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Archive for the ‘Surfaces and Areas’ Category

Four Unusual Guest Rooms in Un-ordinary Locations

1. FOCAL POINT: Red iridescent 1967 Mustang life-size mural. Air-brushed and hand-painted on 42-foot north wall.

Lodging type: Private inn with 8 bedrooms and 5 bathrooms.
Structure: Former Amish farm house.
Location: Northeast Indiana.
Room’s description: Third floor attic suite. Dimensions: 24-feet wide by 42 feet long.
Light source: Two dormers on front and back sides, one on each end.
Floor: Smooth-planed, tongue and groove hardwood. Note: more than 130 years old.
Walls: Drywall. Finish: White Snowfall, Color No. SW 6000 semi-gloss latex.
Ceiling: Drywall. Finish: Two layers of clear faux glaze over white flat base coat.
Paint products manufacturers: Sherwin-Williams; also Liquitex Acrylic Artist Paints.

2. FOCAL POINT: Panoramic re-creation of rare books reading room in Newberry Collectors Library, Chicago. Custom wallpaper mural wraps around 32-feet north and 22-feet east walls.

Lodging type: Hostel catering to travelers ages 60 and over; 8 bedrooms, each sleeping 7-8.
Structure: Abandoned industrial warehouse.
Location: West side of Chicago.
Room’s description: Second floor. Dimensions: 32-feet by 22-feet.
Light sources: 4 large, 18-paned steel-framed swing-hinged windows.
Floors: Wall-to-wall commercial grade carpeting over hardwood. Pattern: Salt-n-Pepper-neutrals.
Walls: 3 – Bare concrete block, smooth floated. Finish: Stain: Softer Tan, Color no. SW 6141.
Mural wall: Drywall installed, then white latex base coat rolled on two weeks before mural hung.
Ceiling: Dropped 18-inch frosted tiles, grid frames.
Furniture: Twin-sized bed foundations made from shortened oblong library tables; small reading tables became bedside/night stands.
Paint products manufacturer: H&C/S-W (concrete block walls); Drywall base coat.

Personal note: At age twelve, I visited the Newberry Library for the first time. Six years younger than the required minimum age of eighteen. I filled out a form requesting a book to read, I was seated at a table. A library concierge brought the volume, and placed it on a small table-top easel in front of me. She showed me how to turn the pages by using a special wand with felt tips. Note: All works had to be read there.

3. FOCAL POINT: Two Brown bear cubs in Wisconsin north woods scene. Life-size mural covers 24-feet long wall.

Lodging Type: Extended-stay family motel, that accommodates traumatic brain injured children.
Structure: Former two-story elementary school.
Location: North Appalachian Mountains.
Room description: First floor. Dimensions: 24-feet by 32-feet, part of 3-room suite plus bath.
Light source: Skylights.
Floors: Wall-to-wall commercial carpeting. Pattern: Houndstooth. Colors: Med-to-forest greens.
Walls: Smooth-floated plaster. Three walls painted Emerald Line: Cotton White, Color no: SW 7104, tinted with Byte Blue, Color no. SW 6498.
Ceilings: Dropped white pearl frosted acoustical tile squares set into flat white grid frames.
Paint product manufacturers: Sherwin-Williams; Liquitex Acrylic Artist Paints.

The Process: I installed the custom woodland mural onto the 18-feet by 32-feet wall facing south. Then I hand-painted and air-brushed both cubs into the foreground, using the designer’s template. By the way, the woods scene was a reproduction of a photo taken by the property owner. He was a freelance nature photographer for The National Geographic Society.

4. FOCAL POINT: View from the top of Jack’s Beanstalk. Hand and air-brush painted.

Lodging type: City inn.
Structure: Former 23-room luxury apartment.
Location: West Central Park, New York City
Room Dimensions: 15-feet by 26 feet
Light source: 2 tall adjacent windows overlooking the park.
Walls: Drywall. Painted white semi-gloss latex base coat; then two layers of faux stippling glaze: 1 part White Mint, color no: SW 6441, 3 parts Cotton White, color no. SW 7104, semi-gloss latex.
Ceilings: Popcorn texture, pin-dot effect. Paint: Cotton White, color no. SW 7104.
Paint products manufacturers: Behr’s; Grumbacher Acrylic Artist Paints.

