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Archive for the ‘Rejuvination’ Category

Cocoa Beach Hotel Faces Changes Head On

In March, a hotel GM in Cocoa Beach invited me to stay there for several days. It was the idea of the property management company that had contacted me, way back in 2013, about a position.

 

“Pack a clean set of whites,” had been added at the end of the email. Curious. I did as requested, and headed for the ocean.

 

For the next three days, the hotel’s painter and management company regional director of operations led me around the property. They pointed out surfaces that needed work. They walked me through areas they wanted to improve. They showed me themes and color schemes that the owners wanted to change. And, they made lots of notes on their iPads.

 

The fourth day, we revisited some of those areas. Then, we sat at a small shaded table, and went over the men’s notes. By that time, typed into a hard copy for each of us.

 

Usually, that’s when “the best laid plan hits the fan” (my paraphrase). What the budget can bear differs a lot from the combined needs and wish lists. And, available time and manpower.

 

Not in this case. Everyone at the decision table has been motivated – and ready to move.

 

For example: Here’s what has happened within the last month and a half.

 

  1. A local general contractor was hired to repair and upgrade guest rooms and suites, two restaurants, game room, health club, children’s playground, and part of the conference center.

 

  1. A specialty contractor has signed on to remodel the main kitchen, and public restrooms.

 

  1. The GM has been authorized to add three people to the engineering staff for two full years.

All three will start work August 01, 2017. Each will handle specific aspects of the property upgrade.

 

  1. Grounds-landscaping specialist – Redesign and re-landscape the front entrance, nature sanctuary, rest, and walkway areas.
  2. HVAC and OSHA specialist – Handle vent system cleaning, filter installation, room thermostat replacements, bathroom fan/ventilation system cleaning and repairs.
  3. Painter – Prepping and repainting all areas designated on the improvement list.

 

Each of the three new engineering employees worked previously at, or on, the hotel property.

 

Each is a certified specialist in his or her trade.

 

Each is proficient in English and Spanish. One also speaks and writes Portuguese and Mandarin Chinese.

 

Each is related to a current hotel staff member.

 

Few engineering departments are able to gain three additional workers at once. Fewer have the luxury to employ three specialists at once.

 

It is done more readily in other parts of the U. S. It can be done when both the hotel management and owners are operating on the same wave length. At the same time.

 

An exciting thing to see in action – to be a part of – when it happens.

 

 

“Together… making a place for the human spirit to find ease, if only for one night’s stay…”

 From: Somewhere Safe with Somebody Good, by Jan Karon. Copyright 2015.

 

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As always! Many thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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Painting Them: Restoring and Reviving Hotels

Every staff member saw the hotel “looking better than it had in years.” “Since it had been built,” said a longtime employee.

 

What does it take to restore a hotel?

 

  1. A solid yet flexible plan, highly-skilled craft persons, time, and a large budget.
  2. Usually more resources than many property owners have, or want to commit.

 

What needs to be done to revive a hotel property?

 

As much as the budget will allow.

 

REVIVING A HOTEL

 

Tips from a painter that’s been there, done that. On more than seven hotel properties.

 

1. Start with the most obvious areas – noticeable to the guests and visitors.

A. Guest rooms

B. Lobby(ies)

 

Clean all areas. Touch up paint. Or “full-paint” areas to create a fresh look. A change of color, or design and placement, can be uplifting. A big benefit.

 

2. Cover the essentials.

A. Safety zones

B. High-traffic areas

C. Pools and spas – especially in hotter, humid and sunny climates

 

3. Repair – take care of – the most neglected areas.

A. High-wear areas may require weekly attention.

B. Always post “WET PAINT” signs when painting in high-traffic areas.

C. Look for permanent repair solutions for areas that receive repetitious damage or wear.

Example: Place plastic guards over corners in high-traffic areas such as a lobby.

 

4. “Clean up all of those old messes, the best you can.”

A. Cover anything that is not to be painted, located close to the work area.

B. A final vacuum of the area completes the job.

 

5. Revitalize the higher ticket areas. Get them “back on the market.”

A. Conference centers

B. Restaurants

C. Food courts

D. Gift Shops

 

6. Liven up the most popular spots.

A. Game rooms

B. WI-FI and VIRTUAL SPOTS

C. Children’s playground and activity areas

D. Outdoor recreation areas

E. Social areas

 

7. Remember key operations areas.

A. Housekeeping and Laundry

B. Physical Plant– electrical, mechanical, plumbing systems

C. Engineering and Maintenance

 

Non-guest related areas are often neglected. Yet, they and its workers are vital and valuable.

