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Archive for the ‘Outdoor surfaces and areas’ Category

Painting Patterns: Giant Chessboard – Part I

 

Last October, two painters took on a project that they had no business tackling. One, they had less than one year experience in the trade. Two, they were production painters. And, three, they were not detail-oriented.

 

Project: Paint continuous pattern on exterior driveway and courtyard, and interior main hallway.

Dimensions: Driveway: 36 feet wide by 350 feet long; Courtyard: 18 feet wide by 24 feet long. Hallway: 12 feet wide by 220 feet long

 

Pattern/effect: Wood-grain chessboard.

 

Property owner: Amateur chess champion and business entrepreneur.

 

WHAT THE PROJECT REQUIRED

 

  1. Precision measuring: up, down, across.
  2. Precision gridding: linear, horizontal, vertical.
  3. Precision marking: block pattern, no-borders, edge run-offs.
  4. Labeling: Alternating blocks, horizontal and vertical.
  5. Precision cutting in, each paint block.
  6. Prompt, steady fill-in of each block, in gridded order.
  7. Careful matching of correct paint color to correct block.
  8. Frequent paint mixing and stirring: 5-gallon containers; also 1-gallon roller pan filler cans.

 

HOW THE PROJECT GOT MESSED UP

 

  1. Measuring: each surface area’s length and width estimated, not measured; courtyard missed.
  2. Gridding: each area’s axis (center) not located.
  3. Marking: perpendicular lines forming block edges/encasements not marked evenly. Corners not squared. Why: Product failure: Poor quality masking tape failed.
  4. Labeling: Cabernet brown and Sandstone blocks not alternated in certain area. Why: Worker(s) did not pay attention, lost track, got in a hurry.
  5. Cutting in: corners not sharp – not squared/ “L-ed” off. Fuzzy edging. Why: Work speed did not match skill level; wrong brushes used; too much paint on brushes; poor taping. (See C.)
  6. Filling-in: Finish paint surface not smooth. Paint applied unevenly, also too thinly or thickly in spots. Unblended brush stroke edges. Paint-clogged brushes.
  7. Paint-to-block matching: Lost chessboard pattern big time. Note: One block color off messes up entire sequence.
  8. Frequent mixing/stirring to avoid “bumps,” lumps and separation in applied paint. Why: Paint products not strained or filtered before being poured into 1-gallon buckets, paint tray.

 

See: Painting Patterns: Giant Chessboard – Part II.

 

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Champion chess players and devoted decorative painters share a key skill: Patience.

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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Painting Hotels: Creating Curbside Charm

A hotel’s appeal starts in three places: on-line, on-app, and at-the-curb.

 

Its exterior image can attract or deter guests and visitors patronage, loyalty and referrals. It can help position the hotel in the lodging and convention marketplace. It can help establish and sustain its place in the business community.

 

How can the hotel’s painter and decorator create, or enhance, the business’s curbside appeal and image?

 

A FEW CREATIVE AND COST-EFFECTIVE OPTIONS

 

Area: Property’s front-main entrance and gate.

 

Main Entrance Walls: Masonry.

Paint color: Lt. yellow gold. Other examples: Cream 45yy721230, Glidden Exterior semi-gloss; H&C Concrete Solid Color Stain/low-lustre, water-base over previous paint surface. Gates: wrought iron, baked enamel. Color: Black.

 

Project: Paint wall top and edging a color that complements main color used in area.

Paint color: White No. 60yy831094. Glidden’s Heavy-duty exterior semi-gloss masonry paint. Other colors: Egg White No. SW6364, or Tandy Green No. SW 6424, both Sherwin-Williams; H&C Exterior Concrete Color Stain/Sealer. TIP: One coat using heavy duty, premium product.

 

CAUTION: A color that sharply contrasts with area’s predominant color can detract, even cheapen, overall appearance of entire area. Example: Entrance walls: Cream or lt. yellow gold; Trim: Bright or deeper red, Exterior high-gloss paint.

