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Painter’s World: On the job on Thanksgiving Day

Usually, hotel/resort and facility painters need to work on holidays, including Thanksgiving Day. Particularly if they are scheduled to be on duty that day of the week.

 

For many reasons, I always enjoyed working on Thanksgiving. Even though many work orders were STAT, guest tempers flared, and bosses went ballistic.

 

10 THINGS THAT MADE THANKSGIVING A GREAT WORK DAY

 

  1. Chance to be with other persons – work friends – on a holiday.
  2. Opportunity to help others enjoy the holiday away from home.
  3. Lighter, more relaxed mood among staff members, even management.
  4. Teammates’ humorous approach to troubleshooting, and handling of problems promptly.
  5. More time allowed for light talk between and among staff members.
  6. Teammate’s holiday stories and jokes during breaks and lunch.
  7. Holiday atmosphere throughout the property.
  8. Festive, respectful attitude of guests and visitors, even when complaining.
  9. “Lightened up” attitude of bosses.
  10. Scrumptious menus prepared by our cooks – and those “doggie bags” for home.

 

10 TIPS FOR ENJOYING THANKSGIVING DAY AT WORK

 

  1. Two-three days before, jot down simple to-do list for the holiday. Select tasks that take little time – and will free you to enjoy the day with others.
  2. Carry in a holiday snack for teammates. Something that they’ll like, tastes great, and is easy to grab and eat on the run. ADDED TIP: Hand out pieces of wrapped holiday candy to fellow staff.
  3. Show up in a holiday mood, and spread it around, without overdoing it.
  4. Be ready to stop and chat with teammates and fellow staff any time your paths cross.
  5. Make the work day a little easier for any teammate that you know is going through a rough time (whatever the reason).
  6. Keep your eyes out for guests that need an extra pair of hands, or smile.
  7. Step in and give your boss an unexpected and extra break time.
  8. “Take two” minutes. Toss a ball with a teen hanging out in your work area outdoors.
  9. “Take five” minutes. Lend a hand to a guest loading up the family vehicle.
  10. Look out for children that appear lost, confused, upset, or ill. Help them get back to family.

 

Remember: Everyone on the property that day will be visiting. Away from home, and away from their own tables.

Give thanks that you’re there on this holiday. There’s a good reason that you are. Make it matter!

 

A TRUE THANKSGIVING STORY…

 

Three turkeys lived, very visibly, in our woods. One Thanksgiving, my dad forgot to pick up his 22+ pound, free Thanksgiving turkey from the company.

 

Without saying anything to anyone, he loaded a rifle and snuck into the woods to shoot a turkey for Thanksgiving dinner.

 

But, the three turkeys had other plans. They disappeared.

 

Dad crept through the trees for over two hours, fighting whipping 40 degree winds and biting snow. Still no turkey.

 

When he came back to the house, Mom asked him, “Where were you? Ron and Carol dropped off your turkey.”

 

Dad looked at his unloaded rifle, then doubled over in laughter.

 

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Give thanks for the turkey that got away, and the turkey that joins you for dinner.

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A safe and memorable Thanksgiving week-end to everyone. And, thanks for reading “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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Painter’s World: The Pro-Labor of Painting

Understanding and implementing labor strategies should be important to everyone who has a job. That is, perhaps with the exception of management. They tend to look out for the needs of the company.

 

Yet, both sides need each other to keep the business in business. They need each other to get the work done in an efficient, qualitative and cost effective manner. When this employee-employer relationship disappears, your job disappears.

 

In the painting trade, which is similar to all labor-intensive trade, the worker expects a fair wage for a reasonable day’s work. Employers expect and work hard to get as much work out of their employees as possible. I agree, as long as the employees’ health and safety are given the attention they deserve.

 

As a painter, what do you really want in the workplace? If asked, I would say (1) to feel appreciated, (2) to be respected, and (3) to be treated as a professional.

 

How are these objectives achieved?  From the standpoint of the employer-employee relationship?

