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Decorative Finishing: The Lacquer Table

My childhood home had been an antique shop previously, in the 1950s and early 1960s.

 

Luxurious oriental wallpaper – black silk textured panels – still covered the walls of the largest room. An elegantly dressed Geisha knelt in the center of one of the panels, bordered in etched goldleafing.

 

All of the wallpaper was faded and worn from age. Each panel bore the signs of water damage.

 

On the longest wall was depicted a Teahouse scene. A dainty china tea service set on the low, glass-smooth black lacquer table. For seating, large silk-covered pillows were arranged on the floor. Rice paper sliding door panels could be seen in the background.

 

I did my homework, seated in a red-enameled, round-backed cane chair. Pulled up to a restored circa 1940s oblong, drop leaf table. My wandering eyes floated toward that Teahouse scene. Specifically, the lacquered table.

 

I promised myself that I’d decorate my first dining room in the oriental style.

 

In my early 20s, the inspiration came to design and build a small Oriental table, out of ebony wood.

To get the perfect black, lustrous finish, I applied nine coats of Glidden’s high-gloss enamel. Each coat was allowed to set and “cure,” at least four hours. Then, I did a light and thorough damp feather sanding with No. 1000 sandpaper. Followed by a complete surface “wipe,” using a barely damp, soft muslin cloth.

 

In 2010, the need for a laptop computer table motivated me to build a “lap table” sized version of that lacquer table. I did not apply as many coats of the black, high-gloss finish enamel, because of the lack of workshop space. And, the curing/drying time between coats was reduced – according to outdoor environmental conditions.

 

The mystique remained for the sleek, elegant oriental décor. Yet, a deeper appreciation for the natural in furniture finishing, refinishing, and restoration work had taken over.

 

In early 2013, a couple from Asia stayed at the hotel for over ten days. They were purchasing a second home in Celebration. They showed me two photos of a badly abused, 52-inch square table that came with the house.

 

The couple wanted to shorten the oak table, to 20-inches in height. Then, they wanted to refinish the table. To a mirror-smooth black lacquer. They wanted to do the entire project themselves. With a little guidance from me.

 

The husband and wife team turned out to be very talented. And handy with tools – painting, decorative finishing, and power.

 

One day after work, we met at their new house. A sprawling two-story, with many porches and balconies.

Using a level and steel ruler, we measured and marked the table legs for shortening. By my next visit, the couple had sawed down the legs. Also, they’d carefully cleaned and sanded every inch of the table.

 

At their request, we actually video-cammed the basic procedure:

 

  1. Repairing the table’s cracks, gouges, splinters, etc.
  2. Filling and smoothing out all surface imperfections.
  3. Dry and moist sanding the surfaces multiple times.
  4. Applying a very thin white sealer/primer.
  5. Applying five of the nine finish coats – with very fine, and gentle, sanding between each.

 

By the time the couple applied the fifth finish coat themselves, my job was completed. They had mastered the finishing process, at a high, non-professional level.

 

I never saw the finished Lacquer table. Until June of 2015. The couple and I spotted each other at a Home Depot. They invited me to their home the following week.

 

Upon my arrival, they urged me to take a very close look at their work.

 

“What a beautiful job!” I excitedly told them. And it was!

 

At their beautiful table, they served tea and homemade shortbread wafers, on a set of hand-painted china.

 

By the way, the Lacquer table sets in the middle of their traditional, oriental dining room. In their traditional, oriental decorated home.

 

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Some of the best decorative finishing is done by the most surprising craftspersons.

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Thank you, Tau Hong and Sum Li.

And, thank you everyone for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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Renovating It: 108-Room Hotel

Cousins in the Indianapolis area purchased a 108-room hotel that needed a complete renovation. Structurally, both buildings were solid. No rotting, cracks, holes, breaks, etc.

 

The improvements could be made in stages. So the new owners decided to follow the wild suggestion of the drywall foreman under the construction management company:

 
“Replace nothing that still works, or can be restored. Unless it does not meet code…”

 

STAGE ONE: Bringing the entire property up to code.

 

This has required a large outlay of capital.

