Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

Posts tagged ‘colors’

See: Real Simple’s August 2016 “How to Paint (Just About) Anything”

RealSimple August 2016 Photo

Article Photographs by Christopher Griffith, Prop Styling by Ariana Salvato, Illustrations by Toby Neilan

Real Simple’s August 2016 issue features a 10-page spread, “How to Paint (Just About) Anything.”*

 

Check it out. Whether you’re a professional, card carrying painter/decorator, or a DIY painter.

You may pick up a few new tips, or refresh ones that you haven’t thought about lately.

 

 

 

 

The “How to Paint…” article features:

 

  1. Stunningly clear “Paint tester app (free)” photo, page. 151.
  2. Overview of types of paints, finishes, applications and supplies, and “helpful helpers.”
  3. Capsule-sized instructions on computing prepping and priming quantities needed
  4. 30-second tips on coating trims, ceilings, floors, front doors, and kitchen cabinetry.
  5. Mini-tutorial on “How to Roll the Right Way.”
  6. Quick steps for painting special surfaces such as brick, metal, laminate, ceramic tile.
  7. Quick tips for panting indoor and outdoor furniture.
  8. A few consumer problem and solution scenarios.
  9. Simple, essential steps for cleaning up tools after completing a project.
  10. Direction tips for deciding what to do with leftover paint.

 

The copy is clean, concise and easy-to-read. The layout is easy-to-follow. The full-color photos and illustrations of products, supplies and tools are small, very clear and detailed.

 

“The Paint Experts,” who served as advisors for the article, include:

 

  • Katherine Kay McMillan, coauthor, Do-It-Yourself Painting for Dummies.
  • Carl Minchew, VP/color innovation and design, Benjamin Moore.
  • Chris Richter, Sr. merchant/interior paint, The Home Depot.
  • Lucianna Samu, color and DIY expert, paint educator, Benjamin Moore and Aubuchon Hardware.
  • Brian Santos, “the Wall Wizard,” author and industry expert.
  • Cheri Sparks, owner, A Painting Company, Denver, Colorado.
  • Stephanie Tuliglowski, artist/decorator, Joliet, Illinois.
  • Dustin Van Fleet, interior designer/owner of Funk Living, Tifton, Georgia.
  • Rick Watson, Dir./product information, Sherwin Williams.
  • Debbie Zimmer, spokesperson/Paint Quality Institute, div. of Dow.

 

* Written by Amanda Lecky, Photographs by Christopher Griffith, Prop Styling by Ariana Salvato, Illustrations by Toby Neilan; Pages 148-157. Real Simple: Life Made Easier is published by Time, Inc.; www.RealSimple.com.

 

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Pro painters and decorators tend to learn something new about their craft every day.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob” today.

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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Painter’s View: How a hotel can move more “upmarket”

It can take a big chunk out of the budget to move a hotel into a higher position in the marketplace. Usually, special funds must be allocated for that purpose. And, many independent operations don’t have that kind of capital to invest.

 

Still, they need to do something drastic to appeal to a clientele that will pay more and spend more. And, hopefully, return more often.

 

Thirteen ways that a painter can help move his hotel “upmarket”

 
1. Demonstrate to management what a color scheme change can do, even for just exterior accenting and trim.

 

2. Choose, say 20, rooms to start. And, decorate each with a specific theme.

Example: Countryside – Use template to stamp rose motif on walls, to create fake “dado.”

TIP: Coordinate each theme with the hotel’s overall image.

Examples: nautical, Americana, oriental, European, southwestern.

 

3. A change in color scheme and application of a simple faux finish on one wall costs very little, and easy to do.

Example: Soft tones create a fresh, airy feel.

 

4. Apply a “frottage” effect over dado to team with wallpaper, or the plain painted surface on the lower wall.

Example: Soft green is restful and peaceful.

 

5. Stencil and paint special motifs in hotel’s current color scheme on the walls of children’s lofts or rooms in family suites.

TIP: Printed wallpaper borders work great, too.

 

6. Sand, then stain “distressed” wood furniture pieces in colors that blend with paint colors of walls.

Examples: Headboards, bedside tables, mirror/picture frames, desks, writing tables.

 

PROJECT NOTE: For one hotel, I sanded the heavily scratched and faded wood chairs in the family restaurant. Then I applied a slightly different color of stain on each chair. The effect: An exciting, fun look!