 

1. Professional treatment. As the painter/employee, you know your job and what is required in order to keep it. And, on a consistent basis, you make every effort to perform your tasks in a responsible, productive manner.

 

2. Respect. As the painter/employee, you need certain provisions to be in place. Some of the more important ones include the respect and consideration of the employer, the tools to do the work, and enough time to do the work properly. (About tools: To start, painters need good quality brushes, roller covers, and reliable spray equipment.)

 

3. Appreciation. As a painter/employee, you have the right to have a safe, non-threatening environment in which to work. Both you and your employer have the responsibility to make sure it exists.

TIP A: When the employer drags his heels, be patient. And, try to find out why. Is it due to the cost and an unavailable budget? Consult your supervisor first; then your management or employer. It may be due to the cost of making it so.

TIP B: Don’t dismiss the need to pursue any possible resolution to the problem (s). Be patient.

TIP C: In an extreme case –eg. high toxicity, hazardous chemicals – OHSA (Occupational Health and Safety Administration) can guide you in the best direction.

 

4. Productivity issues. Organize an employee meeting as a group with your supervisor. Clearly (and truthfully) explain anything which keeps you from doing your job efficiently. CAUTION: Don’t blame or accuse anyone personally. Be tactful.

 

5. Wage/Salary issues. Fair wage/ salary is also on a painter’s mind. Don’t think about how much the company is making, or the salary raises for management. Instead, make known the value of your service to the company. Emphasize how you strive to do your best every day.

TIP A: If you must self-pay 100 percent of your health insurance, politely indicate that an increase in wage would be greatly appreciated.

 

 Now, using a more tactical response…

 

First, make sure you are doing all that you can to comply with company policy, productivity and employee regulations. If that fails to help you achieve any goals, follow one or all of the following objectives. NOTE: Some are more proactive than others.

 

1.Prepare yourself for presenting your concerns and issues.

 

TIP A: Write down a list of employee rights that your employer has denied you, and possibly others in the workforce. Make sure they are entitlements guaranteed under the law. Examples: lunch time (30 minutes or more), break availability, extended break time if necessary, compensation for work-related supplies, uniform requirements, workmen’s compensation, employer insurance payments, etc.

TIP B: Read then reread the company’s operations manual, if they issued one. Carefully make a note of any discrepancies or contradictions in their policies and procedures. Especially any that specifically relate to your department, or any other department with which you deal regularly.

TIP C: Compile definitive proof of misconduct on the part of the employer. File in a secure place.

TIP D: Find out the concerns and issues of other staff painters that you know in the region. What grievances do you share, and to what extent?

NOTE: In this process, your employer will probably look for ways to discredit you, starting with your attendance record.

CAUTION: It’s probable that you will lose your job sooner than later, be demoted, or be moved into another position at a different, less desirable location.

 

2. Ultimate response in labor relations. The painter/employee and employer relationship is based on group strength and unity. A number of painters standing together over a legitimate health and safety, or wage, issue can get better results with the employer, especially when you possess concrete and well supported evidence.

TIP A: It’s very possible that, through negotiation and mediation, a fair settlement can be achieved. Resulting in a win-win-win solution for everyone.

CAUTION: The painters may win the case; but they may have difficulty finding new jobs.

 

3. File a formal grievance. Depending on your issue, start with the following: Federal Wage Board/U. S. Department of Labor, OHSA, and EEOC. There are other agencies and organizations that may like to know about your problem.

CAUTION A: Especially when employee safety and health are concerned, fines could be levied until the employer sees fit to comply with the law. Some employers will initiate positive changes promptly. They do not want Federal sanctions on their books. Others will drag their heels, pay the fines at will, and refuse to comply.

CAUTION B: In the painter’s case, he may win or lose. This depends on whether or not the employer wants to do the right thing and improve working conditions.

CAUTION C: The employer may do nothing about the situation. But the employer will find probable cause to terminate you. Example: Employers, in any defendant’s hot seat, tend to shift the responsibility and costs to you. They will brand you as an difficult employee.

