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Painter’s World: Little Acts of Appreciation

Every day, a painter’s world includes opportunities to show his or her appreciation. To someone. For something.

 

Ten Acts of Appreciation a Hotel Painter Can Try

 

  1. Thank your teammates, supervisor, and other coworkers for their help, support, etc.
  2. Go easy on the teammate that goofed, again. Even if he or she could have prevented it.
  3. Hold the door open for a hotel guest trying to get moved into his or her room.
  4. Offer to hold something so a guest can strap his or her toddler into the safety car seat.
  5. Cut your chief engineer some slack. Tell him or her, “That’s okay. I can see that you’re under a lot of extra pressure right now…”
  6. Volunteer an extra pair of hands to a teammate, or staff member in another department.
  7. Offer that grumpier or aloof co-worker a way to talk to you without any explanation.
  8. Cover for a teammate when he or she needs to make a personal call during work time.
  9. Cut your co-workers some slack, especially when the work pressure is getting to them.
  10. Discreetly offer a “listening ear” to a co-worker whose mood/behavior/attitude has changed for some reason.

 

Ten Acts of Appreciation a Commercial-Industrial Painter Can Try

 

  1. Thank your fellow crew members for their efforts to bring in a project within constraints.
  2. Offer to cover for a co-worker who needs a little longer lunch or break time.
  3. Foreman: offer the worker, who is very pressured by personal responsibilities, the option to occasionally start work a little later. Or to leave a little earlier..
  4. Give the new guy a hand, or two. Even if he or she is experienced. Remember when you started out there?
  5. Cut that apprentice some slack. He or she is new to painting, and new to your company.
  6. Periodically, thank and visit your suppliers’ stores, shops, websites, LinkedIn.com, etc.
  7. Periodically connect with both your strong and less strong connections through social media. Acknowledge their recent accomplishments, or news. Thank them for any input they’ve given.
  8. On-site crew member: Loan a better paintbrush to a newer coworker, who might not yet own the size or type of brush needed to do the task.
  9. Thank and praise both long-standing and newer crew members. Especially when things have been going rough on the project, and/or for the company
  10. Thank your company’s office staff for making your job more doable. Please thank your foreman, superintendent/boss and company owner once periodically, too.

 

FOOTNOTE: I remember every person that has helped me, as a painter, to have a good day. Their smiles or laughs.  Their joking jabs. Their choices of words. Their handshakes. Their encouragement. The hands that they lent me. Their “training.” Their advice and constructive criticism. It all mattered to me. They all mattered to me.

 

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Showing appreciation works better when it’s sincere, spontaneous, and individualized.

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Behind “Painting with Bob” is a network of dedicated painters, professionals, friends, and editor.

Copyright 2018. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

“The Better Question Changes Everything:” A Painter’s View

In Dan Rockwell’s above-titled blog, posted December 9, 2014, he advised leaders:

 

“Don’t allow people with clean hands to complain about people who are sweaty and dirty.”

 

Every professional painter understands the implication of any question, or comment, about his or her physical appearance, and hygiene, on the job.

 

On behalf of every professional painter everywhere that has gotten sweaty and/or dirty – and been asked or heard about it…

 

FIRST: Definitions of (1) an implied question, and (2) a better question to ask.

 

1. Implied question: What a question suggests or means, by the words, tone of voice, and/or look used.

2. Better question: The question that can be asked, and result in a better outcome.

 

SECOND: Some actual questions that I’ve been asked – one way or another:

 

Implied question: Why aren’t you clean like the rest of us?

Better question: You’ve had a busy day. Any problem that you need help with?

 

Implied question: Your hygiene: Don’t you use antiperspirant?

Better question: It’s been a hot, sweaty job. Thanks for your help. Would you like to cool off under a shower? A few others, including I, use the one in Room 120.

 

Implied question: Why can’t you keep your uniform spotless?

Better question: Thing they’ll ever figure out how to make stain-proof painter’s pants?

 

Implied question: How often do you change uniforms?

Better question: Has the order for your clean uniforms been put on hold again? Yes? Let me see what I can do about that.

 

Implied question: Gross! Why can’t you keep mold and bleach off your uniform?

Better question: What can we do to make this better? Any way we can help make this job easier and safer for you?

 

Implied question: Why does your uniform always look so damp and disgusting by this time every day?

Better question: Wouldn’t it be great to end a work day as fresh-looking as the office people?

 

Implied question: It’s embarrassing! Don’t you know how to keep yourself clean?

Better question: What might we try to make this part of your job less messy. You’re doing a tremendous job around here.

 

Implied question: Boy, do you know that you smell like paint?

Better question: That paint you’re using has an interesting odor, doesn’t it?

 

Implied question: Are you certain that you know what you’re doing?

Better question: Are there other ways to do that?

 

Implied question: Why does it look like that?

Better question: What will it look like when it’s finished?

 

Implied question: Won’t that make a big mess?

Better question: That’s a dirty job, isn’t it? Sorry you have to be the one to do it.

 

Implied question: Can’t you do that any faster?

Better question: That job looks like it’s going to take some time to do. Any idea how much more time you’ll need?

 

Implied question: Are you going to cover the furniture before you paint?

Better question: There sure is a lot to cover before you start to paint. Do you have enough plastic dropcloths, or old clean sheets?

 

Implied question: Why did you do it that way?

Better question: Is there more than one way to do that?

 

Implied question: You won’t leave the room in a mess, will you?

Better question: Would you leave the room as neat as you can when you’re finished?

 

FOOD FOR THOUGHT:

 

1. Timing is everything! Is this a better or worse time to ask this question?

 

2. Location! Location! Is this a better or worse place to ask this question?

 

3. The tendency is to ask that question now, before one forgets, gets distracted, and/or walks off.

 

4. Often, it pays to think a minute, beforehand, about what one wants to say? What point does one want or need to make?

 

5. Often, it pays to anticipate the other person’s reaction or response to one’s question, before one asks it. Does the question need to be phrased differently?

 

6. Too often, the question that one asks implies something very different from what is intended.

 

7. Too often, a question is asked before its implication or effect – versus intent – is considered.

 

8. Many persons don’t recognize the implications of what they have said, until it is too late. Words and actions are not erasable.

9. Sensitivity in the workplace has its place!

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Keep up the good work, everyone. And, thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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