  1. New roof on the two building.
  2. New plumbing (copper tubing.
  3. New wiring, switches, sockets, plugs.
  4. Replacement of all A/C window units, and repair and rebuilding of main A/C systems on roofs.
  5. Replacement of stair and corridor steel railings and banisters.
  6. Resurfacing of pool and replacement of heaters.
  7. New security system, including videocam surveillance and computer systems.
  8. Replacement of one half of all wall joists and drywall in each front office.
  9. Replacement of two-thirds of all wall joists and drywall in each of seventy guest rooms.
  10. Repair and replacement of kitchen equipment.

 

STAGE TWO: Getting the hotel ready for occupancy.

  1. New carpeting in guest rooms and all public areas.
  2. Ceramic tile cleaning, repairing and polishing in 108 guest baths.
  3. New wi-fi wiring and routing system.
  4. Furniture repair and refurbishment in all guest rooms and public areas.
  5. Cabinetry and counter repair and re-laminating in all guest rooms.
  6. Fixture cleaning and restoration in all guest rooms, public areas and meeting rooms.
  7. Landscape revitalizations: clearing out, pruning, replanting, etc.
  8. Re-asphalting, striping and marking of parking and no-parking areas.

 

STAGE THREE: Repainting and refinishing of all exterior and interior surfaces.

  1. Cleaning and repairing of al wood and concrete surfaces.
  2. Prepping all surfaces: filling, patching, sanding, etc.
  3. Priming all metal surfaces, new lumber, bare metal, and stripped surfaces.
  4. Priming all new drywall and floating seams between new and existing drywall sections.
  5. Spray painting exterior walls, floors, doors, etc.
  6. Spray varnishing and clear coating all exterior wood decking, benches, built-in seating, fences, railings, signage frames, etc.
  7. Brushing or rolling of all fascia and trims.
  8. Popcorn spraying interior ceilings of front lobby, halls, offices, restaurant, public rooms, and meeting rooms.
  9. Spray painting all interior ceilings, walls, doors and trim in guest rooms and public areas.
  10. Brushing/rolling interior trim, wainscoting, baseboard, etc.
  11. Refinishing all wood cabinetry, shelving, mirror frames.
  12. Refinishing all wood furniture in public areas, also restaurant and two meeting rooms.

 

STAGE FOUR: Decorative finishing and covering of select areas.

  1. Marbleizing tops of tables in lobby, office reception area, meeting rooms’ central lounge.
  2. Installing wallpaper on back rotunda wall of front desk area.
  3. Faux finishing one wall in each bathroom of front office wing.
  4. Installing commercial grade wall vinyl in all public restrooms.
  5. Installing Indy-500 3-D scenic mural on main corridor of wall entering restaurant.

 

The 108-room hotel will reopen on November 1, 2017, in time for the holidays.

 

Several new, alluring amenities will grace the premises:

  1. Cyber library and graphics studio.
  2. Children’s WI -FI, 3-D “Pit Stop” studio.
  3. Self-service snack/night bar = foods, non-alcoholic beverages.
  4. Self-service laundry and dry cleaning center.
  5. Enclosed meditation flower garden and bird and butterfly sanctuary.

 

Terry, the oldest of the cousins in this new venture, becomes very animated when he talks about the hotel. At 54, he says that he has been learning many new lessons during “this exciting process.”

 

A few facts: Approximate cost of Stages 1-3: $2.1 million:

 

Construction management company: Over 30 years hotel/resort renovation experience.

Subcontractors: Selected per industry recommendations. No bidding.

Project tradespersons: All hired through respective local union offices.

New staff painter/decorator: Selected from painting crews that have worked on the project.

 

Question: How many other smaller hotels need a fresh, new start in life?

 

My belief: Older commercial properties hold just as much promise as older houses.

 

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Revitalizing and reusing older properties and structures deserves more of our attention.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting Patterns: Giant Chessboard – Part II

In “Painting Patterns: Giant Chessboard – Part I,” posted February 10, 2o16, we covered a giant chessboard project that turned into a huge mess.

 

Here, we cover how the unique project – exterior driveway and courtyard, and interior main hallway, of a retired Chess champion’s large residence — was re-done. Beautifully! And right!

