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Archive for the ‘Properties’ Category

Surviving a Hotel or Hospital Property Sale

The rumor mill has been grinding out “guess whats” for weeks. The “hotel” or “hospital” where you work is up for sale.

 

The order comes down, straight from the top.6uT

 

‘Be on your best behavior.”  “Keep this place running smoothly.”  “Keep your mouth shut.”

“You never know who might be watching – or standing in front of you.”

 

“Don’t blow it!”

 

Then you hear that the strangers walking around are prospective buyers.

 

“Keep on your toes. Stay alert.”

 

For weeks… months, the staff sees a steady stream of serious buyers canvassing the property.

“Be extra courteous and hospitable,” management team tells everyone.

 

The stream of prospects reduces to a trickle. It might even stop altogether. Or so it seems.

 

Then the big guys show up. With their cameras, webcams, custom-apped smartphones, tape measures, calculators, etc. It appears that they’re walking around every foot of the place. Staff spots them everywhere. Even in secured, private areas.

 

Things quiet down again. You see a handful of the same people moving around the property. Checking things out very carefully, several times. The rumor mill shuts down.

 

Word leaks out: The property has been sold. The G.M. confirms it. An announcement to all staff includes the name or names of the new owner/owners, and their take-over date.

 

All this while you’ve needed to get your work done.

A lull hits the entire organization. An eerie type of mourning engulfs the place. A very brief time is allowed for everyone to accept the news.

 

The transition work begins for everyone.

 

You – and probably everyone else on staff – start asking the same questions:

 

  1. What are the new company’s policies and rules?
  2. What are the new company’s practices that every staff member is expected to follow, effective immediately?
  3. What are the new company’s policies, rules and practices specifically aimed at your department? For your job as “Painter”?
  4. What kind of help will be available if you run into any problem trying to work under the new system?
  5. How long do you get to make the transition?
  6. Is your job at risk? How long do you have?

 

Usually, change takes place very quickly, when a hotel or hospital property is sold.

 

They “clean house” thoroughly. Bodies are moved out at sometimes a shockingly fast speed. And, heads roll.

 

The chain of command may change. Management may change drastically.

 

For those staff members left, job descriptions change and switch. Work shifts and schedules may change. Pay scales, dress codes and benefit packages will probably change.

 

New owners, new managers, new game.

 

Surviving the sale many not be your call. Surviving may, or may not, be what you think.

 

 A few tips for surviving the sale of your workplace

 

  1. Promptly start getting ready for whatever may be coming down, at the first hint of a possible change of hands.
  2. “Keep your nose clean,” as my father once advised.
  3. “Zip your lip,” as my grandfather used to say.
  4. “Prepare for every possible scenario that may affect you,” as I’m suggesting via this blog.

 

Final note: Some property sales move silently and swiftly. No signs. No rumors. No strange visitors milling around. No news!
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Surviving the sale of your work property comes down to your self-preservation skills, and attitude.

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Thanks for following “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s View: Covering Up Toxic Mold Infestation

In Florida, more than a few hotels have redecorated all or most of their guest rooms and public areas to cover up a deeper problem. Example: Black mold infestation – Stachybotyry’s chartarum.

 

They’ve spent a lot of money to install new carpeting and tile, furniture and fixtures, window treatments and textiles, AC window units, fresh coats of paint, etc.

 

But none of it will eradicate “sick building syndrome,” the underlying challenge.

 

Black mold and mildew behind the walls, above the ceilings, inside pipes and duct work, under floors, behind cabinetry, etc.

 

To get rid of “sick building” conditions – specifically toxic black mold, the structure’s interior must be gutted. The drywall in all infested rooms and areas must be removed. Plumbing and piping must be torn out. Wall, ceiling and floor joists must be taken out.

 

The entire area must be mitigated and remediated. Aired out, dried completely, and treated for hazardous chemicals and toxins.

 

Painters cannot do this. It’s a job for the professionals in toxic and hazardous materials handling. It is a big job. A labor-intensive job. A dangerous job.

 

Take note: If the actual infested surfaces and elements are not removed. Painters, and other staff members, working in redecorated guest rooms and public areas will still be exposed to the dangerous toxins.

 

Eventually, because the climatic conditions do not self-correct nor reverse themselves, the harmful fungal infestations will work their way into the new drywall, carpeting, textiles and fabrics, piping/plumbing, ductwork and ventilation system, etc. Little-by-little, or alarmingly fast!

