8. Children’s 2-level treehouse
  9. Agri-seed museum
  10. School’s double flagpole and connecting platform

 

10 Unusual Paint Projects that I have Worked On

 

  1. Sandblasting and spraying vinyl coating on structural steel frame for train scale
  2. Painted geometric graphics in fluorescent colors in day care center
  3. Applied genuine grasscloth wallcovering to entire room – ceiling, walls, doors
  4. Painted piping and talk system that was being shipped to China
  5. Sandblasted and painted semi-tractor wrecker
  6. Stained woodwork for molded panel ceiling
  7. Painted church dome with Metallic Gold
  8. Sandblasted and epoxy-painted Olympic-sized swimming pool
  9. Applied foil wallpaper to large ceiling
  10. Brush and rolled steel tub frames for Wild West display

 

Probably, my father’s most unusual painting project was the interior of an underground bomb shelter. In particular, he painted the vertical wood panels inserted into the walls of the pre-cast 12-feet by 18 feet vault thick steel shell. The agri-businessman’s wife refused to even step in the security structure unless it “looked inviting and homey.”

 

Unusual painting projects tend to stretch our creativity, agility and patience. They also give us the opportunity to have lots of fun. To use colors in exciting, unexpected ways. To reach into our greater selves as craftspersons and artisans.

 

*******************************************************************************

Unusual painting projects can open the door to new, specialty career opportunities.

*******************************************************************************

Thank you for including “Painting with Bob” in your busy day.

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting Them: Food Courts and Snack Bars

A commercial food facility, above all things, must serve food and beverages that are widely known, and appeal to the diverse tastes of the public.

 

What type of atmosphere works best to stimulate that hunger for food, or thirst for a beverage?

 

Do you have an established theme? The 50s décor with its juke box, vinyl-cushioned booths and roller skating servers, was a popular style in its day. A well-established theme will keep the patrons, guests, and visitors interested. Coming back for more! And, create a great place for conversation and socialization.

 

Most food courts, whether at a hotel or a mall, are designed for guest comfort. The design should correspond with the surrounding décor. It should incorporate some of the same elements in décor, color, textures, tone, etc. And, all elements used should stimulate the appetite.

 

“Spaces” within the food court: Eating/drinking, socializing, studying, resting.

Special construction elements: Solid woods, steels, metals, laminates; glass, heavy plastic; slip-proof flooring; one level, no steps.

Special features: High traffic, specialty clusters in bigger space, opps. for lots of mingling.

Special needs: Smooth surfaces and corners; no residual fumes/odors; pleasing aesthetically; high durability; easy cleaning and sanitizing; obstruction-free traffic areas;

Exposure: Water, cleaning agents, grease, high heat, etc.

Design elements: Graphics, stripes, geometrics; inlay pieces; food-inspired paintings/murals; original paintings; illustrations.

Color schemes: Bright accents; subtle touches. Inviting, and conducive to dining. Welcoming! Uplifting, cheerful, and relaxing. Also, great for conversation, reading, listening to music.

 

Bring life to your food service area. Here’s how!

 

1. Utilize scenic paintings or photos related to leisure and travel. People love to envision themselves there.

TIP: Hang printed and enlarged photos of enticing scenes on the hotel property. Flowers, plants, brook, fountain, rest area, etc. Hang small paintings found/donated by staff members.

 

2. Paint wall graphics to increase the element of creativity, and to reduce blank wall space.

HINT: An original wall graphics was hung on the walls of two adjoining restaurants, and corridor that connected them. It was the creation of a local paperhanger/patron.

 

3. Vary wood tone colors used on tables and chairs.

TIP: Tables in light oak with laminate, tile, or block tops, chairs in dark oak or even painted.

 

4. Use track and neon lighting with various combinations of colored lights to create mood appropriate for area’s theme. Examples: Friendly, business-like, folksy, formal, romantic.

TIP: The right lighting also enhances the appearance and appeal of the food and beverages. And, the entire area!

 

5. Heavy-textured vinyl wall covering adds to the atmospheric mood.

TIP: Commercial-grade wallcoverings clean well. They’re very durable. They retain color and finish/texture longer.