 

Project: Construct “WELCOME” sign. Tap a woodcrafting staff member – in any department – to design and construct sign and posts.

Construction: Use treated exterior wood, such as oak.

Letters: Paint or stain in brightest/darkest hue of hotel’s predominant color scheme color. Examples: Paint color: Dark Lake Blue, 90BG 08/075, or Forest Green 07BG 08/244, both Glidden’s Exterior semi-gloss; Stain: Pine Needle SW3009, Sherwin-Williams.

Sign body and posts: Mask off dry letters. Stain, using ample product. Let penetrate. Wipe with clean, soft cloths. Apply two coats of exterior clear polyurethane to entire sign.

Alternate method: First, stain sign body and posts. Let penetrate. Wipe with clean, soft cloths. Then, paint or stain the letters. Let dry. Last, apply two coats of exterior clear polyurethane. Allow ample dry time between coats.

 

Area: Lobby Entrance Exterior.

 

Project: Paint two park benches in a color that matches a color in hotel’s and lobby’s scheme.

Seats/backs: Paint colors: Real Red SW6868, Radish SW6861, or Positive Red SW 6871, all available in Duration, SuperPaint or Resilience Exterior Acrylic Coatings, Sherwin-Williams; Bright Juniper Green C40, 50GY51/437, or Caribbean Sea B40, 56BG 23/355, Glidden’s.

Product type: Glidden’s Heavy-duty exterior high-gloss enamel.

Bench metal frames/braces: Paint color: Black, Glidden’s or Sherwin-Williams. Product type: Rust-proof, fade-proof heavy-duty metal/steel paint.

Finish coat entire bench: One or two coats of exterior heavy-duty clear coat to all surfaces. NOTE: Finish back and underside of bench.

 

Project: Where’s your mascot? A life-size model belongs at the lobby entrance doors. Freshly painted or stained, and clear-coated.

 

Areas: Guest Building Exteriors.

 

Project: Use color scheme that matches front entrance colors that match hotel’s color scheme.

Main color: Light hue of predominant color. Accent color: darker shade in same family.

Alternate color: Darker shade of predominant color. Accent/trim color: light hue of same color.

Alternate: Light hue of predominant color. Accent color: Comparable hue, complementary color.

COLOR TIP: Softer hues invite rest and relaxation, particularly in blues and greens.

 

Areas/Surfaces: Exterior Signage Around Buildings.

 

Project: Natural wood signs, that identify indigenous plants, flowers, trees.

Treated new wood: Spray or brush clear stain/sealer onto entire wood area of signs. Wipe dry. Letters/numbers: Hand paint if smaller; spray if larger. One coat fine with premium product. Color idea: Dark shade of darkest color in hotel’s color scheme. Finish coat: Spray entire sign with two finish coats of exterior, heavy-duty clear coating for wood signage.

 

Project: Wood – painted signs.

Used wood: Clean, wash and sand all surfaces. Prime entire sign and posts. TIP: Spray can primer works great here. Retain light, short spray motions to avoid runs, splotches, corner globs. Letters/numbers: Hand or spray paint. Color idea: Dark shade of darkest color scheme color.

For contrast: If letters/numbers are raised, hand paint sides with contrasting color. Steady hand!

Finish coat: Spray entire sign with two coats of exterior heavy-duty semi-gloss latex or enamel. For contrast: Paint outer edges of entire sign in paint color used for letters/numbers.

DURABILITY TIP: Avoid bright yellows, reds, purples that tend to fade faster.

 

Areas: Walkways Between Buildings.

 

Project: “Park-a-Bench”®* along every walkway. More than one is ideal.

TIP: Place a bench along every stretch, between each cross-walk. (* Registration pending: RDH.)

 

A painter friend at a South Florida hotel spearheaded a staff “Paint-a-Bench”® workshop.