 

HOW THE PROJECT GOT STRAIGHTENED OUT

 

** A new paint crew came on board, and started from step one. **

 

 

PREP WORK OF ALL SURFACES

 

1. Lightly sanded driveway, courtyard and hallway.

2. Re-measured all three areas; then re-gridded surfaces, locating axis and connection points.

 

EXTERIOR AREAS – Driveway and Courtyard

 

1. Sprayed S-W 30 Seconds Outdoor Painter’s Prep Cleaner (124-7485) onto both surfaces.

2. Hosed off both areas. Let dry completely (4 hours).

3.  Sprayed H&C Concrete Etch Solution onto driveway and courtyard areas.

4. Plumb-lined, then taped grid lines and block edges. Tape: ScotchBlue 2097; 2090.

5. Labeled Autumn Brown and Natural Tan blocks, on grid. Used color-coded tapes.

6. Cut in, then painted Tan blocks on driveway. H&C Concrete Solid Color Stain/Sealer, S-B.

— Two, 2-men teams worked from center of each row outward, in opposite direction.

— First man on team cut in, then second filled in blocks. Rollers: 3/8 in. nap by 3 in., and 9 in.

7. Cut in, then painted Autumn Brown blocks. Followed technique used in No. 5.

8. Rolled first coat of H&C Concrete Sealer Wet Look on driveway. Rollers: ¼ in. nap x 12 inch.

9. Cut in, then painted courtyard chessboard: Natural Tan blocks, then Autumn Brown.

10. Rolled on first coat H&C Concrete Sealer Wet Look onto courtyard. Roller: ¼ in. nap x 12 in.

— Let surface dry for 24 hours.

11. Rolled on second coat of H&C Wet Look. SharkGrip Slip Resistant Additive mixed in paint.

12. Sprayed one coat of H&C Concrete & Driveway Protector onto both surfaces.

 

INTERIOR AREA – Floor/Main Hallway

 

1. Covered hallway walls with 4-mil plastic sheeting; ceiling with 6-mil.

— Used special masking tape; walls papered in Grass Cloth.

2. Smooth-sanded wood floor, using graduated grit disks, 400-to-1000, on orbital sander.

— Thoroughly vacuumed after each grit sanding.

3. Primed with S-W Multi-purpose (wood)*. Roller: ¼ in. nap x 12 in. roller. * Primer optional.

4. Plumb-lined, then taped grid lines and block edges. Used T-square to “square” all corners.

Tape: ScotchBlue 2090/Orig. Multi-use; 2080EL/Advanced Delicate.

5. Labeled Meadow Brown and Naturel Tan blocks, from axis out. Used color-coded tape.

6. Cut in, then painted Tan blocks, front doorway to back entry.

Paint: S&W Porch and Floor Enamel. Brushes: 1 ½ in./angled; Rollers: 3/8 in. nap x 9 in.

7. Cut in, then painted Meadow Brown blocks. Brushes, rollers: Same as for Tan blocks

8. Let area dry for 24 hours.

9. Gently “glass-sanded” floor; carefully vacuumed immediately.

10. “Fan-sprayed” on Sherwin-Williams MinWax Polyurethane, semi-gloss clear.

NOTE: Everyone on the team closely followed paint manufacturers’ instructions for each product.

 

WHO DID RE-DO PROJECT

 

1. 5 Journey-level painters, including foreman;* also 1 apprentice.

— 5 experienced in application of specialty exterior products.

— 1 also highly skilled decorative painter/finisher – interior work.

* Note: Journey foreman also served as project manager, with over 21 years of experience.

 

HOW LONG RE-DO PROJECT TOOK

 

1. Prep work: 3 days.

2. Painting: 8 days.

3. Clean-up: 1 full day.

* Note: Time did not include “rained out” days. (There were four.)

 

WHAT PAINT PRODUCTS WERE USED – A Summary

 

* Exterior surfaces: Sherwin-Williams 30 Seconds Outdoor Painter’s prep Cleaner; S-W H&C Concrete Etch Solution; S-W H&C Concrete Solid Color Stain/Sealer, solvent-based; S-W H&C Concrete Sealer Wet Look (topcoat); S-W H&C SharpGrip Slip-Resistant Additive; S-W H&C Concrete & Driveway Protector.