Use a variety of colors and/or graphics paint to accentuate areas that receive less attention.

It increases morale. It maintains a clean, pleasant work environment. It adds a spot of creativity.

 

Painting unfinished floors can benefit the facility’s operations areas in value-adding ways.

Painting the walls and floor accentuates the importance of the area, and persons that work there.

Painting these areas inspires anyone that works there, or passes through, to take care of the spaces, to keep them clean, and to maintain them. Even when the areas are in use 24/7.

 

Some deciding factors in every category:

 

  1. Urgency
  2. Necessity
  3. Relativity to business’s major market(s), focus and mission
  4. Owners’ and shareholders’ preferences and long-term goals
  5. Budget
  6. Availability – time lines
  7. Competition

 

No two hotel revival projects are the same. Not even when the properties are designed similarly, and owned by the same group.

 

Are you a hotel staff painter? Your involvement may vary. Depending on the area to be revived, your level of needed skills and abilities, and your time, may vary a lot.

Are you a project painter, employed by a commercial contractor? Your involvement is clear. You are put on the project because you can produce! Big time! And your skill sets, abilities and work personality fit that project.

 

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If a task is once begun, never leave it till it’s done. Be the labor great or small, do it well or not at all!

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.” Copyright 2015. Robert Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: “627” Bathroom

Some persons are so creative, that it flows into every area of their lives. Even to the most unchangeable things. Where nothing could be done to improve it. Or, so it may seem to you, or I.

 

In one quiet week-end, one of these creatives turned what was once a small, service station bathroom into a comedic conversation piece. And, a great place to hide!

 

Room: Utility bathroom.

Overall dimensions: 8 ft. length by 6 ft. wide by 8 ft. height.

Features: Solid knotty pine paneled wall (30-inches length); 26-inch sink vanity cubicle, built-in corner shower stall, lavatory cubicle, knotty pine paneling built-in wall.

Basic construction: Concrete block walls, and shower stall walls, poured concrete floor, drywall ceiling.

Post-construction upgrade: Pink and White, alternate set, 3-inch tiles glazed ceramic over: vanity wall, shower stall walls (inside/outside) and entry, also room’s floor; pink and white, alternate set, frosted ceramic mini-tiles on shower stall floor. Knotty pine paneled wall (8-ft length): built-in lounge seat (36-inches), 2-30 inch one-half closets, overhead blanket cupboard.

 

PREP WORK

 

1. Removed all door knobs and movable fixtures.

2. Gently washed all knotty pine paneled areas, baseboard, built-in mirror frame; also entry door.

3. Once dried, sanded above surfaces with No. 220 sandpaper.

4. Thoroughly dusted all surfaces with clean, soft cloths.

 

SURFACE APPLICATIONS

 

5. Brushed and rolled thin coat of red semi-gloss interior enamel (Gliddens) on all knotty pine surfaces.

6. Once dried, lightly sanded wall surfaces and door. Re-dusted all areas with clean, soft cloths.

7. Glued over twenty, 6-inch by 8-inch black and white newsprints of British ZIGGY cartoons on paneled walls and door interior.

8. Areas were left to dry.

9. Carefully brushed thin coat of clear gloss varnish, slightly tinted with same red paint coloring used in thin first coat application.

 

SOME POPULAR, AFFORDABLE DECORATING OPTIONS FOR AN OLD BATHROOM

 

1. Stenciling – Graphic shapes, large letters, silhouettes, on the ugliest wall.

TIP: First, lightly sand with No. 220 sandpaper. Then, brush on a fresh coat of paint. Examples: white, off-white, or white ivory interior latex. (Or acrylic latex).

2. Sponge random pattern onto that same painted wall and baseboard.

TIP: Add 1-2 drops of acrylic paint – a favorite color – to one-half gallon of the white base paint.

3. Do the reverse: First paint the entire wall, or half wall, with the tinted paint.

TIP: Then, mark one horizontal line one-half distance between floor and ceiling. Mark a second horizontal line 3-4 inches below that line. Use BLUE masking tape to tape along each line, with one edge of tape on line, other outside of stripe area.

