Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

You may not have much time to get the paintshop back in shape, after a hurricane, or another type of disaster, passes or weakens. In fact, you may need to work that job around the recovery property tasks that you must help others get done throughout the property.

Here are tips on what you might need to get ready right away, or as soon as possible.

ESSENTIAL MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES

1. Throw-away sponges, non-porous buckets, long rubber gloves, face masks.
2. Disposable plastic sheeting, 2-4 ML, duct tape, tarp clasps.
3. Scented bleach – to minimize lingering odors.
4. Non-toxic commercial fungal mold remediation solution, hydrogen peroxide.
5. Fillers, caulking, masonry patch, polyester filler.
6. Sandpaper – assorted counts, steel wool.
7. Interior latex paint – main base colors used on property, exterior latex or oil-base paints.
8. Glues, carpet tile adhesive and tape, mortar mix.
9. Paper towels, clean throw-away rags.
10. Other: Hygienic hand wipes, dust masks; texture for repairs.

ESSENTIAL TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT

1. Scrapers, putty knives, wire brushes.
2. Paintbrushes: 1 ½, 2, 3, and 4-inches; cutting in brush. China bristles and nylon/polyester.
3. Paint rollers and covers: 9-inch x ¼-inch, 3/8-inch, ½-inch, 1 ½-inch.
4. Pressure washer, rubber boots, water exposure gear.
5. Organic vapor respirator
6. Gas compressor..


ESSENTIAL SKILLS AND SERVICES
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The lady walked toward her vehicle in Home Depot’s parking lot. In one hand, she grasped two, 1-gallon cans of Glidden’s Interior Latex Paint. In the other, she held onto a 2-inch Purdy paintbrush, a 6-inch paint roller with cover and an orange combination paint tray and screen.

It was one day after Hurricane Irma, and the tornadoes that it had spawned, had whipped through Central Florida.

When a major disaster hits – eg. hurricane, tropical storm, tornado – painting should be one of the last things on your immediate agenda.

HOTEL/FACILITY PAINTER’S TOP TEN PRIORITIES

1. Help your chief engineer check out all systems that are under the department’s charge – eg. mechanical, electrical, plumbing.

2. As part of the engineering team: (a) assess each building’s condition, interior and exterior; (b) identify problem areas; (c) determine which problems to resolve a.s.a.p., and, (d) decide how to handle each of them promptly and safely.

3. As part of the engineering team, get the department back in shape, so that all of you can do the major recovery and repair tasks and projects as efficiently as possible.

4. As part of the engineering team, help implement the plan to (a) make repairs and (b) get everything up and running again in a timely, safe and cost-effective manner.

5. Assist groundspersons in clearing away all broken trees, limbs and branches and brush; also dismantled lumber, metal, piping; debris, garbage, etc. This includes clearing main traffic areas.

6. Help repair and replace all crucial lighting – especially front entrance, parking, walkways, corridors, lobby, public restrooms. Also repair main walkways, as soon as possible.

7. Assist other departments, as necessary, to get their areas up and running again.

8. Assist chief engineer in working with utility companies, outside contractors, repair services, etc. to get property systems and amenities, and business operations back in working order.

9. Between efforts to help others, start to get your paintshop back in shape. HINT: Try to unpack, then set up what you’ll need to use first.

10. When your chief engineer gives the go-ahead, concentrate your efforts on reorganizing the paintshop so that you can get back to your painting job.

By the way, it can be tempting to ignore the engineering department’s big job during this very disorganized and stressful time. You might be tempted to hide in your area. Do not do it!

This is one instance when painting will be lower on the list of everyone’s priorities.

At the top of every staff member’s and department’s disaster recovery list needs to be:

1. people
2. property
3. business
4. “neighborhood”

This is one time when, both now and later, you’ll be glad that you helped others first.

See: “Painting It: Disaster Recovery, Part 2: Paintshop Priorities.”
See: “Painting It: Disaster Recovery, Part 3: When Painting Is Not Enough.”