 

What they did: “Crew” repaired and refinished used park benches located on the property. Also, some staff members got “donations” of unused, unwanted benches from neighboring hotels.

What colors they used: Each park bench was painted in a color that matched or complemented the hotel’s overall color scheme. Protective finish: Two coats, exterior heavy-duty clear coat.

Personal touch: Each park bench was named after an ocean mammal or fish.

How long it took: Period of three months, each “team” completed two or three benches.

Who paid for what: Hotel’s property management company paid for the paint primers and finish products, also thinners and cleaners. A local contractor donated a supply of sandpaper and gently used brushes and rollers. The hotel’s G.M. donated the rolls of plastic sheeting/drop cloths.

 

COLOR TIP:  Brights excite. Hues subdue.

 

Thanks to some creative, visionary and  practical G.Ms. and property owners, I’ve had the honor to execute each of the projects suggested here. Each project varied from the overview offered in this post. Much more “creative license” was expected and built into the process. The results: Aesthetically alluring, “amenities” in their own right, and value-adding.

 

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Sometimes, stepping out-of-the-box is the best way to keep in step

with your global community.

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Stay safe, everyone. And, thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: The Driveway

Do you have a driveway? Probably, you drive over it nearly every day. The front of your house is beautiful, and your landscaping has a well-sculptured look.

 

But, your driveway? Well, it collects dirt well, and has some nice cracks.

 

There is a way to change your driveway’s appearance. And you can create a durable finish which will last for years.

 

Are you considering a face lift for your driveway?

 

Follow these steps to aid you in the process.

 

1. “Pressure wash” and clean the driveway’s entire surface with a 50-50 bleach and water solution.  Thoroughly rinse the area. Then let it dry.

 

2. Repair cracks and small holes with concrete patching compound. Let cure over night.

 

3. Spray the surface with Muriatic Acid. Then, brush vigorously to etch the concrete. Rinse the entire surface. Let dry.

 

4. On a dry day with low humidity, apply your selected paint using both a brush and roller. Apply in “one direction”. Let dry 8-24 hours.

 

5. Apply a second coat of paint. This time, roll the material on in the “opposite direction” used the day before. Let the finish dry 24 hours, or until the paint is hard. Test with finger nail, or a coin (preferred).

 

6. For added protection and durability, apply a clear coat finish. Select one which is compatible with the color paint coats. This, too, can be applied in multiple coats, if preferred.

 

A CREATIVE TIP

In addition to painting the surface, also consider using some type of stenciled pattern. To do so, first design a drawing. In it, show the exact details that you wish to incorporate into your driveway.

 

CHOOSING YOUR COATINGS

 

A select number of specialized products are available for coating driveways, and related areas. The price may vary anywhere from $30.00 to $50.00 a gallon, or more.

 

1. Concrete sealer.

— Applied before any finish coating.

Approximate cost: $41.00 a gallon. Sherwin-Williams.

 

2. Exterior oil based paint.

— Recommended for walkways and concrete steps.

— Advantages: the most affordable, easy to work with.

Approximate cost: $22.00 a gallon.

 

3. “Catalyzed” finishing product.

— A few optimum examples: Urethane, Polyurethane, or Epoxy.

— Advantages: Exterior durability, extremely hard finishes, hold up well when exposed to moisture and the sun’s rays.

— Added advantage: They can be pressure washed without peeling the paint from the surface.

Approximate cost: $30.00-$50.00 a gallon, or more.

 

4. Acrylic resin.*

— Water-based.*

— Resistant to environmental elements.*

— Durable, dries fast -Area can be “useable” in 60-90 minutes.*

— Available in many colors and tints.*

TIP: Stick with top coating manufacturers when selecting this product.

— Approximate cost: $49.99-$65.00 a gallon, or more.

 

* IMPORTANT NOTE: Acrylic resin is a newer coating product.

