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Changes and Advancements in Hotel/Facility Painting, Part 3: Supplies, Tools and Equipment

Introduction

 
The standard types of painting tools and equipment will always be in use, as long as the paint products go unchanged in how they are applied. Paint spray equipment applications are not to be replaced. They are only approved upon by making subtle changes to spray guns and paint pumping systems.

When it relates to the roller cover, its design is continually being re-examined for ways to improve its performance, primarily with new materials. Widely used tools and equipment are difficult to replace. Changes in supplies mean costly changes to a system which is already operating efficiently.

 

  1. Changes and Advancements in Supplies:

A. Abrasives, caulking, patching compounds, masking materials, and other items. Changes: meet the demands of structural components and newer surfaces, also environmental changes.

B. Sanding products produced for wet or dry use. Option: Abrasives affixed to a sponge type substrate, allowing greater flexibility.

C. Caulking produced as waterborne and siliconized. Advantages: Resist cracking, and provide waterproofing, while allowing the surface to be painted.

D. Patching compounds that dry faster and harder. Advantages: sand easier, allow painting sooner.

E. Masking tapes designed to be left on the surface longer. Advantages: Do not pull the surface loose, and make re-taping unnecessary.

 

Comments about Supplies:

Commonly used supplies have advanced little. They tend to fulfill the need, in an efficient manner, for which they have been designed.

The quality of supplies must not be overlooked. They are your aid in producing a quality painting or finishing job. They sure can make it easier. By the way, a poorly adhering masking tape is not going to do you any favors.

 

  1. Changes and Advancements in Tools:

A. More paint brushes designed for applying multiple types of coating. Brush hairs are a composite of nylon, polyester, olefin, and other synthetic fibers.

B. Roller frames designed to reduce the friction of the roller covers. Added feature: control the covers from slipping off of the roller frames.

C. Roller covers, with new developments in nap composition. Advantages: Optimal nap composition which lasts longer, and is durable with various coatings.

D. Advancements that consider the ergonomics of a tool’s use. Example: Joint knife, which must be very strong and flexible. It must provide an excellent grip and balance for effective use.

 

Comments about Tools:

Advancements in tools are needed, especially when a product or material has no way of being applied. A tool must be designed, tested, fabricated, and marketed to industry, business and public consumers.

 

  1. Changes and Advancements in Equipment:

 A. Fine finishing, hand-held and airless portable spray system. Designed for ease of use by the professional painter and finisher. Homeowner/general consumer models: easier to operate, clean, and maintain.

B. Masking machines that are easy to manipulate in taping procedures. Normally for commercial, residential and automotive painting.

C. Spray pumps designed for easier use by the homeowner/general consumer market. Features: lighter weight, easy to set up, simple to clean up. Pressure fluid: maintained electronically.

 

Comments about Equipment:

Changes in equipment occur when use and testing point to an area of design which can be improved. I consider advancements, something which really alters the marketing of a piece of equipment.
What marks a more advanced piece of equipment? Some key features: greater performance, more energy efficient, more ergonomics, and increased durability.

 

Closing Comments about Painting Supplies, Tools and Equipment:

A successful painting project requires that all intended and needed supplies, tools and equipment are available, reliable and qualitative. Consistently, they must help the painter to (1) produce above-standard workmanship, (2) achieve satisfactory-plus results, and (3) ensure cost-effective durability.

 

PAINTER’S TIPS: Wisely choose each supply, tool and piece of equipment. Then, care and maintain each one properly. Maximize its potential usefulness and effectiveness on future projects, work orders and tasks. You’ll be glad that you did.

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Even the most advanced supply, tool, or piece of equipment is only as effective as the painter using it.

Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2014, 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s World: What You May Not Know About Black Mold

Never believe something cannot harm you just because you can’t see it. Just as a virus or bacteria can cause an infection, Black Mold fungi, offers its own type of threat to your health.

 

Basically, anything which is microscopic and exhibits the definition of being alive supports its own defense mechanism. And that’s against us.

 

Black Mold, or other similar fungi, produces spores which are unseen to the naked eye. During the stages of their metabolism, they produce by-products which are often toxic. These toxins interfere with the normal metabolism and respiration of humans.