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Thank you for doing your best job every day. Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”
Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Periodically, my mother’s interior design class toured Chicago area properties.

On one, day-long tour, they visited three luxury homes that set on Evanston’s high bluffs overlooking Lake Michigan.

One home featured fine examples of classic contemporary design: simple lines, solid colors, smooth finishes, subtle textures, geometric patterns, and sleek woods, tiles, glass, and chrome.

From its trimly landscaped and broadly sweeping circle driveway, to the double set of solid red lacquer front doors, to the nine-foot main hallway that trailed through the house, to the four glass doors at the rear, that overlooked the lake.

The sprawling, one-story structure suited its owners: a concert pianist and conductor, and his wife, an artist and author.

The music room stood out. Its two most striking amenities: the magnificent black lacquer Steinway concert piano and the 12-inch square, black and white marble tiles that covered the floor.

Features also included the following:

1. dome ceiling with a huge globular skylight;
2. solid black marble fireplace;
3. two walls lined with white-enameled bookcases, stuffed with books, bound volumes of sheet music, also wood and ivory artifacts;
4. couches and easy chairs upholstered in matching white-on-white striped damask.

All of the other sixteen rooms featured equally elegant, yet comfortable appointments. It was a home that clearly represented the personalities of the owners, and met their needs perfectly.

Shortly before the design school students’ visit, the owners had decided to retire in that house. And, they’d put their South Florida home up for sale.

Nearly twenty years after touring that home, my mother was led into the luxury apartment of a former opera star, Adeline Arrigo. Interestingly, she had performed with the concert pianist on philharmonic stages throughout the United States, Canada and Europe.

Madame Arrigo resided on the second story of a red brick, three-story walk-up built in the early 1900s by her husband’s Sicilian family. The South Racine Avenue building, located on the southeast side of Chicago, set across the street from University of Illinois’s Chicago campus. And, the three-story building had five large apartments – all occupied by “Arrigos.”

The focal points of the two bedroom apartment were the portraits of Adeline and her husband, the late Victor Arrigo. On every wall, every shelf and every table top were representations of the owners famous lives. Adeline, the opera star. Victor, the Illinois statesman that drafted, then championed the Federal Fair Credit and Collection Act. (Note: A stronger version of the law is in effect today.)

The traditional apartment also featured:

1. 12-foot high, white-sponged stucco ceilings;
2. white plaster, also deep red painted, walls;
3. tall wood-paned windows in each of the eight rooms;
4. white marble, wood-burning fireplaces in three rooms;
5. crystal chandeliers;
6. lustrous hardwood floors; and,
7. large oriental area rugs depicting eighteenth century country scenes.

The apartment was appointed with elegant, yet comfortable seating in every room. In the living room: deep red velvet-upholstered sofas, and black leather fireside chairs. In the bedrooms: European-designed settees and chairs, covered in deeper pink or soft rose moiré. Plush velvet upholstery covered the dining room chairs. And hand-sewn satin, moiré, and crushed velvet pillows set on every piece of seating.

The two distinctive period homes – the sprawling contemporary house of the 1960s-1970s, and the large traditional apartment of the 1940s-1950s – provided a very similar peak into elegant yet understated living. In their respective spaces, the owners and residents had created environments that supported their need for creative thought, good taste, peace and contentment. All had surrounded themselves with meaningful symbols of who they were as persons. And, what they represented.

The Chicago area featured many architectural and design masterpieces. I never had the privilege to visit the residences described above. Yet, I have had the opportunity to work on many similar homes. In doing so, the greatest pleasure has been in meeting the unique persons that have lived there.

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Fine design deserves to be preserved with the hand of a fine painter-craftsperson.
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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Both your valuables and your home deserve serious attention to detail when preparing for a major hurricane, or any other natural disaster.

These things are about your personal life – not your workplace. Not your paintshop at work.

This is the time to rev up – at home.

IMPORTANT PAPERWORK, COMPUTERS, PERIPHERALS, ETC.