The Process: A graphic designer sketched the Jack’s Beanstalk design on paper first. Then, a projector shot the image onto the wall. The same designer used colored chalk pencils to “trace” that image. Next, she used an air-brush spray system to paint the design. The painted mural was allowed to dry and settle for two days. Last, the artist sprayed on a fine coat of clear glaze mist.
THE EFFECT: Like looking through the clouds.
Paint products manufacturers: Glidden’s; Liquitex Low-Gloss acrylics.

Most painters and decorators envision the unusual and unique projects they’d like to have a hand in creating.

A Few Tips for Getting Started in Design-Mural Painting

1. Explore these outlets during your off days, and hours.
2. Decide which type of creative project really interests you.
3. Practice the special techniques required. If you can afford it, take a high-rated class at your local art school. Opt for a professional artist-instructor. Check out background, credits, awards.
4. Study recognized designers-muralists. Their backgrounds, styles, methods, paint selections.
5. To start out, you may want to work under an experienced creative painter/artist on one of his or her projects. Recommended: Help on your off time. Keep the day job.
6. When ready to “solo,” work on these special projects on the side. Start with simpler designs.
7. Leave your regular painting job behind only if and when you have a solid potential client and project base established. And, if and when you want to make that career change.

My view: Hand-painted murals are a gift to the surface… the atmosphere… the viewer!

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Thanks for being here on this planet. And, thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Hotel Painting During Slow Seasons

 

In lodging, the slow season varies in different regions of the country – even in certain areas within a given state.

 

The climate – weather – has a lot to do with it. So do school terms, vacation times – both school and employment; busy seasons in a specific industry, trade or business.

 

In Florida, the slow season tends to fall between the second week of January through March, or even April.

 

If you’re a staff painter working in Florida, the slower season is a good time to get things done. Fewer guests and visitors, fewer emergency calls and work orders, and fewer interruptions.

 

But, the “slow season” is also the period of lower revenues, lowered budget, and much fewer resources.

 

If you’re a contract painter, the slower period may be the right time to branch out and to do some freelance work.

 

SIX SLOW SEASON SOLUTIONS FOR THE STAFF PAINTER

 

  1. Before Day 1 of the slow season, decide with your chief engineer (a) what work orders and projects must stay on the roster, and (b) what projects must be shelved.
  2. Take a closer look at that list of necessary work orders and projects. Whittle it down by 25 percent.
  3. Then, prioritize those according to daily and weekly jobs.
  4. Next, establish a budget, or cost estimate, for each – based on the supplies needed to do each.
  5. Take a closer look. You may see that the list of necessary work orders and projects can be shortened. Example: Working on “bathrooms re-paint” project can be spread out over a longer period of time. Say five bathrooms a week or every two weeks, versus five a day.
  6. The toughest time: Shelve the “necessary” work orders and projects that require the most outlay of money for materials and supplies. Note: That may be the most money for few supplies.                  TIP: This amount may end up being your allotment for paintshop emergencies. Your contingency fund.
  7. Now you’re ready to schedule out your work load for each week during the dry spell, budget-wise.
  8. Be prepared for additional cutbacks (a) across-the-board organizationally, then (b) unilaterally throughout your Engineering Department.
  9. When you’re asked or expected to perform paintshop miracles during an already “bare bones” massive budget freeze, here’s what you do next:
  10. GET CREATIVE. GET TOUGH. GET WISE.

 

Seek out and volunteer to perform other essential tasks in your department – eg. maintenance, grounds. Volunteer to split your work-day time. Help out in another busier department that has also suffered staff cutbacks – eg. housekeeping, kitchen, guest services

 

Your bottom line objectives during any slow season:

  1. Keep the paintshop running.
  2. Keep your job.

 

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“Slower season” does not mean it’s the time for you to slow down on the job.

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Thank you for staying on task, whatever your regular job description.

 

Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob” blog.

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Paintshop: What is the Best Paint?

Paints and coatings are similar. What separates them from each other is their ability to retain color and their durability of sheen.

 

The typical factors, which can affect this, are (1) surface exposure to the sun, (2) cleanliness, and (3) humidity.

 

First of all, to find the “best possible paint” for your application, consult paint store and manufacturer recommendations.

 

As a rule, you get what you pay for. Normally, the best quality paint will have the highest price. With the modern development in coatings research, the quality of paint is at its highest level. Now, there are paints which combine primer as part of their formulation.

 

Usually, I prefer to use a suitable primer, then let it dry. And I apply a top coat, especially designed for that surface and that primer-top coat combination. To each his own, however.