4. Create your own vertical half-wall/board effect.

TO-DO TIP: Use yardstick, or metal tape measure to mark space, horizontally, into 4-to-6 inch vertical “wood” planks.

 

The Homeowner’s True Story…

 

January, 1972— Thirty-five stranded semi-truck drivers enjoyed the cozy and clean accommodations of that colorful bathroom. For nearly three days, they huddled together inside the concrete block house under major reconstruction and expansion.

 

The truckers drank hot, black coffee and ate thinned down, home-made chili or chicken-noodle soup from small Styrofoam cups. They made quick, long-distance calls home, to let their families know they were okay. They leaned against bare wall joists, and dozed off. Totally exhausted, and feeling unsettled.

 

Every hour or so, the truckers bundled back up and braved the miserable weather to check on their diesel-powered rigs. Kept running –in place on U. S. Highway 30 – to prevent the engines from freezing up.

 

Northwest Indiana was a living nightmare for those, and thousands of other, long-haul truckers. The massive ice storm and subzero temperatures had paralyzed the area. Closing all major north and south traffic: I-65, seven miles to the west, and I-149 to the east. Nothing was moving!

 

For over fifteen years after their unplanned visit, semi-drivers whizzed and roared by on U. S. 30. Saying “HI” with their loud TOOT! TOOT! TOOT! They filled the property’s mailbox with cards and notes. They told their own extended stories of the adventure in 1972. Ones they shared with their families and friends.

 

More than one-half of the truckers joked about the little red “cartoon” bathroom. They recalled their favorite cartoons. And, they told the homeowners: “Keep that bathroom just the way it is…Don’t touch it.”

 

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Family friendships are the best! Especially when made, or rekindled, unexpectedly – and/or when especially needed.

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Thanks, everyone, for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

John’s On-Its-Way-Out Hotel

John’s 200-room hotel was down and out in every way that you could think of.

 

1. Structurally, the buildings were old, and deteriorated.

2. Essential amenities – eg. in guest rooms, eating areas, pools – were obsolete, damaged beyond repair, and compromised by mold, mildew and water leakage.

3. In the last year, staff had been cut to one-half, or less.

4. Management was top heavy.

5. Budget had been cut to 40 percent.

6. Guest occupancy ran at 40 percent, or lower.

7. The hotel property set now on a state highway, because the “U. S. Highway” designation had been moved to the new bypass two years ago.

 

Still, it held on. “I don’t think we an make it much longer,” John e-mailed. “Word has it, but management won’t tell us anything yet, that the doors will be closed by Christmas.”

 

John had three years to go to qualify for full Social Security benefits, and Medicare. Where would a 62-year old painter be able to find work? Even part-time?

 

So, John did the unthinkable. The unauthorized.

 

Every afternoon, he worked “off-the-clock” in guest rooms.

 

One-by-one, he repaired bathroom plumbing. He replaced ceramic tiles in complementary colors. He laid not no-skid mats in the bathtubs.

 

He camouflaged beat up headboard walls, by repainting them. He sponge-cleaned draperies to remove mold and mildew buildup in hidden areas. He cut fresh lemons, and stuck one or two sections inside every window air conditioner unit.

 

How could John afford the supplies that he used? Where did he get them?

 

1. He cut out all drive-through cups of coffee, snacks, fast food, and dinners out. And smoking.

2. He qualified for the local bus services. Over 60, the half-price fare. Four days a week, he left his car in the driveway at home.

3. From Home Depot, Lowes and paint stores, he purchased rejected/returned gallons of paint. Trying to stick close to very light colors, that he could tint.

4. He let people in church know that he needed used paint brushes, rollers and covers, sea sponges, etc. All in good condition. Also, partially full tubes and containers of caulking, putty, fillers, etc.

5. He talked the director of the area “Habitat for Humanity” into giving – or selling cheap – cans of primer, paint, varnish, sealer, polyurethane, etc. left over from home building projects.

6. He did what it took to get the supplies needed to fix up all of the guest rooms.

 

His efforts helped. Other staff members – eg. housekeeping and engineering – noticed. They started to stay longer, and make little improvements here and there.

 

1. A part-time housekeeper, from Trinidad, grew plants. On the transit bus, she carried pots of young foliage. After her shift, she planted them. Then, she helped the groundskeeper weed, prune and revive neglected plants, shrubs, flowerbeds, and shorter trees.

