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Archive for the ‘Revitalizing properties’ Category

Kathy’s Creative Carpeting Solution

Kathy U. needed new living room carpeting. With five active children and a busy contractor husband, the stone-fireplaced area took a beating.

 

Big problem: The family’s budget couldn’t cover that size of expense.

 

Challenge: So, the Porter County artist, homemaker and volunteer got creative!

 

Solution: Basically, here’s how Kathryn re-carpeted the room with a Currier & Ives picturesque view of the countryside.

 

  1. She selected a basic patchwork quilt color scheme.
  2. She designed a simple block pattern of squares and rectangles.
  3. For months, she haunted area carpet stores, warehouses, installation companies, etc. and purchased, or was given, over 150 remnants with similar fibers, weaves and backing
  4. She sorted the remnants by color-hue family, into large separate cardboard boxes.
  5. Next, she laid the pieces onto the bare floor, by this time stripped of the original worn carpeting. She paid close attention to placing colors and pieces so they complemented each other. And, their weaves all went in the exact same direction.
  6. Settling on the color-pieces arrangement, she consulted with the family. “Yes,” they agreed. It was a “GO, Mom!”
  7. Starting at one corner, she turned over each piece and wrote a number on its backing.
  8. Based on each remnant’s size, she drew a grid on the room’s floor space, using a carpenter’s pencil.
  9. On grid paper – 1-inch equals 1 foot – she transferred her remnant pattern. Inside each block on the grid paper, she wrote (a) its length and width and (b) number of remnant to fit there.
  10. She purchased many spools of heavy carpet thread through a carpet installation business.
  11. Starting at the far, lowest traffic corner of the floor, she replaced each numbered remnant on its matching numbered grid block. She made certain that the weave/grain of all pieces went in the same direction.
  12. On the backing of each piece, she drew its grid measurements, allowing a ¾-inch “seam” on each side.
  13. Using a carpet cutter, she spliced each remnant along the marked cutting lines.
  14. As she cut each piece, she replaced it to its numbered spot on the gridded floor.
  15. After all pieces had been cut and laid out, she double-checked for proper dimensions, color conformity, and weave direction. (See no. 11 above.)
  16. Over a period of six months, she hand-stitched the carpet pieces together. Note: A very tough job. Kathy said it was “hard on the fingers, wrists, elbows, knees, and back!”
  17. Word leaked out about the woman’s unique creative project: the hand-sewn patch quilt carpet. Area media took photos of the newly carpeted room, and published or aired stories on Kathryn U.
  18. Friends, neighbors and relatives appeared for the open house when Kathryn unveiled the beautiful hand-stitched, wall-to-wall carpet.

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Necessity may be the mother of invention, but a creative soul is the mother of true art.

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Thank you for taking a pause to visit “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016, 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: Covering Substrate Flaws with Decorating Finishes

Decorative finishing can cover a lot of flaws in a substrate. Or an entire area, for that matter.

 

It is an ideal solution for improving or enhancing the aesthetic appearance of a wall, furniture piece, fixture, etc.

 

. You can get very creative in the choice of color(s), patterns, and finishes.

. You can produce amazing results within a limited time to do it – and a limited budget.

. You can use up extra paint in the paintshop, that otherwise might go unused – and go bad.

. You can add a new look, theme and spirit to the total atmosphere.

. You can even increase the value of the property.

 

I rely on decorative finishing – especially faux – to add new life to walls, trim and baseboard, window frames, built-ins, cabinetry fronts (eg. wood), and even floors and doors. It works wonders on furniture, fixtures, mirror and picture frames, decorative accessories, even faded and scratched appliance shells.

 

I’ve seen a faux finished piece or area give residents in assisted living facilities or nursing homes a tremendous lift in mood and attitude, new energy, and new interest in life. I’ve been amazed at how it can renew a sense of hope and motivation in high school students at a low-rated, run down school. I’ve watched as young, mentally challenged children in a hospital smiled and cheered when led into a colorfully accented, faux finished playroom.