 

WHAT YOU MAY NOT KNOW ABOUT BLACK MOLD

 

I didn’t know much about Fungi, Black Mold, Myotoxins, etc. until I started looking into it further. The following is a list of three of the most dangerous effects from mold exposure:

 

1. Mold inhalation – Decreased hemoglobin red blood cell concentration, lowered blood gas concentration, anemia, and bronchial and/or sinus inflammation and infection.

 Symptoms: Dizziness, muscle spasms-tremors, headaches, stressed breathing, clamped oxygen supply, runny nose, burning eyes, confusion, and blurred vision.

 

2. Mold Skin Contact AbsorptionAnemia, change in basal respiration rate, lowered blood gas concentration, subcutaneous pustules, lesions, and widespread rash.

Symptoms: Skin irritation, itching, burning, dizziness.

 

3. Long-Term Effects (most important) -Prolonged exposure that often causes an irreversible anemic health condition. Stem cell differentiation development within the bone marrow that’s affected by cases severe mold exposure. Change in the Hemostasis of hemoglobin/red cell relationship is altered.

***Secondary effects – Permanent respiratory illnesses such as chronic and/or acute Sinusitis, Bronchitis, Asthma, and Sinus tract cysts; irritation and/or inflammation of the mucus membranes. Also partial obstruction of the airway. Because of past exposure, susceptibility to allergic reactions from common dust and pollen.

 

HEALTH PREVENTION OF MOLD EXPOSURE

 

1. When cleaning: Wear protective suit, gloves and head covering; also proper respiratory equipment such as a charcoal, organic vapor respirator, or a self-contained, fresh air supply system. Note: Dust mask is totally inadequate.

2. If infestation is invasive: Use garden sprayer with 50/50 bleach-water, or peroxide solution. Spray infected area. Promptly remove yourself from the area until the solution has degraded the mold. Then you may clean and remove by hand what is left. When the removal of mold is completed, rinse entire area with fresh water – either by hand or with a garden sprayer.

3. Ventilate! Ventilate! Ventilate! In the area where you’re working, always provide adequate ventilation when spraying bleach or similar toxic chemicals. Open windows. And use circulating fans. The cleaning process will be much safer, and go much smoother.

 

IF AND WHEN YOU’RE EXPOSED TO MOLD…

 

1. Seek a clean, fresh air environment as soon as possible. Go outside if necessary.

2. Get help now! Someone needs to assist you and call “Emergency 911” and “Poison Control” – your chief engineer,  security director, member of management, teammate.

3. If you suffer a rash or burn of any kind, use a baking soda/water solution, calamine lotion, or a hygienic glycerol soap to help reduce skin irritation.

4. In severe cases, it may be necessary to get a steroid injection. This depends on whether or not your entire body is affected.

 

IN THE CASE OF MOLD EXPOSURE…

…what you don’t know will hurt you.

 

1. I developed both chronic and acute sinusitis from daily exposure to massive amounts of toxic levels of mold plus the toxic cleaning agents, over a period of six years.

2. On a daily basis, I took the proper precautions. I used the products and safety tools and equipment provided and authorized by the chief engineer, and property management and owners.

3. But the amount of mold was too great, for too long of a time.  According to health and environmental specialists, “a person could not have come out of it without suffering ill effects.”

4. The physicians have said I was fortunate. A strong majority of persons develop Asthma. In addition, a large number are also diagnosed, eventually, with Sinus and Bronchial Cancer, and/or Lung Cancer.

 

WHEN TREATING MOLD…

Whether at home or on the job, take your time. And work safely.

Take care of yourself and the others around you.

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Everyone wants to go home at the end of the day!

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s World: MEET ZACHARY

A True Hotel Holiday Tale…

 

At first, I thought the teen might have had a problem with depression. He sat on a nearby bench, doubled over. Just staring into the ground.

 

But depression turned out not to be what was weighing down this kid.

 

His name was Zachary. He was visiting Walt Disney World with his parents and grandparents. It was his nineteenth birthday. And evidently, one year ago, on December 24, he’d lost his little brother, Matt, to brain cancer.

 

“Matty was only nine,” the teenage guest told me.

 

We continued to chat as I clear-coated the span of wood railing.  Zachary said that his only sibling had had “a rough time” from the start.

 

“Matty was born with a hole in his heart.” Then the child was only five when he started to complain of “feeling whoozie” and “having pain inside” his head.

 

Zachary said that he felt guilty for being alive. And, with no problems at all.

 

Eventually, I ran out of railing to finish coat. And, I needed to move on to the next project on my list.