2. A kitchen worker stayed late frequently. He thoroughly cleaned, scoured and reorganized the main kitchen.

3. Two food court workers stayed on two slow days. They cleaned and reorganized the food court displays, countertops, cooking and warming areas, etc.

4. A maintenance worker helped John cut new carpet remnants into 12-inch by 12-inch squares. Then,  they laid them in the entry ways of over fifty guest rooms.

5. A laundry room attendant, that once worked in New York City’s garment district, borrowed a portable sewing machine. He re-stitched and re-hemmed over 100 quilted bedspreads, and 50 coverlets.

6. A super-store manager, located over 80 miles away, shipped boxes of slightly used bath linens, returned by customers.

 

In the end, the hotel made it through June of 2014. The owners gave a two-week notice to all staff members, including in the front offices. Here’s how the hotel staff said their good-byes.

 

* June 16 to 20. Staff was allowed to take furniture, lamps, paintings, and mirrors. They could also take linens, window treatments, fixtures, tools, supplies, kitchen and cooking utensils, china and serving pieces, table services for 8, etc.

 

* June 23 and 24. Staff helped the drivers of charity trucks load up remaining larger items in good condition: beds, sofas, chairs, desks, tables, mirrors, etc.

 

* June 25 and 26. Staff hauled all remaining pieces to two large dumpsters on the property.

 

* June 28. The staff returned and enjoyed a carry-in dinner around the (drained) pool.

 

* June 30. The utilities were shut off.

 

* June 30. The hotel’s general manager and an owner locked the doors from the outside. A security company padlocked the chain-linked fencing and gates erected to keep out intruders.

 

 

JOHN HAS NO REGRETS.

“I could have gotten into trouble. But, I never thought of it. I just tried to fix the place up… I wanted to give our hotel one last chance.”

 

 

What would you do to try to give your hotel another chance?

 

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Kudos to John! How’s life back with your family in the Antilles?

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Thanks, everyone, for your support and input. Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved

PAINTING THEM: HOTEL AND RESORT POOLS AND SPAS

There is no better place to be on a hot day then in the soothing water of a pool or spa. As a form of outdoor recreation there is little that hotel guests can do that matches the level of relaxation experienced in these environments.

However, when a pool’s or spa’s appearance and/or condition begins to fade, guests and visitors may focus their attention elsewhere.

IT IS ESSENTIAL TO MAINTAIN THE POOLS AND SPA AREAS.

 

How to maintain the appearance and durability of a pool or spa

1. Repair or replace the grout around tiles in pool skirt or spa deck area.

2. Clean all necessary ceramic tile.

3. Repair loose or cracked masonry around the pool skirt area.

4. Prime and paint with recommended Epoxy or Acrylic finish with a high abrasion resistance.

5. Repair loose or cracked surface of pool basin with appropriate waterproof patching compound.

6. Prime and finish with recommended Epoxy pool coating. (Of course, the pool must be emptied and thoroughly dry.)

7. A surface and/or finish can fail – eg. paint peeling, sheen loss, finish wear, questionable adherence.

The entire pool bed may need to be abrasive blasted to remove all paint and create an anchor to which the new finish can adhere.

8. Apply the Epoxy finish in a two-step process, using a brush and roller, or airless spray, method.

A. Apply first coat using a mixture adding 1 quart solvent to 5 gallons of paint, or 1 pint to a gallon. Allow to cure for 12-24 hours.

B. Apply final coat of finish using standard 50/50 epoxy mix catalyst and base.

9. ALWAYS use a proper breathing apparatus, while applying various coats of finish. Epoxy fumes can be extremely hazardous to your health. Take the necessary precautions.

10. Once the base color has cured for 24 hours, the associated stripes can be measured, laid out and painted. The stripes are painted normally with Epoxy, done in “black” and applied using a brush and roller system.

Painting a spa involves much of the same preparation and finishing methods as does a pool.

Some other variables that must be considered when refinishing a spa.

1. When repairing the surface, remove all loose areas and cracks.

2. Use appropriate patching compound to fill in and feather edges to the surrounding surface.

3. When applying Epoxy type paint, add an aggregate (silica sand) to the mix to promote traction and slip resistance.

4. If the spa is to be painted with an acrylic polyurethane, thin the first coat to allow for greater penetration and bonding of final coat.

5. If the spa incorporates ceramic tile, make sure they are clean and polished, have no exposed sharpedges, are not loose, and are grouted tightly. Replace broken tiles.

