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Painting In: Company Policy, Common Sense, and Common Courtesy: Part 2

Scenario No. 1: A regular hotel guest reports that the paint color used to touch up in his room does not match the rest of the wall. He wants the entire wall repainted immediately. It’s after 3 pm on Day 4 of a 7-night stay. He declines management’s offer to move him to a different room, and “comp” him for one night’s stay.

 

Company Policy: Have the painter inspect the area, and repaint the wall when the guest will be gone for the day.

 

Common Sense: Painter tries to arrange to repaint the wall, when the guest will be out of the room for at least four (4) hours, to allow the fresh paint fumes to dissipate.

 

Common Courtesy: Painter talks, one-on-one, with the guest and explains that the hotel values his patronage. The painter emphasizes the importance of repainting the wall, when it’s safest for the guest.

 

 

 

Scenario No. 2: A guest calls the front desk, and reports multiple large black mold buildups in the bathroom. Rooms Manager offers to move the guest to another room. The guest declines.

 

Company Policy: A housekeeping supervisor assesses the extent of major black mold buildup. She calls the painter to clean up/remove the mold.

 

Common Sense: Painter uses mild soap and warm water mixture to reduce the level of buildup, and the guest’s exposure to mold spores. The standard chemical bleach solution is not used, to prevent the guest from suffering an adverse reaction to dangerous bleach fumes.

 

Common Courtesy: Inform the guest that the mild soap/warm water mixture is a temporary, partial solution. Explain that treatment with the more effective bleach solution requires that the room remain unoccupied for at three (3) hours. HEALTH TIP: Place a fan in the room to increase ventilation, and air flow.

 

 

Scenario No. 3: The painter finds a guest crying, because she has been locked out of her room. He hears young children crying inside. He tries the key card; it does not work. He learns that the guest owes back rent for the room.

 

Company Policy: The guest/mother must go to the front office and make payment arrangements. Then the guest will be allowed access into the room.

 

Common Sense: Painter calls the head of security, to get help for the children a.s.a.p. Painter uses master key card to open the room door. He lets the mother stand in the doorway, and check that her children are safe. Then, he has the guest/mother step back outside. He re-closes and relocks the door.

 

Common Courtesy: Painter gets permission and assists the guest/mother in getting promptly to the front office, to make payment arrangements. A security officer stands guard outside the guest’s room, to ensure the safety of the children inside.

 

 

Scenario No. 4: A customer changes his mind about the paint colors, just applied inside his new martial arts studio. He tries to reject the job, and refuses to pay. He insists that the painters redo the entire job (over 1800 square feet), in time for his grand opening four days away.

 

Company Policy: (1) Payment in full is due when the paint job is completed, per the terms of the contract. (2) The customer rejected paint job because he changed his mind, not because of any problem with the products and/or workmanship. (3) The “redo” is considered a new paint job. It must be contracted separately, and scheduled at the convenience of both the contractor and customer.

 

Common Sense: Talk one-on-one with the customer. Find out what’s really bothering him. Does he have the money to pay for the job completed? Did he, or someone else, select the original color scheme? Regardless: Require payment in full of customer’s bill.

 

Common Courtesy: (1) Offer customer a small cost break for paint job no. 1, if payment in full received within twenty-four hours. (2) If possible, offer to redo the front part of studio in time for the grand opening, using the new colors. Terms: Signed contract for the new paint job, at least one-half prepayment for labor, purchase and delivery, in 24-hours, of all products and materials responsibility of customer.

 

Scenario No. 5: Exterior paint, applied one week ago, peels off the surface in rain. Commercial customer is upset. (The painters: “Us, too!”)

 

Company Policy: Call in paint manufacturer’s rep to inspect, and analyze. Nothing wrong found with the paint. Nothing wrong found with the substrate, surface’s preparation, or paint application by the painters. Strike agreement with paint manufacturer: They pay for new prep and finish products, also re-rental of required equipment – eg. hydraulics.

 

Common Sense: Report to paint manufacturer’s rep all concerns about product (s), and use.

TIP: Check all products, materials, tools, and equipment used for cleaning, removing, prepping.

 

Common Courtesy: Put customer’s final payment on hold till the job is redone. If possible, offer customer a nominal cost break on the whole job. TIP: Do not take the bulk of cost cut out of labor part.

 

Painting In, through, with, or in spite of company policy, common sense, and/or common courtesy challenges is part of the job. And, more often than not, it must be played by ear. Each time around.

 

With experience comes greater perceptivity, clearer understanding, more creativity, and deeper wisdom.

 

By the way, it might well be that youthe painter – are the more perceptive, understanding, creative, and wiser one when it comes to doing your painting job right!

 

 

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Follow through! Stay true to your own high standards and work ethic!