1. Remove all valuables, important records and papers, logs, journals, etc. from your home, and vehicle (s), even those garaged. TIP: Remove all valuable papers from every file drawer, cabinet.
2. Secure documents in fireproof, waterproof and mold/mildew proof containers such as portable safes, strong boxes, and/ or file cabinets.
3. If possible, place container(s) in a safe, retrievable place off the property – out of reach of the pending disaster. Also out of reach of possible looters.
4. Be sure to place all financial account supplies in the same container(s) – eg. blank checks, credit union vouchers, trust forms, etc.
5. Carefully wrap and secure all flash drives, software packages, etc. in a similar manner.
6. Carefully place all computers, cords, hard drives, and other peripherals into their original boxes if you have them, or equally secure storage containers. Move them into a secure and accessible place on the property. Or move them to a more “hurricane proof” location off your property.

PERSONAL PROPERTY YOU WANT TO PRESERVE

1. Place smaller items in heavy-duty trash bags or plastic containers with tight-fitting lids. Store inside a room or closet in the middle of the home, along back wall of garage, or inside sturdy cabinetry. TIP: Heavier bags/storage containers may fare better. No flying objects, please.
2. Inside each middle bathroom, put a supply of toilet paper rolls and packages, also boxes of facial tissues. TIP: A heavy-duty tall kitchen trash bags works great.
3. Move file cabinets with remaining (non-valuable) contents into closets in front of those heavy-duty trash bags. Push cabinets tightly against the bags, and to each other. TIP: Heavy steel file cabinets make good storage areas for bagged small items. A space-saver idea.
4. Any room left in those middle closets? Cram in small solid wood or steel chest, nightstand, even a small solid coffee table. Fill the corners. Close the doors. Then, inside front part of closet(s), snugly fit that excess stuff that you removed earlier.
5. Move some heavy furniture in front of middle closet or room to barricade your hiding spot even more. (Even if the storm might lift and move those pieces away.)
6. “Wrap” comforter or heavy blankets around each heavy, valuable furniture piece, such as antique secretary with glass. Secure with heavy rope or twine, or wide industrial tape.
7. Move breakable, sharp objects into cabinets, cupboards, drawers, etc. Leave nothing out that could be turned into a harmful weapon that could do major damage to heads, eyes, organs, limbs. TIP: Use rope or heavy twine to inter-tie off all cabinet and cupboards drawers, doors, etc.
8. Clear the tops of tables, dressers, countertops, etc. Move that stuff inside cupboards, drawers.
9. Put all small electronic appliances inside and to the back of BASE kitchen and/or pantry cabinets. TIP: First, you may want to place better ones into heavy-duty tall kitchen trash bags.
10. Look up! Clear all higher shelves of everything. That includes shelves inside cabinets, cupboards, breakfronts, bureaus, armoires; also built-in units. Example items: wall hangings, paintings, curios, collections, decorations.
11. Remove everything from walls that might move, shift, or take flight. Examples: wall hangings, paintings, curio shelves; wall-hung spice racks, knick-knack shelves, book shelf units; cooking/baking utensils, etc. No boomerangs, please.
12. “Valuables?” See section one here.
13. Flip Queen and King mattresses against sliding glass doors, French doors and any other larger spans of glass. Option: Reserve one or two to barricade corridor or room/space where you plan to wait it out. TIP: You may want to close curtains, drapes, blinds before doing this.
14. Move smaller mattresses into hallways. TIP: Other heavy furniture may help barricade here.
15. See: “…Hurricane Preparedness Tips, Part 4, Creating Make-Shift Shelter” for other tips. Examples: How to put other bedding to good use; how to equip and supply your hiding spot.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Not included here are tips for securing outside of home and outbuildings. Examples: Boarding and taping up windows, doors, sliding glass doors; gazebos, greenhouses, pool houses, boathouses; playhouses, treehouses, large pet houses.

Bottom Line: Secure lives first, then valuables and important papers, then the home and vehicles.