 

That afternoon, Zachary showed up again. I was repainting a large built-in seat in a rest area. The teen watched intently. He appeared to be much calmer.

 

“How do you do that?” he asked.

 

“Do what?”

 

“Maneuver that brush that way? Really radical.”

 

“Radical? Like in…?” I asked.

 

“Like in neat. Cool.” He hesitated. “I’d like to learn how to do that.”

 

“Step up. I’d be glad to show you.”

 

It was completely against policy. Letting a hotel guest be in a “fresh paint zone.” Letting a guest – a kid – handle any of our word tools, or use any paint product.

 

Probably, I could have gotten fired on the spot if my chief engineer would have come along. But, this kid – practically an adult – reminded me of someone else when he’d been grieving. Me – for my father.

 

Zachary stepped forward. I handed him a second two-inch angled paint brush, dipped in a little Forest Green paint.

 

“Closely watch my hand. It’s all in the wrist.”

 

The teen guest watched, then tried to mimic my wrist-hand movement. On the third try, he got the basic idea. A smile of satisfaction crossed his face.

 

“Matty loved to paint. I bought him an artist kit – you know, one of those sets in a metal box? The Christmas before… His last Christmas with us.”

 

The teen’s look dropped again. Like when I first spotted him that morning. I needed to do – to say – something.

 

“When my dad died suddenly, I thought I’d never paint again.” I told Zachary that my dad and I had worked together. “That made it extra hard,” I acknowledged.

 

I told the teen how one day I looked at Dad’s brushes. I picked up one of them. “And, you know what? That heavy feeling in my heart? It just sort of got a little better.”

 

The teen guest looked at me. He handed my brush back. And, he started to walk away. He turned back.

 

“I just remembered: I brought Matty’s artist kit along in my luggage.”

 

Zachary was going to be all right. At least for now, perhaps he had a way to make some sense of the whole thing. And, be able to enjoy the holidays with his parents, and grandparents – in their eighties.

 

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Take note. Heads up. Every guest… every coworker… could use a little boost.

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A year’s worth of thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting Them: Hostels for Youth and Young Adults

In January of 2017, I will, for the first time, meet a third cousin from Rotterdam in the Netherlands. Frederich III is a professeur of microbiologie. He and five others have been invited to the United States to present papers on the impact of environmental changes upon our health.

 

Fred has two sons. They operate a large guest hostel located in a coastal city.

 

They employ a painter part-time. One of his jobs involves supervising youth and young adult “stay-overs,” who want to earn part of their room rates by doing some painting at the hostel.

 

Few of these young people have ever picked up a paint brush. Except, perhaps, an artist brush. So they do not know their capabilities in this area. Until they put a brush in one of their hands.

 

To make their possibly first painting experience a positive one, the hostel painter works them in pairs. Then, he lets them select, from a duty list, the small painting project they want to take on.

 

Most projects involve interior surfaces and areas. Repainting of the drywall parts of the ceilings, supported by huge rough-sawn beams. Filling, sanding and re-varnishing of the paneled walls in most sleeping rooms. Patching, sanding and refinishing of the hardwood floors, located throughout structure.

 

One of the biggest challenges is the repainting or refinishing of all surfaces in all public areas and “pass-through” corridors, as well as the miles and miles of dark oak stairs, railings, banisters, and trims. There’s a steady flow of traffic in and out of every area – 24 hours, seven days a week.

 

To help solve that problem and make it easier for the young guests to get the painting done, Fred’s boys developed a rotation system. Different two-person crews would be available to do painting at different times of the day or night. Translation: whenever a room or area became vacant for even a few hours.

 

Considering that most of the persons doing the work are novices – new to the craft, Fred says it’s been amazing to see how effective the system works. And, how qualitative the painting results have been.

 

“What about the outside?” I e-mailed Fred.

 

He said that the colder climate limits the exterior work that these young people are able to do. A few always come along, willing to put up with the elements while beautifying the outside of the building.

 

Four questions that will be answered later this month, with the help of the co-owners of the hostel.

 

1. How do the products used differ from those used in the U.S.?

2. How do the techniques or methods differ?

3. How do the average costs differ from those incurred in the U.S.?

4. How do the youth and young adult “painters” feel about the results they produce?

 

Fred, a silent partner in the hostel enterprise, already responded to Question 4. “They’re in surprise. Also, they express gratefulness for making some money to help pay for traveling expenses…”

 

Employing young hostel guests is not a new concept. Hostel operators around the world have,, for many years, employed them to work in the kitchen, restaurant/dining area and laundry. Employing them to handle repair and painting tasks and work orders is a newer pursuit.