 

The possibilities are practically endless. Limited only by you and your readiness to experiment, to create, to invent.

 

 

12 Tips for Creating Decorative Finishes that Float Flaws Out of Sight.

 

  1. Select a faux design or technique that will add to, not detract from, the overall design and purpose of the room, piece, etc.
  2. Uncertain what will look great, versus a visual mistake? Take a little time; and apply each finish you’re considering onto separate sample boards.
  3. Choose an easy design/technique and one color hue when you want or need fast results. Examples: colorwashing, sponging, spattering.
  4. Is your budget real tight? Choose the paint color of a product already in the paintshop.
  5. Choose a paint color that you have when both the base coat and faux glaze must closely blend with the established color scheme of the property, office, home, etc.
  6. Choose a glaze two or more hues brighter when you want to achieve a sharper contrast effect.
  7. Don’t be afraid to mix two or three faux techniques together on the same surface, or even on different parts of, say, a furniture piece. Example: Combing on table legs and feet, sponging on side panels, ragging on top.
  8. For ultimate fun, apply the same technique/design to different parts of a wall, using different colors of glaze over the same base coat color. Example: Red, rust, copper.
  9. Is the table top bruised but the rest of wood piece is okay? Choose base coat in same or darker tone of current wood finish. Then, apply glaze in dark color, that’s close to base color. Or, apply a subtle color that contrasts with the base coat.
  10. Is the front of lobby’s wood counter heavily nicked, scratched, gouged, and even cracked? Apply base coat that’s darker than the wood finish on entire unit. Then apply two colors of glazing using wood grain finish.
  11. Is the top of the general manager’s or president’s large walnut desk have ink and water stains, also burn marks? Apply black base coat. Then apply dark green, royal blue or wine glaze using marbleizing technique.
  12. When the paint amount available is limited, use dry brushing to create a textured effect.
  13. When the area is smaller, use dragging technique to create clean, striped effect.

 

 

You get the idea. There are few substrate and surface flaws that cannot be camouflaged with one or more faux finishes.

 

There are faux finish techniques available to treat nearly every surface appearance problem of a substrate.

 

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Take the time to learn, to try, and to use faux finishes to cover flaws

of otherwise great surfaces, areas, and pieces.

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Thanks, everyone, for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Remodeling, Retrofitting and Redecorating for an 81-Year Old “Roommate”

 

A literary agent, with whom I’ve become acquainted, lives in a hotel penthouse in Manhattan. She calls it the smartest investment that she’s ever made.

 

The woman protects her investment by self-paying for the remodeling, and the painting and decorating, of the 4,500 square foot property.

 

She keeps a small, by comparison, 2,000 square foot apartment in South Florida. On the top floor of an ocean front hotel. She self-pays for the painting and decorating of that property, too.

 

Both homes are decorated in light-toned natural woods, fibers and colors. And relaxing patterns.

* Woods: Oak, pine, olive ash, and sycamore.

* Fibers: Leather, chenille, chintz, and cords.

* Colors: Ivory, ecru, soft coral, muted lime green, and pale turquoise.

* Patterns: Narrow stripes, one-half to one-inch checks, and small block prints; subdued geometrics, pastel floral garden prints.

 

Both homes are furnished and accessorized with an eclectic collection of pieces from the Midwest. Some have been inherited or “gifted” from relatives. Others have been purchased from small antique and second-hand shops in western Ohio and eastern Indiana.

 

What stands out about the person is what also stands out about her homes. (And her office.) A practical, understated and low-stress approach to business, relationships, and life.

 

In 2015, the 30+ year publishing veteran started to remodel both her New York City and Miami homes. They are being retrofitted to accommodate her new roommate: her 81-year old mother.

 

The younger woman runs three miles every day. The older woman hand-pushes her wheelchair or walker around every foot, every day.

 

In some ways, their lives couldn’t be more different. In most ways, starting now, their schedules couldn’t be more in sync. And, their needs and preferences couldn’t be more unique.

 

The same woods and colors are being used, as before. Some fibers will change.