 

4. Promptly, locate another job. And resign from your present one.

CAUTION A: You may lose out. Especially if you like your current job, have a solid work record and possess growth opportunities.

CAUTION B: Consider that your job may not be secure at that point. The employer may have already been planning to hire someone to replace you.

 

5. Consider the option to start your own business. Especially if you have a good-to-excellent reputation in the field, possess some great connections and can float a low cash flow for two-to-five years before realizing a net profit. It can be a new beginning where you have control.

CAUTION A: Just remember that you become the employer now, just in case you hire anyone. Think of what you went through.

CAUTION B: Do you want, and are you able, to function well on the other side of the employer-employee scale?

 

BOTTOM LINE: As the labor-employee side of work, you must live up to your responsibility as designated by the employer. If not done, this will produce grounds for discipline or dismissal.

 

Your best asset is your service record. It can be a powerful, high-leverage weapon, when you are negotiating.

 

Validate your position. Hold your ground. Rally for support. And press on. Labor relations is about strength and commitment.

 

Points to Ponder:

  1. What do you have at stake in pursuing any grievance? Examples: current job; chances for promotion; wage/salary increases; benefit upgrades; growth opportunities in your field with other employers, or as an independent; family finances.
  2. Can you afford the potential short-term and long-term losses, and fallouts?

 

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Thank you for reading “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting: Power’s Out!

BOOM! The major transformer blew. Off went all of the power. The bright lights, that I was working under, now dark.

 

The spray gun in my hand: nothing more than an idled device of steel and aluminum.

 

In the background, the steady hum of the gas-powered compressor, assuredly still on the job.

 

 

Without notice, popcorning out the 32-feet by 60-feet ceiling stopped cold. The custom designed effect: less than one-half of the application completed.

 

The “blackout” – totally out of my control – reminded me of an important on-the-job lesson.

 

Some things can’t be prevented by (me) the painter. They can’t be prepared for 100 percent either.

 

All you can do is:

 

  1. Shut down the compressor – if you haven’t done it already.
  2. Take a breather. Maybe take a seat on the drop-clothed floor.
  3. Glance around. What can you do while you wait for the power to come back on?

Example: “Do I need to get the spray gun into that bucket of water nearby?”

  1. Look around. What can you clean up and wipe up without access to power or lights?
  2. Find your meal pack. Grab an apple. Enjoy your lunch a little early.
  3. Go with the flow! Eventually, the power will be restored. And, things will get back to normal. (Well, close enough.)
  4. Personal Note: While I waited for the power to return, sitting outdoors in my Blazer was not an option. Temperature with the heat index and full sun exceeded 100 degrees.

 

SPECIAL TIPS: Does it look like your spray work is done for the day?

  1. Flush out and clean the spray hoses the best that you can. Lasso, tie securely, put in storage area provided. Or, on the truck.
  2. The same goes for your spray gun(s), and all other equipment and tools.
  3. Secure and straighten out the work area before you leave. Tightly close and safely store all containers of texturing, paint, thinners, and other products. Also all supplies.

 

And, there’s always tomorrow!

 

Have a great one: friends, e-mailers, likers, and secured followers.

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Everything of value can be put to good use. Rdh

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Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Getting Unemployed Properties “Back to Work” – Part 2

Recently, I heard of a group of five entrepreneurs that save smaller properties, like the three men did in the Midwest. (See “Getting Unemployed Properties, Part 1.)

 

This group purchases abandoned smaller schools, rehabilitation facilities, hotels, and churches. Then, they remodel and retrofit each property to fill a specific voice in its respective community. “Usually, within a 25-mile radius.”

 

A few examples:

 

  1. One-story elementary school, north central Florida, converted into a residential facility for moderately-to-severely handicapped teens and adults.

 

  1. One-story private elementary school, in northwest Florida, turned into a non-denominational assisted living facility for low-income persons.

