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Posts tagged ‘Decorative painting tools’

Paintshop: Decorative Painting Brushes and Tools

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DECORATIVE PAINTING TOOLS in PHOTO ABOVE.*

 

No. 1. Steel combs. Uses: Dragging, wood graining.

No. 2. Palette knife. Uses: Mixing artist’s acrylics or oils; scraping away paint, glaze in areas.

No. 3. Dragging Brush/overgrainer. Features: natural bristles one side, thick nylon bristles other.

No. 4. Badger-hair Brush. Uses: Smoothing oil glaze.

No. 5. Long-haired Spalter. Size 80. Uses: Smoothing oil glaze.

No. 6. Short-haired Spalter. Size 100. Uses Applying oil glaze, then smoothing it.

Nos. 7-8. Small Spalter/Mottlers. Sizes 40, 50. Uses: Wood graining, smoothing oil glaze.

Nos. 9-10. Toothed Spalters. Special oil brushes. Uses: Wood graining.

Nos. 11-12. Small, flat Brush/white nylon. Uses:Marbling, touch-ups, freehand painting acrylics.

No. 13. Small pointed round Brush/white bristles. Uses: Touch-ups, thicker veining marbling techniques with acrylics.

No. 14. Flat long-haired Brush/nylon. Uses: Marbling, fine detailing in acrylics.

No. 15. Long-haired Brush/nylon. Uses: Marbling with acrylics.

No. 16. Small pointed Brush/nylon. Uses Fine veining when marbling with acrylics.

No. 17. Long-haired Ox-Hair Brush. Uses: Marbling, woodgraining, freehand script and ornamentation (lines of varying thicknesses). TIP: Best with oils.

Nos. 18-19. Flat, White Bristle Brush. Uses: Marbling, woodgraining, corner touch-ups with oil-or-water-based paints.

No. 20. Flat long-haired Badget Lettering Brush. Uses: Marblig, freehand painting. TIP: Oils.

No. 21. Ox-hair Sign Painter’s Brush. Features: Long-hair cut flat at end. Uses: Marbling, freehand (for clean edges) in oils or acrylics.

Nos. 22-24. Stencil Brush. Feature: White bristles, slightly softer. Uses: With oils or acrylics.

No. 25. Round/oval thick nylon Brush. Uses: Spattering; coating thin, curved surfaces.

No. 26. Flat nylon Brush. Uses: Paint latex base coat, also acrylic glazes; baseboards, chiseling.

No. 27. Angled nylon Brush/nylon. A better quality brush. “Pre-used” in factory, leaves fewer marks. Uses: Latex painting, cutting in lines, hard-to-reach surfaces.

No. 28. Small flat, long-haired Brush/white bristles Uses: Oil paints.

No. 29. Flat 2 1/2–inch Brush/white bristles. Uses: Oil-base coating; squared-off ends; general purpose; precision edges,/trims.

Nos. 30-32. Round Bristles/white. Uses: Oil glazing; oil-based painting. TIP: Use separate brushes for separate functions.

No. 33. Well-worn round Brush. Uses: Stirring paints.

 


Decorative painting can create warm, personal spaces from bland, contemporary walls. It can create focal points out of any surface such as doors, trim, woodwork, even ceilings. It can create masterful heirlooms from worn, discarded furniture. It can transform jeweled and gold-leafed treasures from thrift shop and yard sale finds.

 

Decorative painting – creating the “right surfaces” – can make a room, area or piece come alive.

 

  1. Underscore or downplay its assets, and camouflage its drawbacks.
  2. Add new life, a new feel.
  3. Blend the old with the new – family antiques with store bargains.
  4. Make newer surfaces appear very aged, hundred-to-centuries old.
  5. Create a special, and different, touch with every applications, every tool on every surface.

 

With decorative painting, you can create a signature piece from every piece.

Decorative painting differs from standard interior painting in three distinct ways:

 

  1. Paints used. On top of two layers of interior paint, you apply two thin coats of transparent paint – “Glaze” – that you mix, then tint to the desired hue.
  2. Colors. At the heart of decorative painting, especially when carefully chosen and properly mixed. Produced by blending wet paints on palette, then placing translucent layers atop an opague base/ Result: Resonance, depth, a subtle glow as mixing.
  3. Pattern. The way you apply glaze contributes to uniqueness of each application. Using a wide array of tools, multiple shapes and sizes. You manipulate the glaze while wet to form patterns or different broken-color effects (eg. ragging, combing, sponging, flogging).

 

Decorative painting calls for creativity, skill, and patience. It alls for paint and finishing products that suit the surface and areas. It calls for the appropriate tools to achieve the desired pattern, texture, finish, and effect.

 

IS DECORATIVE PAINTING A GOOD OPTION FOR A SURFACE WHERE YOU PAINT?

 

Are guests of your hotel ready for unique surroundings and surface embellishments?

Are the patients and staff of your hospital looking for alternatives to the opague paint colors on the walls and in public areas?

Are your commercial clients seeking a personalized alternative to wallpaper?

Or, does your private customer want something other than the area rug to dress up a wood floor?

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* Photo and descriptions from: Recipe for Surfaces: Decorating Paint Finishes Made Simple. Text by Mindy Drucker and Pierre Finkelstein.** Photographs by Tony Cenicola. Copyright 1993, Quarto Inc., Fireside Books, Simon and Schuster, N.Y., pp. 42-43.

Mindy Drucker is a freelance writer, specializing in design and home decoration topics. Pierre Finkelstein is a master decorative painter. He is recognized worldwide for his skill in applying standard, matching existing and creating custom finishes. Born in Paris, he owns Grand Illusion Decorative Painting, Inc., New York City.

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“Painting with Bob” appreciates that you are following.
Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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