 

Then, the toxic black mold fungi will show its ugly face all over again.

 

That’s one reason why, on the national news, you will see big piles of torn drywall inside and outside of houses and commercial buildings damaged by floods, hurricanes, etc. That’s why you’ll see entire houses gutted, and fully exposed wall joists and ceiling frames.

 

Painters must use great caution if they must continue to work in rooms and buildings that have been redecorated, but still harbor the toxic black fungi.

 

MY ADVICE FROM PERSONAL EXPERIENCE

 

Every time you work in or near one of those areas, protect yourself. Still hidden somewhere is the same toxic fungi and infestation that you may have been responsible, previously, for treating.

 

  1. SUIT UP! Head-to-toe in a disposable plastic uniform and shoe covers (like surgeons wear).
  2. Wear disposable gloves with a wide, snug wristband, or that reach mid-forearm.
  3. Wear a hat.
  4. Wear a nose and mouth mask.
  5. Better yet: Use a free-standing breathing apparatus.
  6. Wear eye goggles that fit snugly.

 

Repeated, or prolonged, exposure to toxic black mold fungi should be avoided. The price that your body might have to pay tends to be much higher than you could have anticipated.

 

Most of you can’t afford – and don’t want – to skip around from workplace to workplace. And, in Florida, as well as other parts of the country, it’s hard to find a hotel property that does not have some kind of environmental problem.

 

So, please! Do whatever you can.  NO! Do whatever it takes – to protect yourself from the effects of toxic Black mold fungi infestation.

 

It’s a life-threatening and traumatic tragedy. Trust me!  The EPA, environmental experts and medical specialists can tell you all about it.

 

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The life you save from permanent damage by toxic black mold exposure could be your own!

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved

Painter’s World: Lars, Luxury Home Painter – Chicago Style

Lars lives in a 3-story walk-up (no elevator) apartment building off West Grand Boulevard, in northwest Chicago. He paints and also installs wallpapers in luxury “owner” apartments and condominiums on the in the North Shore and northeast side neighborhoods overlooking Lake Michigan.

 

On the average, he works on the same residence for seven to eight full days at a time. When one of the properties is sold, he is usually the first painter that the new owners contact to redecorate the home to their specifications.

 

These redecorating projects fall into three levels of work.

 

1. Minimal redecorating. Repainting one or two rooms (often the living room and master bedroom); touching up painting throughout the home. Owner involvement: Owner/client is minimally involved during the work. Approximate completion time: 1 to 3 days.

 

2. Some redecorating. New painting often needs to encorporate new owner’s color preferences into existing color scheme. Requires repainting of front hallway; main living, dining and entertainment areas, bedrooms and bathrooms. Owner involvement: Owner checks in on project fairly regularly. Approximate completion time: 7 to 10 days.

 

3. Remodeling & redecorating. He works under project contractor, based on the architect’s and interior designer’s plans. Entails extensive surface prepping, following new color scheme and applying paint, special finishes and wallcoverings, also detail work. Owner involvement: Very little directly with painter and other craftspersons. Approximate completion time: 1 to 6 months.

 

PROJECT COSTS:

 

NOTE: Labor costs for Level one and two are figured at a materials plus hourly labor rate. Level three are figured on a three-part project basis: (1) materials, supplies; (2) repairs and prep work; and (3) finish work.

 

1. Projects-Level one. Materials and supplies: Lars asks the owner to pay out front for all. Or, the owner gives him a cashier’s check or money order to purchase what he needs. Labor: Owner pays one-half out front, and one-half at completion.

 

2. Projects-Level two. Property owner and Lars sign 2-page agreement, which includes the approximate itemized cost for project. Materials, supplies, equipment rental: Property owner pays Lars out front. Labor: Owner pays one-third before work begins, one-third half-way through project, one-third upon inspection and completion.

 

3. Projects-Level three. Lars signs contract agreement with project contractor, that bonds Lars. Materials and supplies, special tools, equipment rental: Lars receives debit card or access to special checking account, and purchases everything he needs out front and as needed.

Labor: Lars, like all tradespersons on project, receives “project employee” pay check on bi-weekly basis. Craftsman bonus: Upon completion and final inspections, Lars receives a bonus check, if his work is rated at A or A-plus level. That means premium craftsmanship, coming in before his deadline, and under painting and decorating budget.