 

7.  Sand, then apply two coats of gloss paint on the tops only of older wooden tables throughout the property. Select complementary colors that, together, will brighten the day for guests and staff.

Examples: Front lobby, front offices, restaurants, foot court, guestrooms, meeting rooms.

TIP: Get very creative. Apply faux marble effect, paint checkerboard pattern.

 

PROJECT NOTE: For one art décor hotel, I decorated some small table tops with a wood inlay pattern.

 

8. Brighten up the pool/gazebo/bar area. Spray paint each table a slightly different hue or tint of the same color, from the hotel’s color scheme.

 

9. Or, keep the tables the same color. And spray paint one chair at each table a slightly different hue or tint of a color, used in the area already.

Example: If the area’s color scheme is “tropical” yellow, lime green, aqua, and melon, paint one chair at each table in a little lighter hue of one of these colors.

 

10. Do you have columns at the lobby entrance, or pool area entrance? On all columns, “wrap around” a stripe in a lighter hue of a color from the hotel’s signature color scheme. TIP: Paint the nearby entrance benches in a slightly darker tint of the same color.

 

11. Apply two coats of gloss paint onto the worn park benches around the property.

TIP: For great attention getters, paint each in a different color, from the hotel’s overall color scheme. The effect: Electrifying!

 

12. Create honor walls in public areas of buildings. Examples: “Hotel’s History,” “Staff Honors,” “Children’s PROArt Gallery.”

Example: Front lobby, corridor to a restaurant, conference center hallway.

 

13. Get hold of a lot of picture frames, different sizes. Paint each one in a striking color, that contrasts with the wall color where the frames will be hung. A different hue of the wall color works great, too.

 

Painter’s Power Point: Many of these touches can be achieved by tinting extra paint that you already have in the paintshop. When your budget is tight, or even frozen, look at what you have. Set aside what you need to keep for basic work orders and projects. And, little by little, liven up the place.

 

PROJECT NOTE: On one project, I actually enlisted the creative talents of two hotel staff members who loved to paint! A housekeeping supervisor and an online sales person. They helped a couple of hours, after their regular work hours, for at least five days. They had a great time, and did a great job!

 

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Staff painters can help “upmarket” their property by treating surfaces to a change!

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Stay cool and calm, everyone. Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”
Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Remodeling, Retrofitting and Redecorating for an 81-Year Old “Roommate”

 

A literary agent, with whom I’ve become acquainted, lives in a hotel penthouse in Manhattan. She calls it the smartest investment that she’s ever made.

 

The woman protects her investment by self-paying for the remodeling, and the painting and decorating, of the 4,500 square foot property.

 

She keeps a small, by comparison, 2,000 square foot apartment in South Florida. On the top floor of an ocean front hotel. She self-pays for the painting and decorating of that property, too.

 

Both homes are decorated in light-toned natural woods, fibers and colors. And relaxing patterns.

* Woods: Oak, pine, olive ash, and sycamore.

* Fibers: Leather, chenille, chintz, and cords.

* Colors: Ivory, ecru, soft coral, muted lime green, and pale turquoise.

* Patterns: Narrow stripes, one-half to one-inch checks, and small block prints; subdued geometrics, pastel floral garden prints.

 

Both homes are furnished and accessorized with an eclectic collection of pieces from the Midwest. Some have been inherited or “gifted” from relatives. Others have been purchased from small antique and second-hand shops in western Ohio and eastern Indiana.

 

What stands out about the person is what also stands out about her homes. (And her office.) A practical, understated and low-stress approach to business, relationships, and life.

 

In 2015, the 30+ year publishing veteran started to remodel both her New York City and Miami homes. They are being retrofitted to accommodate her new roommate: her 81-year old mother.

 

The younger woman runs three miles every day. The older woman hand-pushes her wheelchair or walker around every foot, every day.

 

In some ways, their lives couldn’t be more different. In most ways, starting now, their schedules couldn’t be more in sync. And, their needs and preferences couldn’t be more unique.

 

The same woods and colors are being used, as before. Some fibers will change.

 

All structural impediments are being removed: steps, stairs, raised/lowered floor areas, landings; protruding walls, sharp corners, barriers, protrusions. Doorways are being widened to at least 42 inches. All doors will open outward, from whichever side a person is approaching. Also, they will open by a touch pad, or remote-controlled beam.