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Secure what really matters. Stay safe.
Think ahead. Act in time.
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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”
Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Usually, you can prepare for a hurricane or tropical storm – unlike many other major disasters such as tornadoes or flash floods.

So, there are few reasons, or excuses, for getting caught without any supplies needed to ride out the storm.

In fact, survivors of more than one major hurricane can tell you what to pack – and how. And, they will spare no expletives in describing persons that do not heed their voices of experience.

PACKING TIPS FROM SURVIVORS OF MULTIPLE HURRICANES

1. For each person, fill backpack or luggage piece with at least seven (7) days of essential clothing and health/hygiene aids.
Examples: shirts/tops, pants, socks, underwear, flat and sturdy walking shoes, hat, sunglasses; toothbrush, tube toothpaste/gel, collapsible cup, 2 facecloths, 2 hand towels; roll toilet paper, package moist wipes; also mini-First-Aid kit, skin crème; small flashlight/fresh batteries. See below for other items to consider packing.
TIP: Include packaged snacks, juice boxes/cans inside double zip-locked plastic bag.
2. Each person needs to keep his or her wallet/ handbag/fanny pack with them.
3. For each person, fill out personal information card: medical conditions, medication list, surgeries, health providers’ contact information, etc. Put in wallet/handbag/fanny pack. Make copy for small undergarment bag. See no. 4 below.
4. Each person should also secure small emergency pack to his or her undergarment. TIP: A small waterproof/double zip-lock bag works great. INSIDE: Some cash, car/truck keys; also photocopy of I.D. cards: driver’s license, Social Security, insurance, credit cards, bank/credit union, Medicare, Medicaid; personal info. card.
5. Keep cell phone/ mobile device plus charger close by, to use as soon as service reactivated.
6. Add to same backpacks or luggage: items that person will need to get on with life under disaster hit and recovery conditions.
7. Prepare for “worse case scenario.” Say your roof gets blown off; nearly everything gets sucked out of your closets, or water damaged beyond use. Or you lose your home.
8. Supply each person with “toteable” resting items: bed pillow/double-cased, small blanket.
9. Add to same backpacks or luggage: Prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) medications. Put each person’s current and next month’s supply/containers in his or her luggage piece, Exception: For persons unable to take and manage their own medications, place their supply in your luggage.
10. Place excess, also not currently taken, medications into a waterproof container with tight-fitting lid. LABEL with permanent marker. Place container in the back of a closet in middle of your home.
11. Place remaining carryable essentials in heavy-duty trash bags, or plastic containers with lids. Carefully store in same middle closet used above. TIP: Heavier bags or large storage containers may fare better than smaller ones. Smaller things can easily turn into flying saucers.
12. Put together a “portable cupboard.” Fill plastic container with food staples and more snacks; napkins, foam/ plastic plates, cups, eating utensils; also hand can opener, etc.
13. Put together a sSafety kit.” Fill small waterproof container with small flashlights, batteries, chargers; candles, lighters; First-aid kit; skin, toiletry and hygiene items.

IMPORTANT TIP: Pack as if you know that you will be in a transient-mode for at least one week. When you need to run for your life is way too late to pack the stuff that you have to have to survive.

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Prepare ahead. Get ready.
Channel stress. Stay safe. Take in nature.
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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”
Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Sometimes, you don’t have the option to leave where you’re at, and go to a community shelter to ride out a major storm such as a hurricane.

If you’re at work, it’s your shift. You’ll need to stay put. You may need to put in two or three straight shifts, or more. Teammates may not be able to make it in to work. Also, you may need to stay longer to help secure the property so that others – eg. hotel guests – will be safe.

If you’re at the home of a friend or relative, you may need to stay and help secure the place in case the storm hits there. You may need to take responsibility for their welfare and safety.

If you’re at home, you may or may not be able to vacate, and go to a shelter.

So, how do you create a makeshift shelter wherever you’re at? How do you protect yourself, and possibly others for whom you may be responsible? The following tips are based on preparing a temporary shelter in your home. But, they can be applied almost anywhere.