 

NOTE: Lars’s bonuses are never based on the productivity level of other tradespersons on the project. They do, however, take into account the quality of the finished work of everyone on the project. Thus, Lars and the different tradespersons have an added incentive to work together, consistently, toward achieving high-end results!

 

By the way, Lars worked as an IUPAT/IBPAT painter for over fourteen years. He moved, got caught in the union’s new vested hours rule determination, and lost all fourteen years of his vested worked hours toward pension.

 

So, in late 2002, he struck out on his own. He became a one-man paintshop. Plus, he farms himself out on larger projects.

 

He says that he has never regretted the switch. “During rough times, I’ve had to take on temporary staff painting jobs with hotels and resorts… Also, I’ve worked for a non-union contractor on and off, installing wallcoverings.”

 

With a Dutch twinkle in his eyes, he adds, “I do what all professional painters do. What is necessary…what makes sense.”

 

Right you are, Lars.

 

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CONGRATULATIONS and a big “thank you” to our Chicago Cubs for  winning the 2017 World Series. We’re all very proud of you.

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

14 Favors to Do for Your Replacement

You’re leaving the painter’s job at the hotel or facility. A new painter will be taking over.

Your aim should always be to leave the “Painter’s Post,” Paintshop,” and all related support systems in top shape for your successor.

 

You can play a key role in the new painter’s ability to start on the right foot. He or she needs and deserves:

(a) to be welcomed warmly by your former “family” – teammates and managers;

(b) to adjust well to his or her new workplace, system, and company policies;

(c) to learn to do the job needed and expected, and,

(d) to reach the confidence level needed to be a vital, valuable member of that “community.”

 

You want to do everything that you can – during your last week or two there – to ensure that he or she will be glad about accepting the job.

 
1. Leave him or her a list or chart about the following: (a) standard tasks, (b) usual work orders, (c) current projects, (d) departmental troubleshooting projects, (d) projects on the agenda, and, (e) projects on hold because of budgetary/management constraints.

 

2. Leave an up-to-date list of products, materials and supplies that (a) have been ordered for necessary, basic use; (b) have been requisitioned but put on hold; (c) were requisitioned but turned down; (d) need to be ordered for current projects; and (e) need to be requisitioned for upcoming projects.

 

3. Leave a list of little “inside” job secrets, and handy-to-know things.

 

4. Encourage your department teammates, fellow staff members and supervisor(s) to treat the new guy right! To include him or her in their lunch groups. And, to cut him or her some slack.

 

5. Finish as many uncompleted orders and small-to-mid sized projects as you can. Note: You may need to prioritize a bit.

 

6. Prepare and leave a simple guide that correlates with the company’s “Painter” job description.

 

7. Update the Paintshop inventory list. And, leave it in an easy-to-see place.

 

8. Sort, organize and shelve – in a handy spot – all manuals, MSDSs, spec sheets, guides, tutorials, videos, tapes, etc.

 

9. Clear out, clean up and straighten up the Paintshop.

 

10. Clearly label, then organize and properly store all product containers.

 

11. Leave all essential tools and equipment in good-to-go working order. Well, the best that you can do. Note: Thoroughly clean all painting and finishing tools and equipment used regularly.

 

12. Clean, launder, fold, and store all dropcloths; reusable “suit-ups,” hats/caps, work gloves, etc.

 

13. Clean out, vacuum, wash, and wax the “Painter’s Golf Cart.”

– Put air in the tires. Fully charge the battery(ies). Clean the windshield, and fill the wiper fluid reservoir. If gas-operated, fill up the tank the last day you’re there.

 

14. Leave your desk, computer, mobile devices, and related spaces ready for the new person. TIP – LAST DAY: Before you clock out, delete your user/access name, password, security/I.D., number, plus all personnel, personal, and other information.

 

BONUS: If supervisors and management approve, offer to be available to the new painter for questions – on a limited basis. Until he or she gets settled and learns the ropes. TIP: Especially helpful if you were there more than five years.

BONUS: To the best of your ability, leave the “Painter” name/title in real good shape there.

BONUS: Leave behind a good – make that great – “Paintshop” reputation.

SUPER BONUS: If appropriate, leave a “Best Wishes” or “Good Luck” card for the new painter. Keep it light, and very brief.