 

  1. Two-story hotel, in southeast Georgia, transformed into low-income rental “villas.”

 

  1. 100-room hotel, in north central Florida, retrofitted as an assisted living facility, complete with ADA-compliant pool and spa.

 

  1. One-story high school, turned into short-term rehabilitation center and permanent ALF for handicapped military veterans.

 

  1. Small church and adjoining education building, remodeled as a year-round community center.

 

Within the last five years, the group has purchased, then helped “revitalize and recycle” over 15 properties. Two persons in the group are brothers.

 

One is a cardiovascular physician and surgeon, that co-finances the group’s “property rescue projects.” The other brother is a journey-level painter, that specializes in remodeling, renovating, and retrofitting what he calls “people-public properties.”

 

The painter in the group e-mailed me about his role in getting some of these properties “back to work.”

 

“Usually, I work as both the foreman and line painter on a crew of five commercial painters. My project work can be divided into eight phases.

 

  1. Surface/area assessment – conditions and needs.
  2. Product and color estimating, selecting and ordering.
  3. Tool and equipment selecting, purchasing or renting, and keeping track of.
  4. Work area set-ups and scheduling.
  5. Painter assignments and outfitting.
  6. Painting with the rest of the crew.
  7. Troubleshooting and punch lists.
  8. Cooperating with inspectors and sign-off people.

 

“My work is time sensitive… labor and ability intensive. We rely a lot on each other. Across trade lines…. A big, learning experience for me. On every project…”

 

“The painters’ job on these projects is not to restore the surfaces to their pristine, original condition. It’s not to deal with style-conscious interior designers. And, forget trying to please the owners and investors 100 percent. (This group doesn’t expect that.) We don’t have any of them on these projects.

 

“We’re all here with the same dream: To get the property back to good use. No egos here.”

 

He closed with this motivating message…

 

“Practically anyone can do this. Pull together a few friends and relatives. Pool your brains, money and abilities. Save one building. Help some decent people in your own community.”

 

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“Charity begins where we’re working. Where we’re standing.” rdh

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved

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Painting with “SYMPHONY SAM”

STRADIVARIUS
My mother told me recently about “Symphony Sam.” That’s the name she gave the homeless man that played virtuoso-quality music with his violin, in Chicago’s Pedway. And, he handed out free copies of the official Vietnam Veterans of America newspaper.

 

She met him one morning, in the Pedway between Randolph Street and Michigan Avenue, and S. LaSalle Street. She took the underground walkway, when Chicago’s temperature dropped to the 30s (wind chill factor 20 degrees or lower), and freezing winds bit into one’s cheeks.

 

“Symphony Sam” was a Vietnam Veteran. He suffered from PTSD, the debilitating effects of Agent Orange, relentless pain from the shrapnel still in his back and legs, and major depression. He always wore “a frayed, dark blue suit” when he played in the Pedway. And, a “subtle smile of absolute acceptance.”

 

Prior to serving three tours of duty with the U. S. Marines, “Symphony Sam” taught music at Julliard. Also he played Second Violin, part-time, with the New York Philharmonic, and violin in the orchestra of an on-Broadway theatre.

 

WHAT DOES “Symphony Sam” HAVE TO DO WITH PAINTING?

 

After “Symphony Sam” was released from the military hospital in Japan, he returned to the United States. The only job he could get was painting sublet apartments for a New York City real estate company. He lived with a fellow Vietnam Veteran and his wife, in a small, three bedroom flat.

 

One Christmas, he ended up on a Greyhound Bus, as it pulled into the main terminal, in downtown Chicago. He told my mother that he never remembered buying a ticket, and getting on that bus.

 

He said that he checked into a cheap, but clean hotel on Randolph Street. He carried a few clothes in a small suitcase, and his Stradivarius violin. No painting tools.

 

The hotel’s manager helped “Symphony Sam” get little painting jobs at other small hotels, located in the Loop.

 

One night, he suffered a severe PTSD episode. He said that he’d been fortunate. All of his previous attacks, in New York and Chicago, had been mild ones. He ended up in Michael Reese Hospital on the South Side.