 

Each surface requires a paint that is specific to its requirements. You wouldn’t put latex paint on bare steel. And, you wouldn’t prime the steel with the recommended primer and then apply a latex finish paint. If you don’t know the difference, you might.

 

There are “best paints” for every class of surfaces. Here are a few of them.

 

  1. Exterior masonry. Use an elastomeric coating. It’s a high-build, water-proofing material.
  2. Steel. Use epoxy primer and finish. They provide an extremely durable, chemical resistant finish.
  3. Interior drywall. Use acrylic latex. It leaves a highly washable, color retentive finish.
  4. Non ferrous metal. Use oil galvanizing primer. It has excellent adhesive properties.
  5. Automotive. Use urethane. It has ultimate durability, high color retention, resist abrasions.
  6. All surfaces. Use oil-based paint. It provides excellent durability, color retention, resist stains.

 

Then, there are my “best brand paint picks.” Opinions may vary. Yet, there are standards of quality, cost and reputation for each manufacturer.

 

  1. Interior/Exterior house paints: #1 Glidden; #2 Sherwin Williams; #3 Behr.
  2. Wood finishes: #1 Minwax; #2 Olympia.
  3. Masonry: #1 Glidden; #2 Sherwin Williams.
  4. Fine finish metals: #1 DuPont, #2 Sherwin Williams.
  5. Industrial coatings: #1 Sherwin Williams.

 

There are many paint and coatings’ manufacturers out there. Do your research, especially when you are questioning a surface’s compatibility with a particular paint type. Paint failures or a reduced life of the sheen can occur if the wrong selection is made.

 

 

A STORY OF EXTREMES

 

As a commercial painter, I was once assigned a job to decorate the front offices and lobby of an automotive body shop. My job was to paint all of the drywall ceilings, with a flat white latex, and to apply vinyl wall coverings to all of the walls and the electrical cover plates. It sounded simple enough.

 

But as I got started, I saw several of the body shop workers carrying stack s of wood moulding into their service area. And when the doors arrived – about 12 of them, they were taken to that area as well.

 

I was busy doing my own work. Until one day, I went back and discovered a couple of body shop employees working on the doors and woodwork. They were painting them.

 

I thought:  Well, that’s just fine. Then, I realized that the paint they were using was not the run of the mill latex or oil I would have used. I was shocked, yet totally amazed at what they were doing.

 

The owner had chosen to finish his woodwork with automotive paint. I never heard of such a thing. On his own, the owner decided to experiment.

 

The product he chose to use was a two-part urethane with a clear coat final finish.  The finish was known for its unsurpassed durability and extremely high gloss.

 

Okay! I waited and continued with my duties. In the last days of my work, I got to see the carpenters putting everything up. Room by room, they installed the doors and the trim. Then the body shop guys sprayed the last coat of clear coat.

 

We had a party upon completion of the project. And we got to witness the end result. It was beyond words.

 

THE DOORS! I’m not kidding. You could see yourself. When you walked along the casing or baseboard, you could see your reflection as you walked by. Not only that: This interior finishing had the most durable finish I had ever seen.

 

When I talked to the owner, he said: “I want my shop to be the only one of its kind. I want it to be perfect. I don’t care how long it takes. And money is no object.”

 

By the way, he invited shop owners from all over the area to the party. So they could admire the work done on his body shop. And, I even got to take a bow.

 

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Creative results are often the harmonious blend of the norm with the impossible.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: How to Apply a Marquetry Design to a Floor

The Marquetry application is for those who aspire for decorative beauty, but do not have the funds to construct an inlaid wood floor. That tends to mean most of us. Marquetry is a combination of designs using color geometric shapes and small pictorial motifs and symbols.

 

The basis of Marquetry has its origins in Scandinavian culture. Its purpose was to bring elements from the environment and incorporate them into a durable, folk craft type floor design. It includes the use of stencils, rubber stamps and fine artistic brush work.

 

Marquetry is intended to be used to enhance the beauty of an open wood floor that is typically bare. For optimum decoration, though, the floor is best if nothing rests upon it, including around the perimeter.

 

If such a floor design interests you, try designing a small hallway floor.

 

Now, how: is such a thing accomplished?