— It has some great potential!

— It still has to prove itself.

— Claims by all manufacturers should be weighed carefully.

— Choose this type product, over others, as an experienced and informed professional application specialist – or DIY-er.

 

THREE KEYS TO RETAINING A BEAUTIFULLY PAINTED DRIVEWAY

 

1. Regularly, clean the driveway’s entire surface.

 

2. Lay down one or more dropcloths before you service a vehicle, paint a bike, refinish furniture, etc.

 

3. Don’t squeal those tires!

 

Remember: First impressions can start outside of your front door. At your driveway!

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: How to Stain a Wood Deck

Does the deck resemble a collection of mold-ridden, fungus-laden, algae-slick growths?

Then, you will know it’s been “neglected” way too long.

 

As long as the wood hasn’t rotted, there is still hope for improvement.

 

The easiest and first thing to do: Clean the surface.

1. Use a garden sprayer, containing a solution of detergent, bleach and water.

2. Spray the entire deck area.

3. Let set for 15-20 minutes.

4. Then pressure wash the deck.

 

TIP: The deck may look acceptable once it’s been cleaned. Carefully inspect the entire surface. In full daylight!

 

Does the deck surface still look dirty, unkempt and unsanitary? A good coat of stain will cure that unsightly appearance.

 

STAIN PRODUCTS TO USE

 

To carry out your project, consider using one of the following products. Both are oil-based stains.

1. Solid color Stain – simulates a painted surface.

2. Semi-transparent Stain – accentuates the depth of the wood’s grain pattern.

 

Once the stain is selected, the actual process can begin. Here are basic steps to finish any size deck.

 

HOW TO PREP THE AREA

 

1. Remove all moveable objects: vehicles, bikes, skate boards, furniture, planters, etc.

2. Securely cover all adjacent and accessible areas.

A. To use a brush and roller: Cover nearby vegetation and concrete with drop cloths or plastic sheeting.

B. For spraying the stain: Be prepared to cover considerably more.

—Mask off the wall area adjacent to the house/building, where the deck is fastened.

—Mask everything else nearby that can’t be moved: all plants and holders, open ground and landscaping, stationary furniture, statues, fencing, gutters/downspouts, etc.

C. Is everything covered that needs to be? Now, cover yourself.

—If you intend to spray, wear a disposable paper suit. Cover your head.

—Put on safety glasses/goggles.

—Gloves are a must as well.

 

HOW TO APPLY THE STAIN

 

1. Stain all hand rails, toe kicks and stair runners.

A. Apply as heavy and even of a coat as you can. Avoid producing runs in the stain.

B. The wood hasn’t been done in a while. So, it will soak up the stain fairly quickly.

C. TIP: After staining, exterior wood does not need to be wiped down.

 

2. Need to apply a second coat?

A. WAIT until the stain has penetrated enough.

B. It does not have to be completely dry for you to recoat the surface.

C. It may require two days to dry.

 

3. Stain the deck and steps last.

A. TIP: Since the surface is flat, the stain can be applied more heavily.

B. Generally, apply the stain in the direction of the wood planking.

C. Spraying on the stain is the quickest and easiest method.

—Using a brush and roller requires a lot more time and effort.

D. Don’t pay a lot of attention to staining in between the gaps of the wood.

Exception: Gaps are wide enough for you to apply stain on the wood surfaces bordering them.

 

WHEN TO APPLY THE STAIN

 

1. Remember: The deck wood must be as dry as possible.

 

2. Stain on a warm, dry day. This ensures that the stain gets the best penetration into the wood.

 

3. Avoid staining when the humidity is high, or detectable rain clouds are in the sky.

 

Follow these steps. Add on another year before your next application. Save precious time and money.

 

ADD LIFE, APPEAL, USE, and VALUE TO YOUR DECK! AND, TO YOUR OUTDOOR LIFE!

 

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Enjoy your outdoors. Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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