1. Be realistic. Your time and resources are probably limited. Don’t tackle more than you can handle.
2. Select a spot that will offer you the most protection. HINT: Windowless room or space in middle of structure, preferably first floor, sustaining wall. Examples: Closet, bathroom, small bedroom, pantry.
3. Remove everything from the space that might take wing in the big wind.
Examples: Bath scale, hamper, decorative hangings, cups/glasses, furniture.
4. Empty the room so that you can maximize the space. Put smaller items in heavy-duty trash bags. Securely tie shut. Place outside of your “shelter” area.
5. Move large pieces outside of area’s entry. TIP: Use them to help form a barricade around your shelter space. Examples: Oak chest, upholstered chair, table.
6. Inside “shelter” space, select the SPOT where you will actually sit it out.
7.Over that SPOT, lay large, heavy-duty trash bags. On top, place 1 or 2 large comforters. Add for each person: 1 zip-out sleeping bag or 2 blankets, 1 bed pillow/ double-cased, 2 bedsheets. Add: flashlights with fresh batteries, also 2 bottled waters per person.
8. If “shelter” space is a bathroom, set closed 1-to-5 gallon containers of water close to toilet for flushing. TIP: At least 10 gallons. You don’t know how long you will be in this space. Supply with toilet paper, moist wipes, handy-wipes, hand sanitizer; bottled waters.
9. If “shelter” space is NOT a bathroom, turn nearby spot/corner into a lavatory area. “Equip” with one or two, 5-gallon buckets or a large, heavy storage container – all with tight-fitting lids. “Supply” with package toilet paper, pack moist wipes, cylinder handy-wipes, heavy-duty trash bag, tall kitchen garbage bag; bottled waters (for drinking).
10. Fill a small plastic storage container with toiletry and hygiene aids. Secure lid. Place next to spot where you will sit. Suggested items: 2-3 packs moist wipes, First-Aid kit, 2 rolls toilet paper, 1 roll paper towels, 1 tube toothpaste, 1 toothbrush per person, 1 small or medium sized bottle mouthwash.
11. Put foods and healthy snacks that do not need preparation or cooling into another container. Close with tight lid. Place this container near “shelter” spot. Include: can opener, pack of foam or plastic plates or bowls, cups; plastic eating utensils (forks, spoons, knives); roll of paper towels.
12. Within easy reach, set large cooler/insulated container. Last minute, place freeze packs plus foods that need to stay cold. TIP: Limit items, their size and quantity to prevent spoilage, and possible poisoning. Suggested: Foods you can eat or drink from their disposable containers.
13. Within easy reach, set 1 or more cases of bottled water.
14. Within easy reach, place plastic container with “time fillers” inside. Examples: ballpoint pens, box crayolas/colored markers; puzzle booklets, activity books, “finger” puzzles (eg. Rubic Cube, Eboi); box playing cards, small game, 2 notebooks, small all-band radio/fresh batteries; extra packages of batteries, 2-3 paperback books, devotional book, your smaller Bible.

IMPORTANT TIP: Try to set up this entire area so it’s relatively safe and comfortable, also easy to keep clean, hygienic and dry.

See: Painter’s Hurricane Preparedness Tips, Part 5: Packing for Riding Out Storm.

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Any potential major disaster needs to be respected, and taken seriously.
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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”
Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Most painter apprentices start out by doing grunt work – in the paintshop, and on site.