 
6. Surrounding guests with a sense of memorabilia tends to instill sentimentality and comfort.

HINT: Old kitchen utensils and cooking pots, laundry aids, photos, tools, small implements, etc. lined the walls of The Wagon Wheel in Merrillville, Indiana. Eating there was like eating at a grandparent’s circa 1800s kitchen table.

 
7. Convey a sense of realism by using a system of murals.

TIP: Continuous murals are fun. Example: A walking trail, or farmer’s market, or big garden.

 
8. Refer to the “psychology of colors” to see what colors stimulate an appetite best.

TIPS: Red – Hot foods, romantic drinks; Blue – Cool foods, relaxing drinks; Green – Nature.

 

Above all, you want the food court and/or snack bar to make every patron feel comfortable, and unrushed. Totally welcome there!

 

It’s all about atmosphere. The service. And, definitely, the food, beverages and snacks.

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

“Food without atmosphere is like tacos without spice.” Rdh

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

 

Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.” Copyright 2015.  Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Painting It: The Dresser!

You probably see your dresser every morning. “What am I going to wear?”

 

Does it appeal to you as much as the items in it? Or, does it leave a dull impression every time you are around it? Or think about it?

 

Over a course of years, your dresser may have lost its allure also. This can be fixed easily.

 

By washing, sanding and painting, your worn out-looking dresser can appear like new. Spend a few dollars. Apply a lot of elbow grease. And, it can become a major attraction in your home.

 

Follow these steps. And, you’ll be on your way.

 

1. Find a place you can work.

A. Select a place with good ventilation.

B. Lay a drop cloth or some plastic sheeting on the floor.

C. Place your dresser on top.

D. Also, place blocks of wood underneath, so the piece doesn’t rest directly on the floor.

 

2. Take a screwdriver and remove all hardware – eg. handles and knobs.

A. Wood: Clean gently with mild soap and warm water.

B. Metal: Clean gently with mild soap or baking soda and warm water. Polish with metal polish.

C. Brass: Clean gently with mild soap or baking soda and warm water. Polish with brass polish.

 

3. Wash the surfaces of the dresser.

A. Use a sponge, cleaning brushes, and a suitable detergent.

B. Pay special attention to drawer edges, molding and crevices on drawer faces.

C. Rinse with warm water.

D. Let air dry; or force dry with heat gun or hair dryer.

 

4. Sand entire surface.

A. Use #220 sand paper or sanding block.

B. Fill imperfections with wood filler.

C. Let dry.

D. Then, sand smooth.

 

5. Wipe the entire surface down.

A. Use a tack cloth to remove any dust residue.

 

6. Apply a thin coating of primer to the whole surface.

A. Use a brush, and a low nap roller cover, three-sixteenth.

B. Or apply by spray painting.

C. Using spray cans may render a very fine job – whether you’re a painter or consumer.

D. Conventional spray or HVLP equipment is recommended, and generally used, by professional painters. Consumers that do a lot of painting, including furniture refinishing, also rely on spray equipment to get the job done.

 

7. Lightly sand surface once more, when the primer has dried thoroughly.

A. Use #220 sandpaper or #400 wet sand until surface is smooth.

B. Wipe down with tack cloth.

 

8. Apply the finish (top) coat using same method as in step 6.

A. A hard enamel or oil finish is desired.

B. I have found that an automotive grade acrylic enamel works quite well, also.

Note: It is highly durable and has superior color retention and wash ability. It does cost a little more than conventional paint.

 

9. Let the dresser’s new finish dry completely. A full 24 hours is ideal.

 

10. Re-install your hardware. Slide in the drawers and you’re all set.

A. Your dresser will look as good as your clothes inside it.

B. New-style tip: Change the hardware: Hinges, knobs, drawer pulls, etc.

 

A THINK TWICE TIP: Is your dresser an antique? 

  1. Carefully and gently clean with a soft cloth.
  2. Repair only the necessary parts of it.
  3. Gently rub linseed oil into all wood surfaces. Apply with the grain.
  4. Do not paint unless the piece has lost all of its value.
  5. CAREFUL! Most antique pieces of furniture maintain, even increase, in worth because of their signs of age, and their imperfections.