 

Since then, he’d been unable to work regularly. When he had enough money to get by, he stayed at that cheap hotel, managed by the friendly Sicilian. Usually, though, he “lived underneath the city…with a few friends…also Vietnam Vets.”

 

My mother saw “Symphony Sam” for the last time in 1989. The week before Christmas. “He wore a newer, used suit, and a pair of polished black boots,” she told me.

 

He told her that he had been living back at the hotel. He worked part-time doing repairs and painting for “a list of steady customers.” He called them “small hotel people.”

 

“Symphony Sam” seemed content,” Mom told me. But, her eyes told me a different story. A major concern of hers, over twenty-five years later.

 

Did “Symphony Sam” make it? For how long? In 1989, when she saw him last, he was over 55. PTSD and Agent Orange’s lung effects had become less manageable. Several common medical conditions had set in. “His newer suit hung on his frame, always very bony,” my mother recalled. “His eyes an eerie tornado green. . .”

 

“Florida has ‘Symphony Sams,’ too,” said my mother recently. On “FLASHPOINT,” two Central Florida homeless coalition officials were describing the modern housing facility to be built for the homeless in the area. A plea was made for major capital support from corporations.

 

What about the “foreclosure-bound” hotel that a church congregation and volunteers converted into studio efficiencies for the local homeless? (“Painting It: A Multi-Family ‘Home for the Homeless,” posted December 11-12, 2014.)

 

What about the abandoned mansion, turned into a transitional residence for the homeless? (Watch for: “Painting It: Existing Home for the Homeless,” to be posted December 23-24.)

 

What about “Symphony Sam?”

 

“I would offer these people a much quicker solution.” I told relatives during Thanksgiving.

 

“Constructing a new structure – a large transitional housing facility, for millions of dollars – could take a couple of years,” I explained. “The groups involved in the Central Florida project – facility – haven’t even selected the land yet.”

 

Here’s one proposal to help people like “Symphony Sam” have a safe, clean home – and a chance at a better life.

 

  1. Rescue a few smaller hotels and motels along U. S. Highway 192. The ones plagued by low occupancy rates, disrepair and damage, and the threat of foreclosure.
  2. Repair them. Reconfigure their rooms and public areas. Set up a central dining area for the homeless residents.
  3. Recruit homeless persons, who once worked as skilled construction workers. Put them to work. They can help in making certain repairs and reconfiguring the rooms and common (public) areas. Give them a chance to regain some of their dignity. Their basic skills, like riding a bike or typing, will come back to them.
  4. Offer these workers future housing there, when the property opens for occupancy.
  5. Give the homeless residents a good reason to take care of their respective room, and the overall property.
  6. Keep the housing as simple and practical as possible. Recycle whatever furniture, desks, fixtures, appliances, window treatments, kitchen ware, dishes, etc. that are in good condition. Repaint, re-stain and refinish all surfaces.

 

By the way, expensive wallcoverings, flooring, furniture, and state-of-the-art systems are unnecessary. Research and reports about homeless shelter accommodations show that “pricier” amenities tend to make persons just off the streets nervous, self-conscious, apprehensive, distrustful, and even ill.

 

Every community has a “Symphony Sam.” A person who still possesses the skills and abilities, the passion, and the interest to give back! To get off the street! To once again become a more productive part of the universe.

 

Every community has do-able options to meet the dire housing needs of the homeless. Every community has at least one existing multi-unit property, that can be converted in a time-cost-manpower efficient manner.

 

Our local hotel GMs and their staffs can do only so much. They can help only so much. Their resources are very limited. Their ability to use their properties – which they do not own – is very, very limited.

 

What needs to happen to provide safe and clean housing for the “Symphony Sams” in our respective communities? To get this job done sooner than two to three years after they become statistics?

 

Local entities such as the Central Florida Coalition on Homeless and Central Florida Foundation (http://www.cffound.org) are proactive, and motivated.