 

  1. Design a scale drawing of your concept. Grid paper works well.

 

  1. Refer to your scale drawing.

 

Here’s what you will need to begin:

 

  1. Choose your motifs: a stencil form, or with the addition of rubber stamps.

 

  1. Choose your sheen: matte, semi-gloss, gloss, or a combination.

 

  1. Oil base finishes are recommended. Fine art oils will do.

 

  1. Use a matte shellac for quick sealing.

 

  1. Use a varnish or polyurethane for final finish protection.

 

  1. Use assorted abrasives: #220, #80, wet sandpaper, or emery cloth #400.

 

  1. Also you’ll need rags, tack clothes, mineral spirits, and easy remove masking tape.

 

 

The basic procedures – Finished wood or unfinished-bare wood floor.

 

  1. Measure off. Tape area to be painted or stained. Scuff sand surface with sandpaper.
  2. Paint in corner designs first.
  3. Then work in between placing stencils and stamps at equal measurements from corners and adjacent designs.
  4. Work multiple designs with same color.
  5. If a narrow border design is to be used, run it completely around entire perimeter.
  6. Let dry before doing block designs. Mask accordingly.
  7. When blocks are completed, seal with shellac to protect.
  8. There are four sides; blocks should be duplicated no more than twice per side.
  9. If you have chosen a center motif, measure and tape off perpendicular to the sides. Note: The scale of the motif may be adjusted up to 4 times size of the perimeter block designs.
  10. As an option for creative effect: Stain, pain, and ink can be used simultaneously.
  11. When dry, make sure to seal with shellac each individual block design.
  12. Remove masking tape as necessary; and tack cloth surface.
  13. Once designs are completely dry, lightly sand surfaces.
  14. Apply first coat of clear finish. Let dry over night.
  15. Lightly sand with #220 or #400 sandpaper, depending on overall smoothness of the wood.
  16. Apply second coat of varnish, polyurethane or clear acrylic.
  17. In ten days, apply floor wax (optional). The work is completed.

 

A Marquetry design can be finished in any number of ways. It does not have to be traditional as in Folk Art. If you are doing a child’s room, animals, clowns and rocket ships are excellent choices.

 

If it is a family dining room with a light stain colored finish, try using traditional miniature farm scenes with fruits and vegetables placed in between. A stencil works well because it creates an easy method of producing repeatable designs.

 

And if you choose a contemporary design, try using world symbols as a motif. Vary the colors. A neat trick would then be to apply a varnish with various sheens on different block.

 

In decorating a floor, there are many options available. Some are simpler than others. Choose a design motif that fits your personality, level of skill, budget, and time allotment.

 

Remember: If you cover the design with furniture, you will have defeated the purpose of Marquetry.  That’s one reason it works exceptionally well in hallways.

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Painting It: Things That Can Go Wrong

Following directions, specifications, and recommendations is not a guarantee that you won’t have a problem on the job. The quality of a paint job depends on certain variables such as weather conditions, cleanliness of the surface, exposure to the sun, and amount of foot traffic.

 

Below I will describe two personal scenarios that illustrate exactly what I am talking about.

 

SCENARIO 1: The subject is a never-before painted panelized exterior wall surface made from a ceramic type substrate. The two-foot square tiles have a glazing which is highly polished.

 

Process for Scenario 1

 

1.Problem: Remove smooth glaze.

Solution: Sand surface by using orbital sander with #80 grit abrasive disc.

Result: Surface gloss is removed; good anchor pattern is produced.

 

2. Use recommended primer. Apply two-part epoxy type primer; thin accordingly with Methyl Ethyl Ketone; then spray finish using airless system.

 

3. Let material cure overnight.

 

4. On-site inspection revealed broad paint failure. Paint released from the surface; peeling on more than 80% of the total surface.

 

5. Manufacturer investigated claim. Checked for proper surface preparation and moisture content. Inspection determined that the cause of paint failure was due to primer being incompatible to substrate type. The use of an epoxy primer was refuted by the manufacturer. They said its recommended use was for bare metal surfaces only.

NOTE: The directions called for either that, or a chemically or abrasive etched surface.

 

6. Recommendation: Recondition surface; and apply an exterior alcohol based shellac type product. Finish with desired topcoat.

 

7. The surface withstood the new application; job well done.

 

 

SCENARIO 2:  The surface is a linear bare roof flashing made from aluminum.

 

Process for Scenario 2

 

1. Problem: Paint bare metal flashing.

Solution: Sand surface according to instruction, using #120 grit sandpaper.

Result: Created anchor pattern for paint to adhere to.

 

2.Use recommended oil based primer using brush and roller methods. Let cure overnight.

 

3. Following day inspection revealed total paint failure. One hundred percent of surface peeled and surface had an unexplained oily feel to it.