 

What the literary agent calls “ballet bars” – actually padded safety bars – are being installed along every walkway, wall, base cabinetry unit/section, etcetera. Also in every bathtub and shower, the outdoor patio, etc.

 

All plush carpeting has been removed, and will be replaced with tightly-woven commercial grade floor covering. Like you find in fine restaurants, hotels and resorts, hospitals, business complexes.

 

All sinks, cupboards, countertops, appliances, fixtures, commodes, etc. are being lowered or raised to ease their use.

 

All upholstered pieces will be outfitted with washable, rubber-backed, and soft snugly-fitting slipcovers. All window treatments and systems – shades, blinds, curtains, drapes – will be controlled by remote, or by hand. So will all fixtures – eg. lighting, faucets. So will all cabinet, drawer, closet, and appliance doors.

 

The idea is to help make both homes as livable as possible for both “roommates.” To make accommodations for impairments, special needs, and even future limitations natural and easy to use. While making the preferences of each resident an important part of the “blended lifestyle”!

 

As the daughter and homeowner puts it, “I want to provide a very safe and secure home. And a sanctuary for now, and the future. For both of us…”

 

On the day that I stood inside the Florida apartment, rain pelted against the French doors, that led to the extra wide patio. Through the haze, I could see the ocean waves rolling into shore.

 

“It’s all so beautiful,” a soft voice, weakened by age and illness, remarked from beside me. “A very different, but good beautiful from our old home in Ohio.”

 

The lady sat in her wheelchair. A fleece-lined pants and hooded jacket in soft daffodil yellow kept her cozy. She peered through her new pair of binoculars.

 

“What a place! If Daddy (her husband) could see us now!”

 

“Wait till our Florida place is completely remodeled, retrofitted and redecorated, Mom.”

 

What an honor to be a part of such a special project.

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Accommodating for others’ needs and preferences also accommodates for our own.

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Thanks for being a part of the world of “life” and for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: Hotel Teen Center & Computer Room

BASIC FEATURES and AMENITIES of TYPICAL TEEN CENTER/ROOM/AREA

 

  1. Carpeting or carpet tiles: Dense weave, darker solid colors or patterned, bright color accents.
  2. Walls: Painted and/or commercial wall vinyl; darker shades, bright color accents.
  3. Windows: Unobstructed view of outdoors; windows overlooking hallway; no windows.
  4. Entrance: Often open, and no doors. Any doors may be wood, or vinyl-coated.
  5. Computer area: Washable/durable surfaces: countertops, height-appropriate chairs/stools.
  6. Seating: Bean bag chairs. Upholstery: vinyl/fabric; heavy-duty, stain and water resistant.
  7. Other furniture: Café booth(s) with benches (bolted down); couch, arm chairs; work table.
  8. Lighting: Recessed lighting, fixtures for reading/close-up work; workstation lighting.

 

COLORS THAT TEENS WANT

 

Note: Bright anything tends to be first choice. With older teens, dark colors are popular, too.

 

  1. Main colors: Dark colors – eg. black, gray, forest green, purple – on the walls.
  2. Accent colors: Red, hot pink/fuscia, purple, lime, orange, bright blues,
  3. Ceiling color(s): Multiple colors – light-to-dark; bright colors. Not solid whites, or pastels.

 

“CREATE WITH” SPECIAL EFFECTS THAT TEENS LIKE

 

  1. Create with paint: Murals and graphics. Interactive and erasable mural wall, on which teen guests/patients/visitors can add-to – eg. drawings, illustrations, cartoons, caricatures, graphics, scenics. Multi-designed mural in black and shades of gray. Faux layer-on-layers; reflective looks; subtle images.
  2.  Create with wallcoverings: Textured with bright colors; cosmic, galactic, luminaries; graphics and geometrics in bright colors.
  3. Create with carpeting/carpet tiles: Multi-colored; solids, stripes, colorful patterns in carpet.

Fun/game/hot spots. F.Y.I: “Game Room Fun” blog, posted January 20, 2015.

  1. Create with wood: Faux design simulating wood; multi-colored painted or stained wood.
  2.  Create with wallboard/fiberboard: Multi-layered in puzzle pieces, various colors, one wall.
  3. Create with other materials: Cork block and vertical panel bulletin boards. TIP: Alternate with adjacent painted panels. Colorful fabrics on walls; bright colored trims, moldings.