 

All structural impediments are being removed: steps, stairs, raised/lowered floor areas, landings; protruding walls, sharp corners, barriers, protrusions. Doorways are being widened to at least 42 inches. All doors will open outward, from whichever side a person is approaching. Also, they will open by a touch pad, or remote-controlled beam.

 

What the literary agent calls “ballet bars” – actually padded safety bars – are being installed along every walkway, wall, base cabinetry unit/section, etcetera. Also in every bathtub and shower, the outdoor patio, etc.

 

All plush carpeting has been removed, and will be replaced with tightly-woven commercial grade floor covering. Like you find in fine restaurants, hotels and resorts, hospitals, business complexes.

 

All sinks, cupboards, countertops, appliances, fixtures, commodes, etc. are being lowered or raised to ease their use.

 

All upholstered pieces will be outfitted with washable, rubber-backed, and soft snugly-fitting slipcovers. All window treatments and systems – shades, blinds, curtains, drapes – will be controlled by remote, or by hand. So will all fixtures – eg. lighting, faucets. So will all cabinet, drawer, closet, and appliance doors.

 

The idea is to help make both homes as livable as possible for both “roommates.” To make accommodations for impairments, special needs, and even future limitations natural and easy to use. While making the preferences of each resident an important part of the “blended lifestyle”!

 

As the daughter and homeowner puts it, “I want to provide a very safe and secure home. And a sanctuary for now, and the future. For both of us…”

 

On the day that I stood inside the Florida apartment, rain pelted against the French doors, that led to the extra wide patio. Through the haze, I could see the ocean waves rolling into shore.

 

“It’s all so beautiful,” a soft voice, weakened by age and illness, remarked from beside me. “A very different, but good beautiful from our old home in Ohio.”

 

The lady sat in her wheelchair. A fleece-lined pants and hooded jacket in soft daffodil yellow kept her cozy. She peered through her new pair of binoculars.

 

“What a place! If Daddy (her husband) could see us now!”

 

“Wait till our Florida place is completely remodeled, retrofitted and redecorated, Mom.”

 

What an honor to be a part of such a special project.

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Accommodating for others’ needs and preferences also accommodates for our own.

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Thanks for being a part of the world of “life” and for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Estate Properties: Repainting and Redecorating within the Sale Prep Budget

A loved one passes away, and is laid to rest. His or her estate must be settled in a legally acceptable and timely order. The residence – eg. house, townhouse, condo – is a major part of that estate. And, it must be sold.

 

Often, each heir will have a wish list for using his or her share of the monetary proceeds. Each heir expects to get at least a certain amount.

 

The final sale price must be maximized. The property needs to undergo a facelift, before it goes on the market.

 

A Skilled Painter and Decorator’s role

 

A painter, skilled in renovation and restoration – especially of estate properties – can hold the key to realizing a lucrative sale.

 

  1. The painter will be able to accentuate the home’s attributes and advantages.
  2. The painter will be able to upgrade the home’s features to appeal to today’s real estate market.
  3. The painter will be able to camouflage or minimize its flaws – uneven walls, cracked wood.
  4. The painter will be able to suggest or advise the seller(s) about other work to have done, and by whom.

 

The painter can help the estate trustee or administrator work up a total facelift estimate.

Also, the painter/decorator can help determine an itemized budget range for each service that needs to be completed. Prior to listing the property for sale.

 

Painting/decorating tips gleaned from giving an interior facelift to a home prior to listing.

 

Keep the facelift simple. Make it suitable to the home’s architecture, style, worth, and location.

 

  1. TIP: To minimize the pale yellow cast of once white ceilings, custom tint white latex wall a very light yellow-white. This stretches facelift budget that cannot cover repainting of ceilings.

 

  1. TIP: Paint all walls throughout the home the same custom-tinted paint mentioned above. This creates flowing, uniform look.

 

  1. TIP: Repaint the bathrooms in their same original color – in this case soft yellow. This helps contain paint product costs.