 

Special projects such as the “Reconstruction of Housing for the Homeless in America Project” focus on providing safe housing promptly.

 

Professional and trade projects like the AIA’s new redesign/rebuild internship project tap young talent. Among other things, they offer fresh, new approaches to “reconfiguring and retrofitting” solid existing structures into great multi-occupancy housing.

 

What is your community doing to get your homeless adults and children, into safe and clean housing?

 

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“Best wishes for a healthy, safe and peaceful holiday season – and Year 2015.”

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

 

Painting It: A Multi-Family “Home for the Homeless.”

A church congregation purchased a 210-room, two-story hotel that was headed into foreclosure. Most of the property was in reasonably good condition.

 

Mission: Provide safe, clean “transitional-to-permanent” rooms for local homeless persons. The small restaurant on the property would be converted into main kitchen, and central dining area. The food court would be removed.

 

Immediate goal: Clean, repair and renovate the property to meet local codes, and to pass regular health and safety inspections.

 

Volunteers manned the entire project. Five groups of construction people worked on repairing and renovating the property to qualify for multi-family, private, non-profit housing.

 

Group 1. A retired architect volunteered his firm’s design/build capabilities. He did the renderings, and put the plan on paper. Two student interns handled the blueprinting, CAD, schematics, etc.

 

Group 2. An area construction project management company oversaw the project.

 

Group 3. Two church members served as co-general contractors. They handled the actual remodeling of the two buildings, including repairs and replacements, and the reconfiguration of the hotel rooms into efficiency apartments, minus kitchens.

 

Group 4. Local certified trades persons did much of the code-compliant work. They included: environmental remediation/mitigation specialists, carpenters and framers, drywallers, plumbers, electricians, heating/air conditioning specialists, insulation specialists, mechanical systems specialists, roofers, pool specialists, etc.

 

Group 5. Certified craftspersons handled interior and exterior surface repairs, prepping, and finishing. They included: painters and decorators, finishers, glazers; tile and carpet installers, landscapers and nursery experts, pavers, etc.

 

A church member’s son – one of the general contractors for the project – brought me on board. While in college, he had worked summers at the hotel. Bringing a new life – and fresh purpose – to the hotel was a labor of love for him. His “in-kind” donation to the community that had nurtured him from childhood into adulthood.

 

I had five bosses, simultaneously. And all of them worked as volunteers.

 

Employer 1. Church consistory, representing the congregation.

 

My job: Match church’s painting and decorating wishes to the property’s project needs. Help select a color scheme that was “restful”. . .”harmonious”. . .”cheerful”. . .”appealing to the average person.”

 

Employer 2. Architect.

 

My job: Read the blueprints. Using renderings for each area, match the color chips for paints, stains and finishes for all surfaces. Make color-coded order lists of products and materials. Estimate the quantities for each, adding 20 percent allowance for most items, as much as 50 percent for others. Help the interns develop painting and decorating spec sheets.

 

Employer 3.  Construction project management company superintendent.

 

My job: Help select project painters. Help the lead painter to (a) comparison cost-out and order all paint, materials and supplies, and tools not standardly a part of commercial painter’s tool kit; (b) set up written work assignments for each painting and finishing crew; (c) establish flexible duty schedule; and, (d) help identify and set up “in-kind” donations of paint-related products, materials, supplies, tools, and equipment.

 

Employer 4. Co-General contractors.

 

My job: Help “generals” put together painting and decorating prospectus. Help “generals” determine the needed painter and allied trades’ skill sets.

 

Employer 5. Hotel management.

 

My job: Help identify team members interested in future employment with the non-profit housing limited liability corporation. My assigned departmental list included: facilities/maintenance, groundskeeping, housekeeping, and outdoor activity areas.

 

None of my “jobs” required me to do any actual ordering and purchasing; and/or prepping, priming, painting, and finishing of any surface. The “employers” used local people to fill the spots in Groups 4 and 5 above.

 

At least one-third of the volunteer workers in Group 4 had been homeless. Nearly one-half in Group 5 were homeless.