IDEA: Create Amazon rain forest atmosphere. On one wall painted muted tropical green, clip/staple simulated or real bamboo stalks. Carpet entire/part of room in variegated green tiles. Create jungle “path.”

  1. Create with lighting/fixtures: Track lighting, using various colored bulbs; spotlights; globes.

 

COMBINING COLORS, PATTERNS, TEXTURES, GRAPHICS, ETC.

 

  1. Patterns: Overlap stencils with bright colors, 3-dimensional transparent designs.
  2. Textures: Multi-colors to form design on wall. TIP: Various shades and tones of one color.
  3. Graphics: Geometrics hand-painted, or done with wallcoverings (eg. remnant commercial weight vinyls). Texting acronyms, words, phrases painted in curved lines/arches. Symbols.
  4.  Scenics: Hand-painted animated scenes, wallcoverings of real-life nature scenes – eg. islands.
  5. Murals: Teen-involved paintings – eg. street scenes, dance club, optical illusions.
  6. Overlays: Wallcovering over freshly-painted surface – eg. Collages, facsimiles of photo-op frames. Adhesive-backed carpet tile shapes for walls, wide arches, columns, cabinetry headers.

 

 

VERY TECHY-FRIENDLY!

 

Features: No-glare surfaces, finishes, lighting, etc. Flexible-use spots. Space-y workstation areas. Movable, durable seating. Smooth material, sturdy, washable upholstery. Open-space feeling, forget doors.

 

CREATING CLUSTER FUN and HOT-SPOTS

 

  1. Games space: Create a system of modular spaces (non-painted) – laminate and solid wood – with interchangeable sections.
  2. Eating/snacking space: Informal; vinyl-covered bar stools, smooth flooring for easy cleaning.
  3. WI-FI/Computer station space: Opportunities here limited only by budget, really.
  4. Groupie/congregate space: Create communal space, where everyone can see each other.
  5. Dancing/Music space: Crate a dance floor, using a design such as geometric wood inlays.
  6. Reading/study/project space: Modular design, open space for circular tables.

 

 

Teens like lots of freedom! Including in spaces they use at the hotel or resort where they are staying overnight. Give them that space. Invite their creative souls. And, they’ll love your hotel, and your staff.
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Thanks, everyone, for keeping in touch – and for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting Them: Restaurants, Clubs and Bars in Hotels and Resorts.

Places where people go to relax or have fun vary in theme, design, and atmosphere. They can be uplifting, heart pounding, eclectic, luxurious, earthy and natural, or any other unique effect.

 

Each atmosphere has a style all its own. And, hopefully, it is appropriate to the type of public the dining and social amenities want to attract.

 

The design and painting of a “restaurant “can include the following features, depending on the overall theme of the area:

 

1. Soft earth tones blended with matte black accents.

 

2. Wood veneer “paneling” and wainscoting with mitered moldings.

 

3. Ceilings painted in off white or pastel beiges.

 

4. Faux finishing applications such as gold leafing and marbleizing.

 

5. Textured wall finishes such as Venetian plaster.

 

When designing and painting a “club,” here are some suggestions:

 

1. In a “bright” club setting, bright and flashing lights mean brilliant flashy colors.

 

2. In a “bohemian” setting, subtle and complementary earth tone finishes set the mood.

 

3. In an “electrifying” setting, a combination of colors sets the pace – eg. reds with purples, and blues with silvers.

 

4. Use “high intensity graphics” with simulated chrome appearance, possibly neons and metallic transparent finishes.

 

The design and painting of a “bar” can incorporate the following options:
1. A bar, which is “relaxing” and conducive to quiet conversation, has a subdued atmosphere. Using darker earth tone colors with moderately dark stain paneled woods is optimal.

 

2. In a bar full of electricity and a fast beat, use bright and reflective colors.

 

3. For ceiling styles, consider a “traditionally finished metal pan ceiling.” Nostalgia can provide a very relaxing and comfortable environment.

 

4. In any case, the bar itself needs to be one “focal point.” Design it with wood paneling, stained in a moderately dark color and finished in a matte sheen of durable vanish or polyurethane. Any molding can be highlighted by finishing with a light oak stain, enhanced by a gloss clear finish.