A swimming pool or a spa can bring many hours of fun and relaxation. It is especially appreciated when a pool or spa’s appearance and condition are well maintained. And, the pool or spa is safe to swim in.

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Have a splashing week!  Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: A Multi-Family “Home for the Homeless.”

A church congregation purchased a 210-room, two-story hotel that was headed into foreclosure. Most of the property was in reasonably good condition.

 

Mission: Provide safe, clean “transitional-to-permanent” rooms for local homeless persons. The small restaurant on the property would be converted into main kitchen, and central dining area. The food court would be removed.

 

Immediate goal: Clean, repair and renovate the property to meet local codes, and to pass regular health and safety inspections.

 

Volunteers manned the entire project. Five groups of construction people worked on repairing and renovating the property to qualify for multi-family, private, non-profit housing.

 

Group 1. A retired architect volunteered his firm’s design/build capabilities. He did the renderings, and put the plan on paper. Two student interns handled the blueprinting, CAD, schematics, etc.

 

Group 2. An area construction project management company oversaw the project.

 

Group 3. Two church members served as co-general contractors. They handled the actual remodeling of the two buildings, including repairs and replacements, and the reconfiguration of the hotel rooms into efficiency apartments, minus kitchens.

 

Group 4. Local certified trades persons did much of the code-compliant work. They included: environmental remediation/mitigation specialists, carpenters and framers, drywallers, plumbers, electricians, heating/air conditioning specialists, insulation specialists, mechanical systems specialists, roofers, pool specialists, etc.

 

Group 5. Certified craftspersons handled interior and exterior surface repairs, prepping, and finishing. They included: painters and decorators, finishers, glazers; tile and carpet installers, landscapers and nursery experts, pavers, etc.

 

A church member’s son – one of the general contractors for the project – brought me on board. While in college, he had worked summers at the hotel. Bringing a new life – and fresh purpose – to the hotel was a labor of love for him. His “in-kind” donation to the community that had nurtured him from childhood into adulthood.

 

I had five bosses, simultaneously. And all of them worked as volunteers.

 

Employer 1. Church consistory, representing the congregation.

 

My job: Match church’s painting and decorating wishes to the property’s project needs. Help select a color scheme that was “restful”. . .”harmonious”. . .”cheerful”. . .”appealing to the average person.”

 

Employer 2. Architect.

 

My job: Read the blueprints. Using renderings for each area, match the color chips for paints, stains and finishes for all surfaces. Make color-coded order lists of products and materials. Estimate the quantities for each, adding 20 percent allowance for most items, as much as 50 percent for others. Help the interns develop painting and decorating spec sheets.

 

Employer 3.  Construction project management company superintendent.

 

My job: Help select project painters. Help the lead painter to (a) comparison cost-out and order all paint, materials and supplies, and tools not standardly a part of commercial painter’s tool kit; (b) set up written work assignments for each painting and finishing crew; (c) establish flexible duty schedule; and, (d) help identify and set up “in-kind” donations of paint-related products, materials, supplies, tools, and equipment.

 

Employer 4. Co-General contractors.

 

My job: Help “generals” put together painting and decorating prospectus. Help “generals” determine the needed painter and allied trades’ skill sets.

 

Employer 5. Hotel management.

 

My job: Help identify team members interested in future employment with the non-profit housing limited liability corporation. My assigned departmental list included: facilities/maintenance, groundskeeping, housekeeping, and outdoor activity areas.

 

None of my “jobs” required me to do any actual ordering and purchasing; and/or prepping, priming, painting, and finishing of any surface. The “employers” used local people to fill the spots in Groups 4 and 5 above.

 

At least one-third of the volunteer workers in Group 4 had been homeless. Nearly one-half in Group 5 were homeless.

 

One feature of the working arrangements for Groups 4 and 5 workers that had been homeless: They were given first-choice, priority residency in the complex once it was opened for occupancy.

 

On December 20, 2014, the complex will celebrate its one year anniversary. Everyone that worked on the project, located in the southeastern part of the United States, gained many things from the experience.

 

The greatest reward for the project’s volunteer leaders and craftspersons: Seeing over 52 homeless workers walk in those front doors, and watch them being escorted – individually – to their new homes.