* Interior surface: S-W Multi-Purpose (wood) Primer; S-W Porch and Floor Enamel, satin: Meadow Trail (Brown), Naturel Tan; S-W MinWax Polyurethane Super Fast Dry, semi-gloss.

 

WHAT PROJECT COST – Approximate

 

1. Original estimate:   Paint: $5,200 Labor: $ 2,400 Total: $7,600

2. Rescue/Re-Do cost: Paint Products: $15,043.83 Labor: $10,060 Total: 25,103.83*

* Does not include cost for tools and supplies.

3. ** Owner cost: Paint: $0.00; Supplies: $0.00; Labor: $0.00; Legal fees: $4,000. Total: $4,000

** Final figures, after settlement.

 

See upcoming post: “Chessboard Project Supplies Chart and Computations.”

 

WHO PAID FOR PROJECT RE-DO

 

Final decision: “Split responsibility.” Real estate company that “subcontracted” job to painting contractor, that employed first two painters. * Original paint crew’s work was not guaranteed.

 

HOW DIFFICULT “CHESSBOARD” WAS TO STRAIGHTEN OUT

 

“It could have been worse,” said the paint foreman/project manager, a retired IUPAT member from N.W. Indiana. He’d moved to Florida in 1995 to get the opportunity to work on “extreme, detail projects.” I have to say: That guy was really in his element. And, an amazing craftsman!

 

How I was involved in project

 

Found paint foreman/project manager, helped identify crew members; helped with product selection, surface testing, and estimating; advised about layout, gridding, and procedures. (My services were gratis. A family friend of property owner.)

 

See upcoming post: “Chessboard Project Supplies Chart and Computations.”

 

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Complicated jobs are nothing more than simple jobs with more steps.

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Have a safe and satisfying day, everyone. And, many thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: Paint Brush Budgeting

 

The realm of paint brushes is varied and highly specialized. This, of course, depends on the surface you are painting.

 

At the bottom are the chip brushes. They are low in quality and price, and also disposable if you choose not to clean them.

 

Located at the top are the faux finishing brushes. They can be expensive. And, they are designed for specific surfaces, materials, and effects.

 

Generally, if you care at all about the final results of your work you will choose the most appropriate and highest quality tool available for the job.

 

In some cases, the purchase of a brush should be viewed as an investment. That’s especially true when the cost reaches in excess of two hundred dollars.

 

When it comes to a typical good quality brush, expect to pay anywhere between fourteen and twenty three dollars.

 

Why the difference in cost? Brushes are specialized tools. They are manufactured using different types of materials and processes. The cost of the brush depends on what went into making it.

 

List of typical brushes, their material and their designated use:

 

  1. Nylon: Use with latex products only.
  2. Nylon/Polyester: Use with waterborne and oil based products.
  3. China Bristle: Use with oil, epoxy, and polyurethane based products.
  4. Badger: Use with oil-based paints and glazes.
  5. Sable: Use with acrylic latex products.

 

Paint Brushes in a Commercial Sense

 

Residential, decorative, commercial, and industrial painting each require a variety of brushes to complete  the task, and project.

 

Residential painting and decorating, often considered to be more specialized, can incorporate the use of fine artist brushes to larger size brushes for big wall painting on drywall, masonry and so on.

 

Decorative painting and decorating, considered the most specialized in the field, incorporates a wide variety of specially designed fine artist and creative brushes, also other applications tools.

 

Commercial painting and decorating is designated by the use of waterborne and solvent born products. Here, you use brushes primarily for high production purposes.

 

Industrial painting usually requires the use of specialized types of coatings. Thus, brushes containing natural hair are used. Example: China bristle,the main choice.

 

An old adage applies here: ”You get what you pay for.”

 

In any sense, look for a brush where the bristles are (1) tightly compacted and (2) tapered at the end. This makes for a quality brush. One which holds a reasonable volume of paint and produces very fine cut lines.