 

Atmosphere is everything. Patrons will enjoy their meals or drinks much more where they feel at home, almost as much if they were there.

 

Design and paint, that are selected, blended and served right, always go well with food and drink!

 

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Enjoy a little bit of heaven at your favorite spot. Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

 

Painting It: KidSuites and Children’s Rooms

Children want to have fun. And they need to be in an environment which enables them to do so. This is true, whether it is at home or on family vacation in a hotel or at a resort.

 

So, in what ways can a kid’s or children’s room be designed and painted that will create a great fun, and safe, atmosphere? While also keeping a child from becoming bored?

 

Here are some essential ingredients to liven up a kid’s or children’s room:

 

* Use multiple bright paint colors on the walls, ones shown to have a calming effect on children.

Examples: Sky Blue, Kelly Green, Hot Pink, Sun Yellow.

 

* Hang pictures of cartoon characters, action heroes and sports figures on the walls adjacent to the child’s bed.

Examples: Curious George, Pokémon, Hernandez.

 

* Create an area in the room, where children can draw and express themselves, and you can still protect the surfaces from damage.

Example: Dry erase board.

 

I have found that children tend to draw on anything within their reach.

 

* Install simple games, which are fixed to a surface, and have few small pieces that can get lost.

 

* Create an interactive character window, where children can play act and be photographed as some famous person, or cartoon character.

Examples: Mickey Mouse, cowboy, astronaut.

 

Designing the space is not enough!

 

What types of paint or finishes are formulated to hold up the best under the energy of children? I recommend the following:

 

* Ease of washing and abrasion resistant: Gloss enamel or gloss acrylic latex. Either is the best choice when considering ease of workability.

 

* Superior durability: Gloss epoxy. Notes: This product is more difficult to work with; and the odor can be overwhelming.

 

* Wood as the finished material/surface: Satin varnish, or polyurethane clear finish is the most suitable choice.

 

* Hand-painted murals as part of decor: Use sign painter enamel finishes; then a protective clear coat to ensure a lasting quality.

 

Making a children’s room a fun place is hardly new.

 

To make it happen, the approach involves one or more creative adults, and/or talented teens.

 

There is one prerequisite, really, to get started: Ask the children! Usually, they have definite opinions about what makes for a fun environment. Including in their bedrooms. And, they know how to bring that fun environment idea to life!

 

Use lots of color! The more the better. Add some unbridled artistic talent, too.

 

Painting for kids can be great fun.

Supercalifragilisticexpialidosiously fun!
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Two KidSuite-Children’s Room True Tales:

 
1. Two children had gotten very creative in their KidSuite. On two walls, they had drawn and painted in favorite cartoon animals: Curious George, Dinosaur Rex, Rolo the Dog, etc. Over half of the “filling-in” had been done with permanent markers. (Artistically, the 1st grader and preschooler did a great job!)

 

I used a soft scrub sponge to gently clean the surface with mild sudsy soap and warm water. After the family checked out two days later, I went back and used a “kids-safe” and odor-free latex paint to repaint the entire KidSuite.

 

Less than a month later, the walls in the same KidSuite had to be scrubbed again, and repainted. Three children, one only age three, had gotten super creative. With a large set of permanent markers, they had “painted” a “mural” along the walls, across bed frames, over the TV-dresser console, etc.

 

The children were very funny, and lovable. But way too creative and energetic to be holed up, on a rainy day, with nothing to do.

 

 

2. A Cocoa Beach hotel engineer told me about this problem, while his department was still trying to resolve it…

 

Here’s what the housekeepers, and painter, found when they entered a vacated family suite.  Crayolas, permanent markers, paints, colored pencils, colored chalk, and make-up had been used to draw and paint on nearly every surface in the children’s sleeping area, and one-half bath. Also, on two walls in the main sitting area.

 

The painter and an engineering tech worked on the area an entire day with minimal luck. The engineer asked me for suggestions to deter “future creative repeats at this level…” I suggested either of the following:

 

  1. washable, wood-look wall paneling, or
  2. washable, wrap-around kids paint-it mural, or activity paper.

 

Children hotel guests do not set out to damage room/suite walls, furniture, etc. They set out to have lots of fun. To entertain themselves. To get unbored.

 

Children’s hotel rooms and KidSuites need to make room for their energy, creativity, and curiosity.