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Travelers at any age can work their way to their destinations.

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Travel safe, travel well. Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: Accent Colors Change Appearance and Enhance Amenities

Every four years, a small chain of London area boutique hotels changes its color on the accent wall in each guest room. The owners believe that their clientele, largely repeat visitors, appreciate this gesture.

 

“They like the uplift,” emailed the company’s senior painter. “We are careful to select a color that is just coming into vogue.”

 

For 2017, the hotels’ owners have authorized their (three) staff painters to also apply the new accent color to the vanity alcove and nearby walk-in closet in each room. “This blends the different areas together…” the painter added.

 

The guest reviews have been very positive. Examples: “Lovely effect when entering bath area.”  “Most inviting color unity.”  “Pleasant add-on.”  “Delightful change.”

 

The senior painter ended his e-mail by saying, “I recommend the accent wall for any room or area. It enhances appearance and updates the décor at minimal cost…”

 

 

10 ADVANTAGES TO ADDING ACCENT COLORS TO DÉCOR

 

  1. It changes the overall appearance of the specific area, and entire room.
  2. It changes the overall “feel” of the room.
  3. It freshens the overall look of the entire room or suite.
  4. It enhances the benefits of the standard amenities in the room or area.
  5. It upgrades the overall design of the room or suite.
  6. It updates the color scheme in the room or suite.
  7. It expands the standard color scheme’s customer/guest appeal.
  8. It expands the area’s marketability.
  9. It offers positive visual change at a marginal cost.
  10. It offers a way to use up premium paint in colors no longer a part of color scheme.

 

 

10 UNIQUE APPLICATION TIPS FOR USING ACCENT COLORS

 

  1. Reverse the “apply accent color to the wall” rule. Apply the accent color to the trim, doors and frames, and window sills located on one wall.
  2. Spray paint the ceiling in the new accent color.
  3. Use accent color to faux finish a 3-inch border around the parameter of the ceiling.
  4. Create a vertical stripe effect by alternatively painting the accent color every 2 or 3 inches over the wall’s existing color.
  5. Create a drop ceiling effect by applying accent color in a 3 inch border around ceiling, then down 3 inches at the top of all four walls.
  6. Paint accent color on the worst-condition wall and/or trim surfaces in a room.
  7. Paint accent color adjacent to the surface in the worst condition – eg. dents, poorly matched to touch-ups, gouges, minor water damage.
  8. Hardwood and/or tile floors? Paint “pathway” from inside entry doorway all the way to the bathroom’s tub area. Note: A clear over coat may be advisable.
  9. Create draped canopy effect on bed wall by painting accent color in alternate space, from marked vertical center.
  10. Paint 3-inch block border around one wall in room, painting alternate blocks in accent color.

 

You get the picture. When it comes to applying accent paint colors, your options are wide open!

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s World: Visiting Old Projects, Old Properties

It can be very interesting, and motivating, to visit hotel, resort and other properties where you’ve completed projects in the past. Or where you were a staff painter.

 

You may look at your previous project work through different eyes. The eyes of more experience. This is particularly true with completed projects. Or, similar projects on which you used better products or more effective methods, and achieved better results than before.

 

Two of my friends from IUPAT days have turned this experience into a “painter’s” destination. They stay as guests at a hotel or resort on which they’ve worked. They reserve a large room for a minimum of a 3-day weekend, to a maximum of ten days.  (Depending on the amount of work they did on the respective property.)

 

Here’s what they look at while staying at each hotel or resort.

 

  1. Current overall color scheme of hotel/resort – predominant colors used and where.
  2. Surfaces/areas repainted or redecorated since they worked on property – including products and colors used.
  3. Surfaces/areas that have not been redone since they worked on them – including products and colors they used.
  4. Special designs, finishes and effects used now, that weren’t used back then. Changes made that painter recommended before, but management turned down.
  5. New designs, products, finishes, colors, etc. used now that are much more appealing and effective than those the painter(s) needed to use when there.
  6. Areas and amenities remodeled or upgraded since they worked on the property – including paint, finishing and wallcovering treatments used.