 

  1. TIP: Limit repainting in kitchens, breakfast nooks, etc. that often feature tiled wall areas.

 

  1. TIP: Select high-end paint products, known (a) offer better coverage and (b) require only one coat. Especially in older homes, and in certain climates.

 

  1. TIP: Give ample attention to cleaning and prepping all surfaces to be re-finished. Examples: patching, filling, caulking, sanding. Allot enough drying time between steps and applications. Remember: The quality of a finishing job is linked directly to the quality of the surface prepping.

 

  1. TIP: Limit priming to surfaces that really need it. Hint: Areas that will likely stay the same finish color for at least the first year of new ownership.

 

  1. TIP: Apply finish coat to walls, trim, doors, etc. room-by-room. Or, whichever way that will assure ample drying time, a uniform finish throughout, and save in overall labor costs.

 

 

Before you call in a painter. . .

 

Empty the home’s interior to the walls. Here are a few tips to help you.

 

  1. Distribute and remove all personal items. (Follow the terms of the trust and/or will.) This includes all types of items such as furniture, accessories, appliances; china, silver, housewares, cookware; clothing, jewelry; linens, textiles; antiques, collectibles, books, etc.

 

  1. Remove and place remaining valuables in the hands of the best available dealers. Examples: expensive jewelry, art; antiques, collectibles, glass, books.

 

  1. If there’s time, hold a “class act” yard sale for the rest of personal property. Roll out the red carpet bargain-prices. Offer boxed/bagged/packaged group deals. Offer some quality items for free.

 

  1. GOOD NEIGHBOR TIP: If your loved one lived in the neighborhood for years: Invite close neighbors to come and select a few items to keep. No charge.

 

  1. Donate some of the nicer clothing, accessories, linens, etc. to a local church-run thrift shop.

 

  1. Donate whatever is left to the nearest Goodwill Industries, Salvation Army, or similar charity store. Call in advance to make certain they offer pick-up service.

 

Giving a home its final touches of paint and finish – facelift – before its estate sale can be rewarding.

In a way, the painter gets the opportunity to help the family give their loved one’s property a proper send off. And, that may help those left behind find some sense of closure.

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When people know how much you care about them, they care about how much you know.

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Special thanks to supporters through LinkedIn.com and Google+.  See you on the IN-side.

And, thanks, everyone, for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Paola the Painter’s As Told-To Story from Madrid

 

For her fifteenth birthday, Teresa wanted “patriotic” walls. The colors of her country, Spain: Red and Gold. In two weeks, she was having a sleep-over. She wanted her bedroom to be perfect.

 

So, her father, Mario, called his brother, Stefan, at the hotel, where he worked as Concierge II.

 

“Leave this to me,” Stefan told his brother.

 

Two days later, Paola, house painter, arrived at the two-story flat on Av de Pablo, near Retiro District, in Madrid. He carried an arm load of empty boxes into the house.

 

Clearing out the space…

 

He removed the teenager’s posters and pictures, taped to the walls of her room. He placed her treasures into boxes. He removed the sheets, coverlet and pillows from her bed, and put them safely into the largest box.

 

Paola rolled up Teresa’s faded green rug. He pushed her furniture to the center of the room. He covered them with “three large old sheets.”

 

Next, he hurried down to his economie automobile. He returned, carrying supplies: three buckets of paint, brushes, a roller, and three covers; a large dropcloth; a new 6-foot stepladder; and, a long narrow cardboard box. A curious, retired neighbor man volunteered to help.

 

The painter stretched out the dropcloth, careful to cover the wood floor from corner to corner. He began to ready his supplies.

 

Teresa’s Surprise No. 1…

 

Teresa returned home late that evening. After her classes, and part-time job at the family la panaderia (bakery). Wide painter’s masking tape stretched across the doorway of her room. A large sign was posted onto the door.

 

“Teresa, Sleep with your sister tonight. Love, Mama and Poppo.”

 

Paola began the work…

 

First, he dusted, sanded and wiped off every surface to be finished.

