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Painter’s View: Modifying Your Hotel’s Color Scheme

Supposedly, residential painters possess the greatest creative latitude in using color. Their palette is color wheel sized.

Hotel and facility painters tend to be confined to the master color scheme established for the property. Then, specific surfaces, areas and amenities on the property.

That said, they can expand that palette. They can give the property, and people, a huge boost!

 

My suggestion? Start on the right foot.

1. Be certain that you have identified the exact color scheme currently approved by the owners.

2. Check out where what colors are used.
Example: Sherwin-Williams Yellow crème. Front road entrance and lobby/office building.
Example: S-W Chinese Red. Front entrance and lobby building fascia.
Example: S-W Deep Mint Green. Exteriors of guest buildings.
Example: S-W Bright Gold. Exterior doors of guest rooms.

3. Confirm with the owners their preferences and limitations for making color use changes.
Q. What colors in that color scheme can be modified?
Q. What new tints, hues and/or shades are acceptable?
Q. On which surfaces and areas can what specific new colors be applied?

TIP: Get sample color swatches approved in advance. In writing!

 

TEN TIPS FOR MODIFYING COLOR SCHEMES

1. Building exterior fascia and trim. Be consistent.
Example: If the front lobby building is trimmed in S-W Chinese Red, then trim all buidings on the property in the same color hue. The finish may need to be varied, depending on the surface.

2. Option: If color scheme features, say, six colors, use all six at front entrance area. Then, paint the fascia and trim on each building in one, or different hue from color scheme palette.

3. Then, paint other exterior surfaces on or near respective building in that hue.

4. Select one color from the color scheme. Mix two-to-three tints closely related to that color. Choose two-to-three types of surfaces and areas around the property to paint in those different tints.
Example: Park benches, signage frames, litter collection boxes. Paint in S-W Medium Mint Green, one of the new tints.

5. Select two colors from interior color scheme. Mix two-to-five tints closely related to those colors. Then, choose two-to-five types of surfaces/areas to paint in those new tints.

6. Choose two different tints from the same new one above. Paint two areas in the office area in those tints to liven up the workspace.

7. Choose the mid-level tint from that 2-5 that you mixed already. Create accent wall in sales director’s office. Paint darker tint on bottom half of the wall. Then, tint that color two levels lighter. Use that color to apply decorative finish – eg. vertical stripe – to upper half of wall.
Added touch: Paint a long narrow section of wainscoting/trim a darker tint of same color. And install it mid-point horizontally.

8. For the G.M’s office, use the darkest tint that you mixed. Create an accent wall by applying decorative finish on entire wall.

9. In main hallway to a restaurant, brush on a light tint of one of the lobby colors from the color scheme. Added touch: Paint wainscoting/trim section in same tint, or two shades darker.

10. Fitness room. Paint three-foot wide vertical stripe on both entry walls. Use one of lighter colors from master color scheme.

The idea is to build on the color scheme that you already have in place. Wherever possible, you want to extend and accentuate that theme. You want to unify the overall aesthetic appearance of painted and decorated elements on the property.

And, ultimately, you want to strengthen and solidify the guests, and teammates, overall perception and connection to your hotel.

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A painter’s role includes the enhancement of what’s already there!
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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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Painter’s View: How a hotel can move more “upmarket”

It can take a big chunk out of the budget to move a hotel into a higher position in the marketplace. Usually, special funds must be allocated for that purpose. And, many independent operations don’t have that kind of capital to invest.

 

Still, they need to do something drastic to appeal to a clientele that will pay more and spend more. And, hopefully, return more often.

 

Thirteen ways that a painter can help move his hotel “upmarket”

 
1. Demonstrate to management what a color scheme change can do, even for just exterior accenting and trim.

 

2. Choose, say 20, rooms to start. And, decorate each with a specific theme.

Example: Countryside – Use template to stamp rose motif on walls, to create fake “dado.”

TIP: Coordinate each theme with the hotel’s overall image.

Examples: nautical, Americana, oriental, European, southwestern.

 

3. A change in color scheme and application of a simple faux finish on one wall costs very little, and easy to do.

Example: Soft tones create a fresh, airy feel.

 

4. Apply a “frottage” effect over dado to team with wallpaper, or the plain painted surface on the lower wall.

Example: Soft green is restful and peaceful.