 

Actually, their destination checklist number over eleven. Also, within twenty-four hours of their arrival at the hotel or resort, they made a point of introducing themselves to the chief engineer, also the general manager of the property.

 

“We keep everything above board. We tell them who we are, and why we’re there. Besides the overnight stay, of course.  We tell them that we are painters, what we do specifically, and when we worked on the property, or as a staff member.”

 

They ask permission to walk around, and look at areas that they worked on. They make notes about problem surfaces and projects back when, and the better ways they would handle them today.

 

The two painters – with 56 years hospitality painting experience between them – have developed their own learning curve. They’ve created and produced DVD tutorials – problem-solution how-tos – to share with other career hotel/resort painters and engineering department teammates.

 

Hats off to Trent and Carlos.

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Learning from our past often requires awareness of our presence.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s World: Lars, Luxury Home Painter – Chicago Style

Lars lives in a 3-story walk-up (no elevator) apartment building off West Grand Boulevard, in northwest Chicago. He paints and also installs wallpapers in luxury “owner” apartments and condominiums on the in the North Shore and northeast side neighborhoods overlooking Lake Michigan.

 

On the average, he works on the same residence for seven to eight full days at a time. When one of the properties is sold, he is usually the first painter that the new owners contact to redecorate the home to their specifications.

 

These redecorating projects fall into three levels of work.

 

1. Minimal redecorating. Repainting one or two rooms (often the living room and master bedroom); touching up painting throughout the home. Owner involvement: Owner/client is minimally involved during the work. Approximate completion time: 1 to 3 days.

 

2. Some redecorating. New painting often needs to encorporate new owner’s color preferences into existing color scheme. Requires repainting of front hallway; main living, dining and entertainment areas, bedrooms and bathrooms. Owner involvement: Owner checks in on project fairly regularly. Approximate completion time: 7 to 10 days.

 

3. Remodeling & redecorating. He works under project contractor, based on the architect’s and interior designer’s plans. Entails extensive surface prepping, following new color scheme and applying paint, special finishes and wallcoverings, also detail work. Owner involvement: Very little directly with painter and other craftspersons. Approximate completion time: 1 to 6 months.

 

PROJECT COSTS:

 

NOTE: Labor costs for Level one and two are figured at a materials plus hourly labor rate. Level three are figured on a three-part project basis: (1) materials, supplies; (2) repairs and prep work; and (3) finish work.

 

1. Projects-Level one. Materials and supplies: Lars asks the owner to pay out front for all. Or, the owner gives him a cashier’s check or money order to purchase what he needs. Labor: Owner pays one-half out front, and one-half at completion.

 

2. Projects-Level two. Property owner and Lars sign 2-page agreement, which includes the approximate itemized cost for project. Materials, supplies, equipment rental: Property owner pays Lars out front. Labor: Owner pays one-third before work begins, one-third half-way through project, one-third upon inspection and completion.

 

3. Projects-Level three. Lars signs contract agreement with project contractor, that bonds Lars. Materials and supplies, special tools, equipment rental: Lars receives debit card or access to special checking account, and purchases everything he needs out front and as needed.

Labor: Lars, like all tradespersons on project, receives “project employee” pay check on bi-weekly basis. Craftsman bonus: Upon completion and final inspections, Lars receives a bonus check, if his work is rated at A or A-plus level. That means premium craftsmanship, coming in before his deadline, and under painting and decorating budget.

 

NOTE: Lars’s bonuses are never based on the productivity level of other tradespersons on the project. They do, however, take into account the quality of the finished work of everyone on the project. Thus, Lars and the different tradespersons have an added incentive to work together, consistently, toward achieving high-end results!

 

By the way, Lars worked as an IUPAT/IBPAT painter for over fourteen years. He moved, got caught in the union’s new vested hours rule determination, and lost all fourteen years of his vested worked hours toward pension.

 

So, in late 2002, he struck out on his own. He became a one-man paintshop. Plus, he farms himself out on larger projects.

 

He says that he has never regretted the switch. “During rough times, I’ve had to take on temporary staff painting jobs with hotels and resorts… Also, I’ve worked for a non-union contractor on and off, installing wallcoverings.”

 

With a Dutch twinkle in his eyes, he adds, “I do what all professional painters do. What is necessary…what makes sense.”

 

Right you are, Lars.

 

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CONGRATULATIONS and a big “thank you” to our Chicago Cubs for  winning the 2017 World Series. We’re all very proud of you.

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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