 

One feature of the working arrangements for Groups 4 and 5 workers that had been homeless: They were given first-choice, priority residency in the complex once it was opened for occupancy.

 

On December 20, 2014, the complex will celebrate its one year anniversary. Everyone that worked on the project, located in the southeastern part of the United States, gained many things from the experience.

 

The greatest reward for the project’s volunteer leaders and craftspersons: Seeing over 52 homeless workers walk in those front doors, and watch them being escorted – individually – to their new homes.

 

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Read about “Symphony Sam” in the true-story, co-written blog to be posted on December 22-23, 2014.  An excerpt:

 

“My mother told me recently about Symphony Sam.’ That’s the name she gave the homeless man that played virtuoso-quality music on his violin, in Chicago’s Pedway. And, handed out free copies of the official Vietnam Veterans of America newspaper. . .”

 

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Have a friends-family-fun-filled holiday season.

Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

From Bob Hajtovik: Thanks for the Memories – and Opportunities!

My teammates and crew members, superintendents and managers, employers, and property owners have been among the best!  Hats off to each of them!

In alphabetical order, they are…

 

1. Construction Project Managers. They’ve handed the spec sheets to me, stepped back and let me get the job done. They’ve hired me to do high-performance and high-quality work.

They’ve relied on me to help bring in every project within, or better yet: under the time, cost and manpower terms of the contract with the customers and clients.

 

2. Contractors. They’ve told me what they needed done. They’ve handed me the reins, and left to take care of other things. They’ve offered relevant feedback promptly.  Consistently, yet “eyefully,” they’ve trusted my judgment.

They’ve kept me in the loop about a spectrum of things: problems, changes, shipment delays, switches in job sites, equipment failures, compliance courses, crew cutbacks, etc.

 

3. Hotel general managers, engineering directors, and property owners. They’ve recognized that I knew what I was doing. They’ve seen how I could help them meet their goals and satisfy expectations.

Usually, they’ve accepted, and agreed, with the way that I was doing the job they had hired me to do. Generally, they’ve known when to step back and watch, and when to step up and say something.

They’ve served as reliable guides and checkmates. They’ve served as both practical and ethics-driven mentors. They’ve provided sound examples of organizational, business, team, and project leadership.

 

 

4. Officers of non-profits. They’ve brought me on board because they’ve needed an experienced painter. They’ve wanted a painter that they could trust with   their constituents, community and property.

They’ve explained their unique situations, and asked for help. They’ve tapped my talents and resources to improve their facilities, benefit their organizations and enhance their capabilities to serve their constituents.

 

5. Teammates and fellow crew members. They’ve helped me fit in and belong to the group. They’ve shared – and entrusted me with – their ideas, concerns, and hopes.

They’ve asked for my help and advice. They’ve offered the same to me whenever it has been needed or appropriate. Whenever the spirit moved them, too. (Now, that’s “teaming-it!” )

They’ve challenged, tested and stretched me. They’ve frustrated, criticized and upset me.

They’ve doubled me over in laughter, and moved me to tears. They’ve supported, and empowered me. They’ve praised and appreciated me. They’ve made my day! Every day!

They’ve blessed my life by being a part of it – and letting me be a part of theirs.

 

How everyone has made a difference. . .

Everyone, represented in the list above, has helped me fit into his or her team, and organization. They’ve helped me become an active contributor to his or her organization.

They’ve offered opportunities that helped to mold me into a better person, helper and worker. A better painter and decorator for their respective needs, groups, environment, and property.

To my knowledge, all of my managers and teammates and crew members are still alive. Some have moved on to different companies or non-profits. Some have changed careers. Some have retired, and get in lots of golf, fishing, boating, travel, and family time. Some greet each day with at least one sign of “life over 40.”

All have maintained their professional interests, creative energy, high set of values, and unique personalities. And, definitely their sense of humor, fairness, accountability, and integrity!

 

Many thanks to everyone.
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Stay safe. Stay true. Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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