 

AFTER YOU LEAVE: Stay away from the business, and off of the property. For one full year, at least. Exceptions: You need to pick up or drop off something. You’re applying for a job opening. You’ve been invited there for a specific, appropriate reason. TIP: Go straight to the designated area. Do not pass “GO.”

 

Give the new painter a good chance to get settled, find his or her way around, make friends, gain support, and succeed!

 

You want the new painter to be glad that he or she is there. A part of the engineering/facility services team. And, a part of the organization!

 

You have the power! The new painter’s success may depend on how you leave things there. (Realizing that some things tend to be out of your control.)

You can leave behind a shining – and lasting – example of integrity, honesty, fair play, respect, friendship, and, professionalism.

A legacy that the new painter can build upon, to succeed in his or her own way.

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A painter’s most trusted friend can be the painter that he or she is replacing.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting Patterns: Giant Chessboard – Part I

 

Last October, two painters took on a project that they had no business tackling. One, they had less than one year experience in the trade. Two, they were production painters. And, three, they were not detail-oriented.

 

Project: Paint continuous pattern on exterior driveway and courtyard, and interior main hallway.

Dimensions: Driveway: 36 feet wide by 350 feet long; Courtyard: 18 feet wide by 24 feet long. Hallway: 12 feet wide by 220 feet long

 

Pattern/effect: Wood-grain chessboard.

 

Property owner: Amateur chess champion and business entrepreneur.

 

WHAT THE PROJECT REQUIRED

 

  1. Precision measuring: up, down, across.
  2. Precision gridding: linear, horizontal, vertical.
  3. Precision marking: block pattern, no-borders, edge run-offs.
  4. Labeling: Alternating blocks, horizontal and vertical.
  5. Precision cutting in, each paint block.
  6. Prompt, steady fill-in of each block, in gridded order.
  7. Careful matching of correct paint color to correct block.
  8. Frequent paint mixing and stirring: 5-gallon containers; also 1-gallon roller pan filler cans.

 

HOW THE PROJECT GOT MESSED UP

 

  1. Measuring: each surface area’s length and width estimated, not measured; courtyard missed.
  2. Gridding: each area’s axis (center) not located.
  3. Marking: perpendicular lines forming block edges/encasements not marked evenly. Corners not squared. Why: Product failure: Poor quality masking tape failed.
  4. Labeling: Cabernet brown and Sandstone blocks not alternated in certain area. Why: Worker(s) did not pay attention, lost track, got in a hurry.
  5. Cutting in: corners not sharp – not squared/ “L-ed” off. Fuzzy edging. Why: Work speed did not match skill level; wrong brushes used; too much paint on brushes; poor taping. (See C.)
  6. Filling-in: Finish paint surface not smooth. Paint applied unevenly, also too thinly or thickly in spots. Unblended brush stroke edges. Paint-clogged brushes.
  7. Paint-to-block matching: Lost chessboard pattern big time. Note: One block color off messes up entire sequence.
  8. Frequent mixing/stirring to avoid “bumps,” lumps and separation in applied paint. Why: Paint products not strained or filtered before being poured into 1-gallon buckets, paint tray.

 

See: Painting Patterns: Giant Chessboard – Part II.

 

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Champion chess players and devoted decorative painters share a key skill: Patience.

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Estate Properties: Repainting and Redecorating within the Sale Prep Budget

A loved one passes away, and is laid to rest. His or her estate must be settled in a legally acceptable and timely order. The residence – eg. house, townhouse, condo – is a major part of that estate. And, it must be sold.

 

Often, each heir will have a wish list for using his or her share of the monetary proceeds. Each heir expects to get at least a certain amount.

 

The final sale price must be maximized. The property needs to undergo a facelift, before it goes on the market.

 

A Skilled Painter and Decorator’s role

 

A painter, skilled in renovation and restoration – especially of estate properties – can hold the key to realizing a lucrative sale.

 

  1. The painter will be able to accentuate the home’s attributes and advantages.
  2. The painter will be able to upgrade the home’s features to appeal to today’s real estate market.
  3. The painter will be able to camouflage or minimize its flaws – uneven walls, cracked wood.
  4. The painter will be able to suggest or advise the seller(s) about other work to have done, and by whom.

 

The painter can help the estate trustee or administrator work up a total facelift estimate.

Also, the painter/decorator can help determine an itemized budget range for each service that needs to be completed. Prior to listing the property for sale.

 

Painting/decorating tips gleaned from giving an interior facelift to a home prior to listing.