 

Want to perfect your skills even more? Or, do you want to try a similar creative project?

Maybe, your child’s dresser needs a facelift, too.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

DRESS YOUR DRESSER FOR SUCCESS!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Have a great day!  And, thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: How to Apply a Custom Texture

A texture can be applied anywhere that paint can. However, the skills and techniques needed much more specialized.

 

“Texture” refers to a surface profile, which is “other than smooth.” That means there are literally thousands of variations that can be achieved. And part of that variation is a vast number of products and methods, available for obtaining the desired results.

 

FIRST STEP.

 

Decide what type of custom design and/or consistency you would like your surface to have.

 

A short list of custom finishes and the materials used with them:

 

  1. Venetian Plaster – plaster mix, joint compound.

 

  1. Crows foot – joint compound, premixed drywall compound.

 

  1. Random Trowel – joint compound, plaster mix, premixed drywall compound.

 

  1.  Impasto – premixed drywall compound, plaster mix, modeling paste.

 

  1. Crossed Weave – premixed drywall compound, joint compound.

 

In selecting the “Random Trowel method,” a certain basic procedure needs to be followed in order to achieve the desired effect.

 

SECOND STEP.

 

Make sure the surface you have chosen is generally smooth, dry and porous. (The compound will adhere well). I do not recommend texturing a surface that has a sheen greater than eggshell.

 

In texturing a surface, which has a gloss, the surface will normally end up with popping and loosening of the texture. I wouldn’t go that route. To begin with skimming a ceiling using a broad knife and joint compound is an excellent way of creating uniformity.

 

THIRD STEP.

 

Mix the compound to the desired thickness. And make a sample board. Assemble an assortment of drywall broad knives 6-to-14 inches.

 

Mix approximately ½ gallon, in which the compound is medium to heavy bodied. If the compound sticks to a broad knife held upside down, and doesn’t fall off, that’s a little too thick.

 

Experiment. Test different mixtures till you are satisfied with the consistency.

 

To make a sample board.

 

Use a 1-foot by 1-foot, or 2-foot by 2-foot pressed wood sheet. Experiment with applying the texture in different ways.

 

Try to “establish a pattern.” If you don’t like the result, scrape off the board. Give it another try. This is just practice for applying the real thing.

 

A person must get familiar with holding the broad knife and manipulating the compound. It’s the best way to create a texture you will be happy with in the end.

 

STEP FOUR.

 

Having established a technique, you should be able to apply the Random Trowel Method.

 

Select the appropriate knife. Have about one-half gallon of the compound mixed and ready.

 

Begin in the farthest corner of the surface area. If it is a wall, start in the upper left-hand corner. If it’s a ceiling, start at the far left corner. Work yourself out from there.

 

Place compound on the knife. Spread it out. Use a motion which places heavier pressure on the knife. Then, gradually release that pressure. This will create a texture with a rise or slope, similar to that of a wave.

 

THE KEY:

 

Now, overlap the motions with your broad knife, so that the sloping texture is not heading in one direction. Optimally, you’re shooting for a randomized pattern with high and low areas. You want to create a varied degree of ridges. Some will be sharper; others will be smoother.

 

Remember: The finish is not permanent, as long as it has not hardened. Wipe it off. And start again, if you need to do so.

 

A texture is an extension of creativity, especially when decorating living and working spaces.

 

Are you interested in textured surfaces, and their unique appearance? Then, consider all of the variations available.

 

Also, there are some amazing artisans out there. Engage one that can design something for you beyond your imagination. All that you might be left to do is choose a color.

 

TRENDY TIPS:

 

1. Combine different textures, using the same palette color.

2. Apply one layer/design very smooth, the other nubby, or ridged.

3. Try overlays. Apply the same texture and palette color; one layer horizontal, the other vertical.

4. Simulate fur, velvet or leather. Bark or cork.

 

The possibilities are endless.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

See you at the paint store! Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Tag Cloud