 

4. Manufacturer inspection ensued. The surface preparation and chosen product were approved. A moisture test was completed, with negative results. The metal was determined to be polished bare aluminum, not compatible with an oil based primer.

 

5. Recommendation: Recondition surface. Sand appropriately with #120 grit sandpaper. Treat with Muriatic acid wash; and rinse with water. When dry, apply thin coat of galvanizing metal primer by brush and roller. Finish with desired topcoat.

 

6. Finished product acceptable; it withstood the scratch test.

 

Adhesion problems to look out for: oily residue on surface, humidity over 72%, dust, alkaline or cracked surface, substrate incompatible with primer or finish material.

 

Methods for correcting adhesion problems: Sand surface with abrasive that corresponds to the surface’s smoothness. Wipe surface with de-glossing agent or high evaporating solvent. Use tack cloths to all but rough surfaces. Paint exterior surfaces on a dry day.

 

It is easy to overlook a step in preparing a surface. If you do that too often, you will be reminded of it when you are least likely to want it.

 

Give preparation the time it deserves. It will pay off in the final product. So will the customer.

 

Rule of thumb: When painting, keep a rag in one pocket and a piece of sandpaper in the other. Believe me, you will need them.

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: How to Paint Difficult Surfaces or Objects

There are different substrates in which paint can be applied. The most problematic are those not typically considered. However, when they are, it would be a good idea to know the proper finish so that the paint job will last. Any paint job, when done correctly, can last indefinitely.

 

The first question is: What types of surfaces are the most difficult to cover? And what are the requirements to produce a durable appearance?

 

But, before any finish is applied, sand the surface with an appropriate grade of sandpaper. Ultra smooth surfaces may not benefit from this.

 

Here is a list for you to consider:

 

  1. Glass – Clean with alcohol. Apply alcohol based primer; top coat with alkyd.
  2. Ceramics – Acid etch. Apply acid based or galvanizing primer; top coat polyurethane.
  3. Plastic – Apply alkyd primer; top coat with urethane.
  4. Rubber – Apply alkyd primer; top coat with alkyd.
  5. Formica – Apply epoxy or urethane primer; top coat with same.
  6. Fiberglass – Apply epoxy or lacquer primer; top coat with epoxy or acrylic enamel.
  7. Copper – Apply acid wash coat; top coat with exterior acrylic latex or oil base.
  8. Aluminum – Apply galvanizing primer; top coat with exterior alkyd.
  9. Brass – Apply acid wash coat; top coat with acrylic enamel.

 

And, of course, the method of application varies with the type of surface. I recommend that, in most circumstances, you use a fine spray finishing procedure. (HVLP preferred)

 

  1. Ultra smooth surfaces – They typically require applying a finish in multiple thin coats, with sanding (wet sand #400) in between each coat and tack cloth to promote a glossy, even surface.

 

  1. Medium smooth surfaces – These usually require mild sanding,(#220-#400) the filling of minor surface flaws with polyester resin, and then painting by thin nap roller (sponge, or mohair).

 

All surfaces listed in 1-9 are considered to be “smooth.” No products with a high viscosity and slow drying time are suitable for the above surface types.

 

Recommended products include: Bulls eye Shellac, Bulls eye alcohol based primer, Gripper latex bonding primer, Bin alcohol based primer, Aqualock primer, Kilz oil primer, Washcoat acid etch primer, Zinc primer, Glidden and Sherwin Williams specialty coatings.

 

Objects come in a variety of shapes, sizes, and designs. Some are for decoration and some are functional. Most of them can be painted in one way or another depending on your interests.

 

For our purposes, let’s look at household items which can be designed and finished for decorative reasons. Here is a list of some items you may want to paint:

 

  1. Electrical outlet cover – Sand cover, using #220 sandpaper. Apply shellac or Kilz primer coat. Top coat with any latex or oil finish desired. Apply multiple thin coats.

 

  1. Table top – If existing finish is clear, sand with #220 or #400 depending on how smooth the top is. Using spray or short nap roller cover, apply satin, semi or gloss polyurethane, varnish or acrylic clear coat. Apply several thin even coats, sanding in between and using tack cloth to remove dust. Paint requires similar application. Sand, fill minor imperfections and apply multiple thin coats.

 

  1. Sculpture – Smooth surface with a Scotch Brite pad or sponge sanding block with a #120- #400 grit. Apply coating by spray, including airbrush for even finish. Alkyd paints are most suitable for opaque finish. Bronze, glazed or metallic finishes may also be applied. Experiment with various tools for different effects.