 

Keep the facelift simple. Make it suitable to the home’s architecture, style, worth, and location.

 

  1. TIP: To minimize the pale yellow cast of once white ceilings, custom tint white latex wall a very light yellow-white. This stretches facelift budget that cannot cover repainting of ceilings.

 

  1. TIP: Paint all walls throughout the home the same custom-tinted paint mentioned above. This creates flowing, uniform look.

 

  1. TIP: Repaint the bathrooms in their same original color – in this case soft yellow. This helps contain paint product costs.

 

  1. TIP: Limit repainting in kitchens, breakfast nooks, etc. that often feature tiled wall areas.

 

  1. TIP: Select high-end paint products, known (a) offer better coverage and (b) require only one coat. Especially in older homes, and in certain climates.

 

  1. TIP: Give ample attention to cleaning and prepping all surfaces to be re-finished. Examples: patching, filling, caulking, sanding. Allot enough drying time between steps and applications. Remember: The quality of a finishing job is linked directly to the quality of the surface prepping.

 

  1. TIP: Limit priming to surfaces that really need it. Hint: Areas that will likely stay the same finish color for at least the first year of new ownership.

 

  1. TIP: Apply finish coat to walls, trim, doors, etc. room-by-room. Or, whichever way that will assure ample drying time, a uniform finish throughout, and save in overall labor costs.

 

 

Before you call in a painter. . .

 

Empty the home’s interior to the walls. Here are a few tips to help you.

 

  1. Distribute and remove all personal items. (Follow the terms of the trust and/or will.) This includes all types of items such as furniture, accessories, appliances; china, silver, housewares, cookware; clothing, jewelry; linens, textiles; antiques, collectibles, books, etc.

 

  1. Remove and place remaining valuables in the hands of the best available dealers. Examples: expensive jewelry, art; antiques, collectibles, glass, books.

 

  1. If there’s time, hold a “class act” yard sale for the rest of personal property. Roll out the red carpet bargain-prices. Offer boxed/bagged/packaged group deals. Offer some quality items for free.

 

  1. GOOD NEIGHBOR TIP: If your loved one lived in the neighborhood for years: Invite close neighbors to come and select a few items to keep. No charge.

 

  1. Donate some of the nicer clothing, accessories, linens, etc. to a local church-run thrift shop.

 

  1. Donate whatever is left to the nearest Goodwill Industries, Salvation Army, or similar charity store. Call in advance to make certain they offer pick-up service.

 

Giving a home its final touches of paint and finish – facelift – before its estate sale can be rewarding.

In a way, the painter gets the opportunity to help the family give their loved one’s property a proper send off. And, that may help those left behind find some sense of closure.

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When people know how much you care about them, they care about how much you know.

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Special thanks to supporters through LinkedIn.com and Google+.  See you on the IN-side.

And, thanks, everyone, for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Painting Gardens, Rest Areas and Walking Trails – Part I

Interior and exterior gardens, rest areas and walking paths are valuable amenities of any hotel property. They benefit hotel guests, visitors and staff members. They provide natural or “near-to-nature” settings for:

 

. enjoying quieter moments, meditating, taking in nature;

. taking breaks, eating a snack;

. de-stressing, calming down;

. reading, writing, contemplating, thinking more clearly;

. visiting briefly with a co-worker, or another guest/visitor.

 

Too often, these special havens are not a high priority, when planning and scheduling painting/decorating projects around the hotel property. When identifying and handling maintenance projects. When budgeting – finding the money – to take care of them.

 

The surfaces of these wonderful areas deserve special treatment and attention. How do we keep each of them in good – make that excellent – shape?

 

Tips for decks; roofs, covers, overhangs; rails, fences; seating; and tables. 

 
1. DECKS – Caution: Steps, ramps, rails, banisters, etc.

 

A. Repairs and maintenance: Secure boards, rails, banisters where loose or protruding from surface. Make certain that fasteners (nails, screws, etc.) are recessed below the surface. Check that metal and glass pieces are smooth. Regularly, pressure-clean with bleach solution, to kill and remove mold or fungus.

B. Prepping: Sweep surfaces free of debris. Apply sealer to surfaces.

C. Painting and finishing: Apply appropriate primer formulated for decks. Apply exterior oil stain, solid or semi-transparent. If using paint, apply exterior gloss oil or enamel finishing product.