 

JOURNEY PAINTER’S TIP: You will be using most of your brushes quite often. So, it is important to have a brush which feels real good in your hand.

 

Don’t laugh. I once used a brush which caused my hand to ache every time I used it. Finally, I beveled the handle, sanded it and applied a polyurethane clear coat. It turned out to be better than new.

 

Remember: Buy only the best brush that you can, when quality is your greatest concern. Besides, a $25.00 brush can last a long time. Especially, if you treat the brush right!

 

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Don’t forget: Your teeth aren’t the only important items that need brushing.

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”
Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

PAINTING AND DECORATING: THE HOTEL PENTHOUSE

A Central Florida hotel gave me the choice of three redecorating projects:

 

  1. larger penthouse,
  2. front lobby, or
  3. outdoor children’s play-town.

 

I opted for the penthouse. The other two projects were put on hold by the property management company.

 

Why the penthouse project got my vote: The diversity of creative decorating opportunities.

 

  1. Interior work – A/C, controlled environment.
  2. Fine finishing surfaces: paneling, columns, furniture.
  3. Lots of wallcovering installation, including mural.
  4. Custom color matching: paint-to-patterned wallcoverings.
  5. Faux finishing.
  6. Minimal traffic
  7. Management’s style, commitment and candor.

 

I scheduled the project into twelve main phases:

 

  1. Needs assessment by room, area, square footage, surface conditions, and preparation requirements.
  2. Products, materials, supplies costing-to-budget allotment; selection and coordination; quantity estimating and computation; requisitioning to purchasing.
  3. Wood furniture and woodwork stripping or bleaching.
  4. Wallcovering removal.
  5. Ceilings, walls, doors repairing, patching, filling.
  6. Wood repairing, filling, sanding, sealing.
  7. Ceilings, walls priming.
  8. Woodwork, doors, furniture re-staining and light sanding.
  9. Painting.
  10. Woodwork, doors, furniture finishing.
  11. Wallpaper and mural hanging.
  12. Faux finishing.

 

I was responsible for all aspects of the project except:

 

  1. delivery delays of custom wallcoverings and murals,
  2. purchasing department delays, errors, etc.

 

The one twist: The hotel president’s wife, a retired ASID member, would be included in the selection of the wallcoverings, and murals. In reality, the lady showed up on site once a week during the entire project. She put herself “to work.” She helped whichever hotel maintenance technician may have been assisting me on that day.

 

The project moved right along.
Complete shutdown was needed only two days – carpenter, plumber, tile man. The flooring people installed new carpeting after I completed my work. Note: I waited to re-install the re-finished baseboards until after the flooring was installed.

 

A FEW TIPS FOR ANY SIMILAR PROJECT THAT YOU MAY BE CONSIDERING

 

Before you sign on, you might want to do the following:

 

  1. Find out where the hotel’s purchasing manager orders the bulk of paint products and wallpaper materials.
  2. Clear with management – get it in writing – for YOU to be the person that visits the paint store and communicates with product/material representatives.
  3. Set it up so that YOU are the person that puts together the actual requisition order schedule and lists, for the purchasing manager to follow.
  4. Get a list – in writing – of all other work that will be taking place in the area. See that it includes the approximate “schedule blocks” of work days for every other craftsperson. Examples: carpenters, electricians, plumbers, tile installers, drywall installers.

 

BEST CASE SCENARIO:

 

  1. Hotel management sets it up and authorizes YOU to actually do the ordering from suppliers.
  2. You work under ONE member of management.
  3. You have access to other members of organization – supervisors, managers, staff – as needed.
  4. Feedback from managers is limited, and direct. No filtering through a chain of people.
  5. Project inspections are limited, and conducted by person(s) with authority to assist and act.
  6. “Sightseeing” visits by managers and staff members are kept to minimum, even discouraged.