 

Next, Paola painted…

 

  1. He painted the top half of three walls a “delicate” Yellow Gold. Equivalent to Lily SW 6693. In semi-gloss latex

 

  1. Then, he painted the bottom. half of three walls. Walls 1 and 2: “Deepened Red.” Equivalent to Real Red SW 6869; Wall 3: “Deepened Sun Gold. “ Equivalent to Glitzy Gold SW 6691.

 

  1. He installed wallpaper on Wall 4: Narrow bright Yellow-Gold stripes on bright White background. (Paper had subtle sheen.)

 

  1. Next, mid-way on all four walls, he nailed in place railing strips. Painted bright White. The railing was Paola’s personal gift to Teresa.

 

  1. Last, he painted the door frame, window trim, and baseboards that same “lightened” Yellow Gold, SW 6693. Paint: High-gloss latex.

 

Teresa’s Birthday Surprise…

 

By the time Teresa returned home from classes the next day, a big surprise waited. Her mother and sister smiled. Her father sat in the kitchen, waiting.

 

“Hi, Mama. Poppo, you’re early from work. Did something happen?” They only smiled back.

 

She walked down the hall to her bedroom. Her parents and sister followed. The sign and tape had been removed from her door. She opened the door. A loud scream filled the air.

 

“FANTASTIQUE”

 

The “patriotics” of her beloved Spain filled the room. From the ceiling to the floor.

 

The Finishing Touches to Teresa’s Room…

 

Over Teresa’s old bed laid a quilted coverlet and matching pillow shams. Fabric: Cotton Chintz. Colors and Pattern: dainty Red Carnation floral .Window curtains, made of the same fabric, hung at her tall window. The pieces were a special gift from Uncle Stefan. Paola’s wife, a seamstress, had made them.

 

Younger sister, Traci, handed her a package. “These are for you. I made them. Mama helped.”

 

Inside were three small, square pillows. One was covered in a solid Red nubby fabric, one in a solid shiny Gold, the third in a bright Lime Green.

 

Tears spilled from the teenager’s eyes. Lately, she’d been feeling overwhelmed. Unappreciated, too. (Her schedule.)

 

What a difference a little paint job made in a teenager’s life!

 

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Paint something for a young person in your life. Send a smile into her or his soul.

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting Hotels: Creating Curbside Charm

A hotel’s appeal starts in three places: on-line, on-app, and at-the-curb.

 

Its exterior image can attract or deter guests and visitors patronage, loyalty and referrals. It can help position the hotel in the lodging and convention marketplace. It can help establish and sustain its place in the business community.

 

How can the hotel’s painter and decorator create, or enhance, the business’s curbside appeal and image?

 

A FEW CREATIVE AND COST-EFFECTIVE OPTIONS

 

Area: Property’s front-main entrance and gate.

 

Main Entrance Walls: Masonry.

Paint color: Lt. yellow gold. Other examples: Cream 45yy721230, Glidden Exterior semi-gloss; H&C Concrete Solid Color Stain/low-lustre, water-base over previous paint surface. Gates: wrought iron, baked enamel. Color: Black.

 

Project: Paint wall top and edging a color that complements main color used in area.

Paint color: White No. 60yy831094. Glidden’s Heavy-duty exterior semi-gloss masonry paint. Other colors: Egg White No. SW6364, or Tandy Green No. SW 6424, both Sherwin-Williams; H&C Exterior Concrete Color Stain/Sealer. TIP: One coat using heavy duty, premium product.

 

CAUTION: A color that sharply contrasts with area’s predominant color can detract, even cheapen, overall appearance of entire area. Example: Entrance walls: Cream or lt. yellow gold; Trim: Bright or deeper red, Exterior high-gloss paint.

 

Project: Construct “WELCOME” sign. Tap a woodcrafting staff member – in any department – to design and construct sign and posts.

Construction: Use treated exterior wood, such as oak.

Letters: Paint or stain in brightest/darkest hue of hotel’s predominant color scheme color. Examples: Paint color: Dark Lake Blue, 90BG 08/075, or Forest Green 07BG 08/244, both Glidden’s Exterior semi-gloss; Stain: Pine Needle SW3009, Sherwin-Williams.