 

THINGS A PAINTER APPRENTICE MAY HAVE TO DO

 

  1. Basic surface preparation: sanding, washing, caulking, puttying, degreasing, masking, dusting, patching walls/ceilings, scraping off loose paint.
  2. Studying job site blueprints and specifications for scheduled paint/finishing product.
  3. Learning to prepare various surfaces for specific types of coatings and finishing products.
  4. Driving company supply/equipment truck to and from job sites.
  5. Loading and unloading paint products and equipment.
  6. Picking up, delivering and packing up, storing supplies, tools, work tables, etc. used by the journey painters.
  7. Moving or removing furniture, large fixtures, area rugs, etc.
  8. Spreading out dropcloths; covering furniture, fixtures, built-ins, flooring, that can’t be removed.
  9. Organizing and setting up, then taking down work areas.
  10. Removing, then replacing fixtures, electric outlet covers, window shades/blinds/treatments.
  11. Mixing and pouring paint, filling paint pots and trays.
  12. Setting up masking/tape dispensers and machines, and other supplies, tools, equipment.
  13. Opening, unwrapping, unrolling boxes of plastic sheeting, masking/film papers, wallcoverings.
  14. Holding or stabilizing ladders, scaffolding sections, planking systems.
  15. Assisting journey painters.
  16. Stripping wood and metal surfaces.
  17. Repairing metal with polyester patch.
  18. Rough sanding and scraping of chipped, alligatored and worn paint and finishes.
  19. Basic drywall finishing and sanding; also prepping if that job was left to painters.
  20. Applying prime and finish paint products, when all other work is caught up.
  21. Stacking wood moldings, trims, frames, etc.
  22. Moving doors, framing; shutters, thresholds, railings, etc.
  23. Removing masking and taping materials, dropcloths, sheeting, etc.
  24. Cleaning all overspray from unpainted surfaces.
  25. Folding up dropcloths, sheeting, etc.; loading them onto supply truck..
  26. Cleaning up, picking up, sweeping, and clearing out work areas at end of each day.
  27. Soaking, cleaning and restoring paintbrushes, roller covers and frames; extension rods, etc.
  28. Flushing or washing out paint spray systems: spray guns, spray pots, hoses, compressors.
  29. Cleaning out buckets, paint trays, filters, racks, soaking carriers.
  30. Properly closing and sealing all product containers, boxes, tubes, wrappings, crates, etc.
  31. Disposing all chemical and hazardous products and supplies according to EPA, HazMat, and manufacturer instructions.
  32. Keeping paintshop storage and work areas organized, picked up, cleaned up, cleared out.

 

Actually, the list is endless. Too, it can be extended at any time, and by different persons, too.

 

Working as a painter apprentice can seem like a very dead-end and thankless job. And, most apprentices can’t wait to get handed that first paintbrush and a gallon of paint, and be ordered to paint a surface.

 

However, the smart apprentices will take advantage of every minute that they must spend doing that grunt work. They will literally see what it takes to run a job. Every physical aspect of it.

 

And, they will UP their learning curve every day that they’re on the job. From check-in time till check-out. (Actually, off the job, too.) Observing more. Listening more. Seeing more. Smelling more. Touching more. Learning more. Soaking in all that they can. Like a top grade Greek sea sponge.

 

SPECIAL BONUSES THAT PAINTER APPRENTICES MAY GET

 

Many painter apprentices have the opportunity to go onto different job sites. They are able to meet many people: experienced craftspersons and bosses in various construction trades. They get to be around architects, engineers and designers (in various fields); suppliers and manufacturers’ representatives; government inspectors; customers and clients; even investors.

 

Starting at the bottom in the painting trade offers so many long-term benefits. It offers invaluable preparation work for building a successful career as a journey painter, a finishing/detail painter and decorator, a contractor, a consultant, a trainer/instructor, an construction industry expert, an U.S. government expert in construction and building, occupational health and safety, environmental protection, etc.

 

I’ve met over a dozen painters that have ended up building successful careers as product designers or inventors; others as product/materials testers and analysts. Even as speakers and authors.

 

Where grunt work can take the painter apprentice is really up to him or her. Where it leads some day may be to a quality of life, and a way of life, that he or she could have never imagined when first signing up with IUPAT, a technical school, and/or painter apprenticeship programs.

 

The door is wide open.

 

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There’s honor in beginning at the bottom. There’s honor at the top,

especially if you respect others who are just beginning. RDH

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Have a safe, rewarding week. And thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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