Thank  you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

 

 

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Painting In: Company Policy, Common Sense and Common Courtesy: Part 1

Scenario:
A person – let’s say a painter – leaves his or her employment with a company.

 

Whatever the circumstance, it is standard company policy for any former employee to separate physically from the business, organization, people there, and property.

 

It is standard company policy that a former employee not return onto the property except:

 

  1. for a business reason that requires their physical return;
  2. for an occasional, brief visit – one to two times a year maximum;
  3. by invitation – eg. for a departmental party or cook-out;
  4. to “apply in person” for a job opening;
  5. for a job interview;
  6. to return – a rehire – to work there.

 

 

By the way, any and all returns should be cleared, in advance, with the hotel or facility general manager, or front office. That’s called “respect” or “common courtesy.”

 

It is common sense for a former employee to stay away from the business, organization and people. That gives everyone involved the time and space needed to:

 

  1. yes, mourn the departed employee’s loss;
  2. accept the person’s absence from the team, and the group; and
  3. adjust to the changes necessary because of the person’s departure from the organization.

 

It is common courtesy for a former employee to remain off the property, and away from the organization, except for any of the six reasons given above. This gives the replacement the best opportunity possible to assimilate into his or her new position.

 

He or she needs, and deserves, the opportunity to succeed. The replacement – new employee – has a job to do there.

 

  1. He or she needs to learn the ropes within the department, also interdepartmentally and organizationally.
  2. He or she needs to adjust and tweak his or her skills, abilities and resources to meet the unique needs of the new property – and employer.
  3. He or she needs to be welcomed properly by his new teammates and bosses.
  4. He or she needs to find his or her place on the team, and how to fit in!
  5. He or she needs to establish a reliable communication and negotiation system with his or her supervisor, other department directors, and managers.
  6. He or she needs to build teammate relationships and organizational friendships – at all levels – that are mutually beneficial, supportive and gratifying.
  7. He or she needs to find unique ways to contribute to the organization and the business.
  8. He or she needs to participate in and belong to the company family.

 

 

When a former employee stays off the property, and stays separated from the company, he or she benefits, too. He or she has the best opportunity to succeed autonomously.

 

  1. He or she can mourn the job loss, with the attention and respect it deserves.
  2. He or she can look back and gain a clear perspective of his or her total employment experience – and work life – there.
  3. He or she can reflect, objectively and subjectively, on past achievements, contributions and also unmet goals.
  4. He or she can rest in the present, and both assess and appreciate his current skills and abilities, accrued knowledge, creative talents, aspirations, and place in the world of employability.
  5. He or she can plan for the future. The person can create a plan that (a) respects that person’s work ethic and set of values; (b) offers opportunities for changes, growth and doing well; and (c) fulfills the greater need to feel like the person fits in and belongs, contributes, and can do more good.

 

When my grandfather retired from the ministry, he left a parish where he and my grandmother were totally respected, and deeply loved. In leaving, he announced to the consistory and congregation that he and Grandmother would be “staying away” from the church parish for one full year. Why?

 

“To give the new man a chance,” he explained to everyone concerned. (And, others that asked!)

 

Grandfather knew that it would be a major challenge for the successor to fill his pastoral shoes. He knew that it would be a bigger challenge for “the new man” to establish his own place – his own identity – in the church and in the community. To fit in and to belong!

 

Grandfather kept his pledge, and promise. Yes, he and Grandmother maintained their closest personal friendships with a few individuals and couples in the church. (They had retired there, their home community for over 25 years.)

 

Still, they refrained from having any communications and activities that may have, even indirectly, made “life uncomfortable and difficult for the new man.”

 

As a result, the new man sought Grandfather’s counsel on a regular basis. And, the two clergy became trusted friends, strong supporters of each other, and professional confidantes.

 

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POINTS TO PONDER:

1. Have you ever been a “former employee?” Did you follow standard company policy after your departure?

2. Did you exercise common sense about your former employer, teammates/coworkers, and organization – and their circumstance?

3. Did you practice common courtesy toward your former teammates/coworkers, former managers, and former employer, as well as your replacement?

4. Have you ever been working where and when a former employee showed up repeatedly on the property?  For years? How did you handle the situation each time?

5. How well was the company policy, including security rules, followed by all current employees and managers, including you? By the former employee? By the business owners?

 

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“In the long haul, it pays to follow company policy, exercise common sense, and practice common courtesy – and help others do the same.”

Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Painting with Bob blogs to look for:

Week of December 8:

1. Painting in Company Policy, Common Sense and Common Courtesy.

2. Painting It: A Rooming House for the Homeless

3. Painting It: A Multi-Family Home for the Homeless

4. Decorative Finishing: Adding Life to Your Space

 

Week of December 16:

1. Painters’ Link: Southern Indiana and Central Florida

 

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