 

HOW THINGS WENT:

  1. The hotel’s staff was friendly, helpful and totally enthusiastic. Especially the staff painter, and the engineering department, as a whole.
  2. The project came off without any major glitch – eg. shipment delay of custom wallcoverings.
  3. The project came in under budget – a surprise, even to me.
  4. The project was completed one week early. (Another surprise.)
  5. The carpenters, electricians, plumbers, drywallers, and tile installers stuck to the master schedule – and theirs. Great teams!
  6. Final inspections came off with only minor changes.
  7. The hotel management company signed off promptly.
  8. The hotel’s principal owner flew in for a final walk-through – and “staff only open house.”

 

Would I pick that “penthouse project” again? Yes! Though it was the first one that I’d worked on solo. And, it was the largest: over 4,000 square feet, including the veranda.

 

TIP FOR TOP QUALITY INTERIOR FINISHERS:

 

Ask around. There’s bound to be a hotel, resort, or residential penthouse somewhere that needs your special, fine touch. If nothing else, offer to help the staff painter get it into shining shape again.

 

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Special thanks to everyone that has helped others do a great job at their chosen work.

And, thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: Classic Marbleizing

Marble Faux Finished Lamp Table

The Marble finish represents the finest decorative application that can be achieved. In the 18th century, the artist guilds throughout Europe studied and simulated the wide varieties of quarried stone for the purpose of interior design.

 

Today, faux marble has been recognized as the most creative style to master. It is one of the most fascinating decorative forms to learn and apply.

 

Here are some recommended fundamental skills and tools of the trade to use for marbleizing.

 

SKILLS:

  1. Ability to perceive depth in three dimensions.
  2. Sensitive flexible touch.
  3. Sense of applying realism to a simulated form.
  4. Ability to combine random transparent textures.
  5. Ability to apply a variety of finishes using a variety of application methods.

 

TOOLS:

  1. Badger Hair blending brush, 3 or 4 inch          7. Sea sponges, small and larg
  2. Bright brush, # 7 or # 8                                        8. Goose feather
  3. Chiqueteur brush (special/optional)                  9. Cheesecloth
  4. Filbert brush, #1 and #2                                       10. Newspaper
  5. Flat brush, #10 or #12                                           11. Tack rags (2+)
  6. Spalter brush, 3 or 4 inch

 

THE METHOD OF MARBLEIZING

 

Marbleizing simply means a “simulation of marble.” And, it is done by replicating the same elements of composition, which are found inside the actual Marble itself.

 

You see it with your eyes, visualize it and reproduce it on the surface you have selected.

 

THE GENERAL STEPS TO ACHIEVE YOUR MARBLEIZED FINISH:

 

  1. The surface needs to be smooth and blemish free. Sand and patch accordingly – #120, then #220.
  2. Apply a suitable primer, using a low nap roller cover. When dry, sand surface smooth.
  3. Apply a basecoat, which has the appropriate background color of the genuine Marble.
  4. Sand the surface smooth with #320, then #400 sandpaper.
  5. Apply the first glaze color with a sponge, creating a wide criss-cross pattern. Blend into the surrounding basecoat, leaving random darkened areas.
  6. Apply the second glaze color with a sponge, overlapping the first application. Blend randomly. Leave some areas more heavily textured and other areas less textured.
  7. Mix the glaze color for the veins. Use a Sable Liner brush to create veins in random vertical and  irregular horizontal configuration. Blend edges of veins randomly.
  8. Mix a dark color glaze. Use a small and stiff Flat brush – eg. #8 or #10 – to finely splatter the surface in random locations.
  9. Apply a clear coat varnish or polyurethane to the surface, using a Spalter brush or a low nap roller. When dry, sand the surface with #400 sandpaper.
  10. Tack rag, and reapply a finish coat.

 

Note: The steps and tools to be used vary, depending on the type of Marble that you are trying to simulate.

 

THINGS TO REMEMBER:

 

  1. Glazes can be applied using either latex or oil based products.
  2. Keep tools and brushes clean.
  3. Always maintain a flexible approach and view when applying a decorative finish.
  4. Sand surfaces between each coat, when an ultra smooth surface is desired.
  5. Mask and cover all areas not to be finished.

 

SKILLS TIP:  When in doubt about your skills, test them. Make up several sample boards.

 

DECORATING TIP: Think creatively, and perceptively.

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SPRING into action. MARBLEIZE something!   Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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