Sign body and posts: Mask off dry letters. Stain, using ample product. Let penetrate. Wipe with clean, soft cloths. Apply two coats of exterior clear polyurethane to entire sign.

Alternate method: First, stain sign body and posts. Let penetrate. Wipe with clean, soft cloths. Then, paint or stain the letters. Let dry. Last, apply two coats of exterior clear polyurethane. Allow ample dry time between coats.

 

Area: Lobby Entrance Exterior.

 

Project: Paint two park benches in a color that matches a color in hotel’s and lobby’s scheme.

Seats/backs: Paint colors: Real Red SW6868, Radish SW6861, or Positive Red SW 6871, all available in Duration, SuperPaint or Resilience Exterior Acrylic Coatings, Sherwin-Williams; Bright Juniper Green C40, 50GY51/437, or Caribbean Sea B40, 56BG 23/355, Glidden’s.

Product type: Glidden’s Heavy-duty exterior high-gloss enamel.

Bench metal frames/braces: Paint color: Black, Glidden’s or Sherwin-Williams. Product type: Rust-proof, fade-proof heavy-duty metal/steel paint.

Finish coat entire bench: One or two coats of exterior heavy-duty clear coat to all surfaces. NOTE: Finish back and underside of bench.

 

Project: Where’s your mascot? A life-size model belongs at the lobby entrance doors. Freshly painted or stained, and clear-coated.

 

Areas: Guest Building Exteriors.

 

Project: Use color scheme that matches front entrance colors that match hotel’s color scheme.

Main color: Light hue of predominant color. Accent color: darker shade in same family.

Alternate color: Darker shade of predominant color. Accent/trim color: light hue of same color.

Alternate: Light hue of predominant color. Accent color: Comparable hue, complementary color.

COLOR TIP: Softer hues invite rest and relaxation, particularly in blues and greens.

 

Areas/Surfaces: Exterior Signage Around Buildings.

 

Project: Natural wood signs, that identify indigenous plants, flowers, trees.

Treated new wood: Spray or brush clear stain/sealer onto entire wood area of signs. Wipe dry. Letters/numbers: Hand paint if smaller; spray if larger. One coat fine with premium product. Color idea: Dark shade of darkest color in hotel’s color scheme. Finish coat: Spray entire sign with two finish coats of exterior, heavy-duty clear coating for wood signage.

 

Project: Wood – painted signs.

Used wood: Clean, wash and sand all surfaces. Prime entire sign and posts. TIP: Spray can primer works great here. Retain light, short spray motions to avoid runs, splotches, corner globs. Letters/numbers: Hand or spray paint. Color idea: Dark shade of darkest color scheme color.

For contrast: If letters/numbers are raised, hand paint sides with contrasting color. Steady hand!

Finish coat: Spray entire sign with two coats of exterior heavy-duty semi-gloss latex or enamel. For contrast: Paint outer edges of entire sign in paint color used for letters/numbers.

DURABILITY TIP: Avoid bright yellows, reds, purples that tend to fade faster.

 

Areas: Walkways Between Buildings.

 

Project: “Park-a-Bench”®* along every walkway. More than one is ideal.

TIP: Place a bench along every stretch, between each cross-walk. (* Registration pending: RDH.)

 

A painter friend at a South Florida hotel spearheaded a staff “Paint-a-Bench”® workshop.

 

What they did: “Crew” repaired and refinished used park benches located on the property. Also, some staff members got “donations” of unused, unwanted benches from neighboring hotels.

What colors they used: Each park bench was painted in a color that matched or complemented the hotel’s overall color scheme. Protective finish: Two coats, exterior heavy-duty clear coat.

Personal touch: Each park bench was named after an ocean mammal or fish.

How long it took: Period of three months, each “team” completed two or three benches.

Who paid for what: Hotel’s property management company paid for the paint primers and finish products, also thinners and cleaners. A local contractor donated a supply of sandpaper and gently used brushes and rollers. The hotel’s G.M. donated the rolls of plastic sheeting/drop cloths.