 

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Read about “Symphony Sam” in the true-story, co-written blog to be posted on December 22-23, 2014.  An excerpt:

 

“My mother told me recently about Symphony Sam.’ That’s the name she gave the homeless man that played virtuoso-quality music on his violin, in Chicago’s Pedway. And, handed out free copies of the official Vietnam Veterans of America newspaper. . .”

 

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Have a friends-family-fun-filled holiday season.

Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Furniture Recycling: How to Ensure Optimal Finishing Results

The recycling and refinishing of any furniture piece depends upon its overall condition. Check your piece very carefully – in full light!

Is the frame solid, and even? Are all of the legs, or feet, in good condition – no big cracks or breaks? Is the piece free of any damage or infestation from mold, mildew, termites, carpenter ants, etc? Are there any signs of water damage – eg. warping, peeling layers of wood?

IS THE PIECE WORTH THE WORK AND THE MONEY REQUIRED?

1. Assess your skills and abilities. Have you ever repaired anything? How handy are you with hand and power tools like screwdrivers, pliers, sanders, drills, and saws?

The number of projects, and the result of each, will show your understanding of tool use. No one can be fooled here. Not even the recycler himself or herself.

2. Rate your patience level. Is it up there with the fine craftspersons that are recognized, and well-paid, for their expertise, workmanship, and fine detailing? Is it down there with the “who’s that again” beginner hobbyists? Or is it somewhere in the middle, with touches on both ends?

In my experience, members in the first group tend to be patient overall, yet “impatient in their practice.” And, this adaptability helps them to persevere, until their projects are done to perfection. Those that you’ve never heard of or seen haven’t got that far yet.

That said, when choosing a furniture piece to recycle, be certain that you have enough patience and perseverance to do a quality job.

Here’s a short list for achieving the smoothest finish possible…

It’s all about multiple applications, and abrasive (eg. sandpaper) polishing between each.

1. Each type of wood requires slight variations in surface preparation. Example: Hardwood (eg. oak, cherrywood) requires thinner coatings to be applied, and finer grades of abrasives to be used.

2. The furniture can be stripped of its original finish. Then you can a apply a new color of stain, followed by separate coats of sealer and clear finish(s) – mainly varnish, polyurethane, acrylic, or urethane.

3. When the furniture is to be painted, the old paint may or may not have to be removed – based on its present adhesion.  In the case of clear-finished furniture, the surface must be sanded before applying an oil-based primer.

4. The optimal finishing always requires the complete removal of the existing finish. This is where the real work rests.  Once the stain and sealer, or first prime coat of paint, is applied and allowed to dry, the process of sanding may begin.

5. It is important to use abrasives in stages of increasing smoothness between each coat of finishing product used.  You can start with a No. 220 or 320 sandpaper, Then step down to a No. 400 only and/or on to a No.. 600. After each sanding, use a tack cloth to wipe the surface clean.

6. Each step in the sanding process increases the smoothness of the piece – including the smoothness of the finished piece.

7. The brush and roller techniques can produce fine work. If available, it’s advisable to spray finish the final coat(s) to produce the ultimate finish. Here, experience is required!

8. In the final application of using a clear finish, finishing compounds – eg. pumice powder, waxes and polishing – may be used to increase surface luster.

9. The greatest requirement for completing fine wood finishing is endless patience.

A personal  example…

My wood finishing skills were put to the test with the finishing of a newly-constructed courtroom. On completion, all of the surfaces were ultra smooth, with perfect color uniformity in the stain work.

TECHNIQUES IN PAINTING FURNITURE

The variety of finishes available is there to appeal to one’s personal sense of décor, creative style and imagination. When completed, they can be the focal point of any room, and an important part of the room’s enjoyment and usefulness.  A few examples. . . 

1. Solid color opague finishing – eg. dining room chair, entrance settee, desk 

2. Distressing, which makes furniture appear old and warm – eg. dresser, side table, lamp base

3. Crackling, where surface has cracked finish – eg. candlesticks, light fixtures

4. Federal style colors such as grey, dark red, royal blue, olive green, mustard yellow – eg. china closet, wet sink, large trunk, writing table

5. Marbelized finish, look of fine stone – eg. table top, blanket chest, bench

6. Oriental simulated lacquer, high gloss black or burgundy – eg. jewelry chest, large floor table

I’m always looking for furniture pieces to recycle, refinish, restore, rejuvenate, etc. You can, too. Starting with the furniture in the room where you’re sitting now!

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Thanks for visiting. Have fun “with the process.”

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