 

  1. Light fixture – If wood or metal, sand surface with #220-#400 sandpaper. If metal, apply surface adhesion promoter. For optimum finish, apply coating using spray technique. Oil or polyurethanes or urethanes work best.

 

  1. 5. Vase – If glass, treat with alcohol wash. Prime using Gripper product; reduce with alcohol for thinning. Apply finish using spray methods. Airbrush or low CFM spray gun is best. Use oil or urethane and thin for multiple coats.

 

  1. Wooden Box – Sand to desired smoothness using #120-#320 abrasive. Apply oil or acrylic latex primer. Sand surface. Apply finish choice as desired. Stain process involves choosing a semi transparent or solid color stain and applying clear coat (polyurethane) in satin, semi or gloss sheens. There’s a lot of variation here.

 

  1. Candlestick – If metal, follow application for light fixture. Gilding is the most decorative process. Prime accordingly to manufacturer’s directions. Then apply artificial or genuine metallic leaf. Experiment first before trying to complete a finished product.

 

  1. Basket – Typically made of bamboo, it is best to apply a finish with some flexibility. I recommend using an oil primer, than an acrylic latex finish. Use spray method for uniform finish and ease of application.

 

What is most difficult to finish is an object or surface which does not offer a recommended application or does not specify which type of material to use. That’s where a paint failure comes into play. When a surface is peeling or cracking, or has bubbled, we don’t often know how to repair it without making it worse.

 

TOP TIP: Test your technique on a hidden part of the object. Follow all of the instructions as if you were finishing the entire piece.

 

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Painting difficult surfaces or objects can take more patience than talent.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

See: Real Simple’s August 2016 “How to Paint (Just About) Anything”

RealSimple August 2016 Photo

Article Photographs by Christopher Griffith, Prop Styling by Ariana Salvato, Illustrations by Toby Neilan

Real Simple’s August 2016 issue features a 10-page spread, “How to Paint (Just About) Anything.”*

 

Check it out. Whether you’re a professional, card carrying painter/decorator, or a DIY painter.

You may pick up a few new tips, or refresh ones that you haven’t thought about lately.

 

 

 

 

The “How to Paint…” article features:

 

  1. Stunningly clear “Paint tester app (free)” photo, page. 151.
  2. Overview of types of paints, finishes, applications and supplies, and “helpful helpers.”
  3. Capsule-sized instructions on computing prepping and priming quantities needed
  4. 30-second tips on coating trims, ceilings, floors, front doors, and kitchen cabinetry.
  5. Mini-tutorial on “How to Roll the Right Way.”
  6. Quick steps for painting special surfaces such as brick, metal, laminate, ceramic tile.
  7. Quick tips for panting indoor and outdoor furniture.
  8. A few consumer problem and solution scenarios.
  9. Simple, essential steps for cleaning up tools after completing a project.
  10. Direction tips for deciding what to do with leftover paint.

 

The copy is clean, concise and easy-to-read. The layout is easy-to-follow. The full-color photos and illustrations of products, supplies and tools are small, very clear and detailed.

 

“The Paint Experts,” who served as advisors for the article, include:

 

  • Katherine Kay McMillan, coauthor, Do-It-Yourself Painting for Dummies.
  • Carl Minchew, VP/color innovation and design, Benjamin Moore.
  • Chris Richter, Sr. merchant/interior paint, The Home Depot.
  • Lucianna Samu, color and DIY expert, paint educator, Benjamin Moore and Aubuchon Hardware.
  • Brian Santos, “the Wall Wizard,” author and industry expert.
  • Cheri Sparks, owner, A Painting Company, Denver, Colorado.
  • Stephanie Tuliglowski, artist/decorator, Joliet, Illinois.
  • Dustin Van Fleet, interior designer/owner of Funk Living, Tifton, Georgia.
  • Rick Watson, Dir./product information, Sherwin Williams.
  • Debbie Zimmer, spokesperson/Paint Quality Institute, div. of Dow.

 

* Written by Amanda Lecky, Photographs by Christopher Griffith, Prop Styling by Ariana Salvato, Illustrations by Toby Neilan; Pages 148-157. Real Simple: Life Made Easier is published by Time, Inc.; www.RealSimple.com.

 

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Pro painters and decorators tend to learn something new about their craft every day.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob” today.

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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