 

COLOR TIP:  Brights excite. Hues subdue.

 

Thanks to some creative, visionary and  practical G.Ms. and property owners, I’ve had the honor to execute each of the projects suggested here. Each project varied from the overview offered in this post. Much more “creative license” was expected and built into the process. The results: Aesthetically alluring, “amenities” in their own right, and value-adding.

 

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Sometimes, stepping out-of-the-box is the best way to keep in step

with your global community.

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Stay safe, everyone. And, thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting Them: Closets with Class

Add appeal, style and even a new life to closets, or closet alcoves, in your hotel, facility – or home.

 

1. Paint the entire area in a color that complements with the room’s color. Example: Room color: off-white, closet color: light sand.

TIP: Use up some interior paint color no longer needed, because of a property color scheme change.

 

2. Paint the most visible closet wall in the same color used in the room. Paint the side walls in a contrasting color.

 

3. Create horizontal border effect on all of the closet walls.

A. Paint lower two-third of walls the same color used in room.

B. Paint upper one-third of walls in white, or contrasting color.

C. Or, reverse it: Contrast or white on lower part, main room’s color as upper border.

 

4. Paint all walls white, or light tint of the color on room’s walls.

Install wallpaper border on the room wall outside of the closet, running it around walls inside the closet.

 

5. Install remnant wallcoverings, purchased at paint store. Mix and match.

A. Supplier tip: Check with major local contractors that do a lot of wallcovering installation.

B. Shopping tip: Look for colors that complement or contrast with your regular color scheme.

C. Material tip: Look for white-on-white stripes, subtle patterns, textures that remind you of scenes/areas/amenities on your property.

D. Great find: Commercial grade products. Examples: Designs such as pebbles, grasscloths, hemps; laminated wood veneers; leathers. These wallcoverings are very durable, and usually come in wide panels. NOTE: Many tend to be heavier, and harder to handle.

 

6. Install wallpaper or vinyl on the most visible wall in the closet, or closet alcove. After painting other walls in lighter hue of nearest room wall color.

 

7. Install complementary wallcoverings on adjoining walls of closet, or closet alcove.

 

GENERAL TIPS:

Colors: Keep it/them light, and neutral.

Textures: Keep it/them durable, easy-to-clean and similar.

Patterns: Keep them complementary to others in the area, and to those used in adjoining room.

Special Effects: As creative as you can get. As creative as management will let you be.

Panel directions: Horizontal, vertical, diagonal. Whatever!

 

A CLOSET WITH A VIEW. . .

 

A relative in Ohio moved into a large corner studio in an assisted living facility. She had one window. It overlooked the end of a parking lot. She had two closets.

 

Her grandsons decided to turn the smaller closet into a work-computer space for Grandma Anne.

 

1. They installed a soft, pink-on-white vertical striped wallpaper on the room’s wall, adjacent to the window wall.

2. They installed the same wallcovering on the two side walls of the closet.

3. On the closet’s back wall, they installed a “window garden scene” panel of wallpaper, with the same pink-on-white pattern/background as the panels hung on the closet’s side walls.

4. Inside the closet, they installed a remnant white marble laminate counter.

5. On one end, they installed adjustable shelving, that faced the counter, not the doorway.

6. Under the counter, they slid in a two-drawer metal cabinet, repainted high-gloss petal pink.

7. With management’s written authorization, the grandsons ran a multiple-plug panel from the room’s nearest outlet, into the closet, on the floor. No lighting fixtures were installed in the closet. Mainly because of code regulations and property restrictions.

 

Today, Anne sits at her counter…emails family and friends…does on-line personal business…and enjoys the special outside view.

 

Closets can be great fun to decorate.

 

The creative opportunities are endless. Their smaller dimensions, standardly, make them perfect spots to use up fabulous, left-over, better or top quality products and materials. To experiment with new layouts, and techniques. To try new combinations of colors, patterns and textures.

 

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Try a closet on for size! Make each one a little unique!

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Thank you for taking an interest in your space. And for visiting “Painting with Bob.”
Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

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