D. Products, supplies, tools, equipment: Oil stains, enamel, epoxy; brushes, rollers, spray equipment.

E. Challenge: High exposure to sun, rain/moisture, shoes, wheels, sharp objects, things that stain.

Tip: Suggest products with high level of environmental exposure resistance.

 

2. ROOFS/COVERS/OVERHANGS – Caution: Sharp edges, heights, reaching angles.

 

A. Repairs and maintenance: Replace rotting or damaged soffitts and fascia boards. Use galvanized fasteners to reduce corrosion; make certain they are flush with or recessed below the surface.

B. Prepping: Caulk seams, cracks, joints in wood. Properly cover adjacent non-painted areas; tape down edges and corners of covering. Recommend: Plastic sheeting, available in different mill weights.

C. Painting and finishing: Prime wood with exterior oil-based product. Use exterior acrylic latex, oil-based, or solid or semi-transparent oil-based stain.

D. Products, supplies, tools, equipment: Use airless paint sprayer system to apply a uniform paint thickness. Use similar system/equipment to apply stain and finish coating over large area.

E. Challenge: Accessibility. Climbing ladders and positioning to use equipment and to do job safely.

 

3. RAILS and FENCES – Caution: Sharp edges, small spaces, inflexible components.

 

A. Repairs and maintenance: Make certain fasteners are tight, and recessed below the surface. Pressure clean all areas to remove algae, mildew, soil, dirt, dust, etc.

B. Prepping: Sand sharp edges. Use filler to fill in holes, cracks, small crevices. Use exterior primer if using a paint-type system. Cover all nearby surfaces not to be painted; tape down edges and corners.

C. Painting and finishing: Spray paint onto surface, using a conventional or airless spray system.

D. Products, supplies, tools, equipment: Use oil-based solid color, or semi-transparent stain. Or use acrylic exterior latex as a topcoat.

E. Challenge: Try to prevent paint overspray from reaching non-painted surfaces (eg. flowers, trees, bushes, grass); areas finished with another specialty coating (eg. automotive, traffic, recreation); surfaces coated by manufacturer ( eg. playground equipment), etc.

 

4. SEATING.

 

A. Repairs and maintenance: Secure wood structures, so there is limited movement. Make sure that all fasteners are recessed below the surface.

B. Prepping: Sand and wood fill all areas that are not smooth to the touch.


C. Painting and finishing:
Use a hard finish. Wet sand between coats.

D. Products, supplies, tools, equipment: Use medium nap roller cover and frame to apply paint product.

E. Challenge: Try to provide a surface that is safe for contact by skin; also is very durable and washable.

 

5. TABLES – Caution: Super-heavy weight; shape, cumbersome to move/manipulate.

 

A. Repairs and maintenance: Metal – Secure broken welds. Wood – Repair damaged surfaces with filler.

B. Prepping: Metal – Remove rust using sandpaper, wire brush, steel wool, etc. Wood – Sand surface with appropriate abrasive material to achieve preferred smoothness.

C. Painting and finishing: Use a hard finish. For a premium finish, use a HVLP spray system.

D. Products, supplies, tools, equipment: Products – Hard finishing – eg. enamel, urethane, polyurethane, varnishes. Tools – Low-nap roller cover, when applying finish.

E. Challenge: Try to provide superior hard surface that is resistant to chemicals, frequent cleanings, environmental exposure, frequent use, surface abuse and wear, etc.

 

It helps to know a few other facts about each area. Examples:

 

  1. How often area is used: Infrequently, sometimes, often; a heavy traffic area.
  2. When used: Mainly, mornings, afternoons, or evenings; on and off all day; regularly; weekends only.
  3. Who uses the area: Age groups, individuals, families; staff, locals, natives, foreign visitors.
  4. What accommodations it must meet: Blind, hearing/smelling/touching-impaired, wheelchair/walkers.
  5. Why persons are there: Work there; supplier/contractor; vacation; business; conference; area events.
  6. How long area is used: Short-term, extended-stay, long-term, indefinitely.

 

Keeping gardens, rest areas and walking trails in good shape is a daily work-in-progress. It’s a lot of fun. And, it’s fulfilling. Especially later, when you see co-workers, guests, and visitors enjoying them.

 

(See Part II: Fountains; ground borders; flower and plant boxes; bird and animal feeders; other furniture; lighting and light posts; and signage.)

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Gardens are a natural source of energy and rebirth.  rdh

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.” Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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