 

And, the people who operate, clean, paint, and maintain these “special-guest” rooms and suites might want to explore – and install – more user-friendly surfaces!

 

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Children are people, too! So were we adults when we were their ages.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

 

 

Paint Shop I: Organizing and Storing, Part 2: Creating a Place

Creating a place for everything in your paint shop is a challenge. Especially, if your wall and floor spaces are limited.

Other factors enter into the process: number of people that use paint shop, location of shop in proximity to main department, and other departments; volume of traffic; who’s in charge of paint shop operations (YOU?); who manages entire area.

If you are responsible for paint shop operations, take charge. Create a plan that will work for you – and those around you. And, GRID your inventory into spaces that help you do your job like the professional that you are!

 

2. Create A Place for Everything: Gridding your space into sections by category, and use.

 

A. Interior products/materials:

 

(1) Paints. Sort in order of priority, or frequency of use. Store according to areas/uses.

a. General/base products: Standard colors, general use

b. Designated areas: Guest rooms/suites, offices, front offices, lobby, front desk, corridors, public restrooms, game rooms, food courts, restaurants, computer room, health club, theatre, conference center, etc.

 

(2)  Stains/varnishes/ special finishes.  Store in safety cabinet, designed for flammable or combustible products.

a. General/base products: Standard colors, general use

b. Designated areas: Rooms/suites, offices, lobby, front desk, corridors, restaurants, theatre, conference center, etc.

 

(3) Wallcoverings, borders, murals. Store according to areas used in – and in dry area.

a. General use

b. Designated: Rooms/suites, offices, lobby, front desk, corridors, restaurants, clubs, food court, health club, spa, public restrooms, conference center, etc.

* For each, specify location, room numbers, building numbers/names, etc.

c. Tools: Roller (9-in., 3/8-in. cover); level, broad knives, seam rollers, smoothing brush, plastic smoothing tool; Paper Tiger, paper scraper, 10-in-1 tool; shower cap; dust masks, vinyl gloves.

 

(4) Prep products/supplies. Group similar items together.

a. Sandpapers, caulking tubes/guns, fillers, sanding blocks.

b. Scrapers, putty knives, steel wool, Patch sticks.

c. Solvents, thinners, removers, paint strippers.

d. Cleaning chemicals: TSP (alkaline, grease, de-glosses); denatured alcohol (cleans metal); Calgon, Downy; white vinegar (mild acid rinse);  Goof-off 2;

e. Masking paper, tapes, plastic sheeting, masking film.

 

(5) Cleaning/Clean-up Supplies. Conserve space.  TIP: Store  smaller items inside larger ones.

a. Sponges, bags of rags, buckets.

b. Trash bags – different sizes, strengths

 

(6) Protective gear/Safety items. Store gear together, in same section.

 

TIP: Keep related items together.

 

B. Exterior products/materials/supplies/tools/equipment:  Include special sections like the above in “A.”

 

(1) Paints

 a. General use:

 b. Designated: Pools, gazebos, courts, playgrounds, parks, seating, fencing, front entrance, parking, canopy, asphalt, etc.

 c. Compliance/Safety/Zoning

 

(2) Special coatings – for metal, concrete, asphalt, plastic, tile, etc.

 

(3) Exterior stains, polyurethanes, urethanes

 

(4) Prep and cleaning supplies

 

(5) Tools and equipment

 

(6) Protective gear and safety items

 

PAINT WORKSHOP STORY: My father was a superb journey painter and decorator. One of the best in the trade. And, one of the busiest! When he died suddenly in 1993, he left a major mess in his private workshop on the family’s country property. Chaos is a polite word for the disorganized piles, stacks, buckets, etc. of everything everywhere.

The job of making sense of it all – unearthing the inventory, sorting it, discarding what couldn’t be used, inventorying, labeling, organizing, then assigning a price/value to every item – fell on the grieving shoulders, hands and hearts of my mother and myself. (It didn’t help the grieving process.)

JOURNEY PAINTER’s SHOP TIP: Get your paint shop in shape. And, keep it that way. Whether it amounts to a few shelves, a mid-sized room with an adjacent workroom, or a free-standing building/shed. You’ll be glad that you did. So will everyone around you when they need to step into your shoes. Even for a day, or only an hour.

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Staying organized is much easier than you might think. Once you get used to it! Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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