 

5. Stencil and paint special motifs in hotel’s current color scheme on the walls of children’s lofts or rooms in family suites.

TIP: Printed wallpaper borders work great, too.

 

6. Sand, then stain “distressed” wood furniture pieces in colors that blend with paint colors of walls.

Examples: Headboards, bedside tables, mirror/picture frames, desks, writing tables.

 

PROJECT NOTE: For one hotel, I sanded the heavily scratched and faded wood chairs in the family restaurant. Then I applied a slightly different color of stain on each chair. The effect: An exciting, fun look!

 

7.  Sand, then apply two coats of gloss paint on the tops only of older wooden tables throughout the property. Select complementary colors that, together, will brighten the day for guests and staff.

Examples: Front lobby, front offices, restaurants, foot court, guestrooms, meeting rooms.

TIP: Get very creative. Apply faux marble effect, paint checkerboard pattern.

 

PROJECT NOTE: For one art décor hotel, I decorated some small table tops with a wood inlay pattern.

 

8. Brighten up the pool/gazebo/bar area. Spray paint each table a slightly different hue or tint of the same color, from the hotel’s color scheme.

 

9. Or, keep the tables the same color. And spray paint one chair at each table a slightly different hue or tint of a color, used in the area already.

Example: If the area’s color scheme is “tropical” yellow, lime green, aqua, and melon, paint one chair at each table in a little lighter hue of one of these colors.

 

10. Do you have columns at the lobby entrance, or pool area entrance? On all columns, “wrap around” a stripe in a lighter hue of a color from the hotel’s signature color scheme. TIP: Paint the nearby entrance benches in a slightly darker tint of the same color.

 

11. Apply two coats of gloss paint onto the worn park benches around the property.

TIP: For great attention getters, paint each in a different color, from the hotel’s overall color scheme. The effect: Electrifying!

 

12. Create honor walls in public areas of buildings. Examples: “Hotel’s History,” “Staff Honors,” “Children’s PROArt Gallery.”

Example: Front lobby, corridor to a restaurant, conference center hallway.

 

13. Get hold of a lot of picture frames, different sizes. Paint each one in a striking color, that contrasts with the wall color where the frames will be hung. A different hue of the wall color works great, too.

 

Painter’s Power Point: Many of these touches can be achieved by tinting extra paint that you already have in the paintshop. When your budget is tight, or even frozen, look at what you have. Set aside what you need to keep for basic work orders and projects. And, little by little, liven up the place.

 

PROJECT NOTE: On one project, I actually enlisted the creative talents of two hotel staff members who loved to paint! A housekeeping supervisor and an online sales person. They helped a couple of hours, after their regular work hours, for at least five days. They had a great time, and did a great job!

 

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Staff painters can help “upmarket” their property by treating surfaces to a change!

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Stay cool and calm, everyone. Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”
Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

More Painting and Decorating Quick Tips!

1. Regarding color selection and matching to palette: From a paint store, get three duplicate color card strips for each color in your palette. For each color, cut apart two of the color card strips. Next, tape on the areas that you want to cover. Place them closely together. View in the daylight, also in the dark, and under artificial light.

2. Use better quality preparation products, supplies and tools – ones in good condition. And, protect the bare space the best that you can.

3. Use the best quality paint and finish products, bristle brushes and roller covers that you can afford.

4.  Use proper, quality finish-producing supplies, tools and methods.

5. Paint in mild weather, whenever possible. For professional/trade painters, that’s often impossible. So, we opt, if possible, for the better time of the day to apply certain products and finishes.

6. Always read and follow manufacturer product labels for guidelines to achieve the best results. Look for information about temperature, weather conditions, climate, drying time, surface prepping, application, etc.

7. All reputable manufacturers do improve even their most popular products from time to time. One little instruction can change enough to require you to change your procedure, too!

8. Look beyond the obvious surfaces to be painted, when selecting your color scheme. Examples: soffits, trims, turrets, fretwork, set-ins/built-ins,  chair railings, wainscoting, half-walls.

9. Short on time? Self-priming painting may be a good option. It can hide hard-to-conceal colors. Note: Generally it costs more.

10. Do you have a high traffic/high use area to finish? High-sheen, high-quality acrylic latex paint tends to give a tough finish and exceptional stain resistance. Also, it keeps clean and fresh-looking longer.

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