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Painter’s View: How to find something to like about every boss or employer

Ground rule: Expect, demand and require nothing more from someone else than you would ask of yourself.

 

 

EMPLOYER

 

1. What matters the most to him or her here?

2. What three things does he or she do very well?

3. What one thing do you envy about him or her?

4. In a room of 100 bosses, what would make your boss stand out?

5. Name two ways that your boss walks the talk.

6. Name two things he or she does to cover the backs of every person under his charge.

7. Is your boss a good everyday leader?

8. Does your boss help each worker to understand that he or she has something special to contribute here?

9. Does your boss trust and delegate as a habit?

10. Does your boss know when to listen, learn, lead, or follow? And, do it?

11. Does your boss value the wisdom of his or her workers?

12. Does your boss recognize that his workers know what’s what?

13. Does your boss teach and show others how to make smart decisions and take decisive action?

14. Does your boss value his or her entire team?

15. Does your boss invite or encourage every worker to bring solutions for problems?

16. What part of his or her attitude, behavior, and approach moves you to emulate?

17. How does your boss remove obstacles that may prevent his or her workers from doing their jobs?

18. Does your boss work together with his or her people?

19. Does your boss really care about each of his or her workers?

20. Does your boss empower his or her workers to do what is right?

21. How does your boss wow every worker?

22. Instead of ordering his or her people to do things, does your boss grab an oar and row with them?

23. Does your boss know when to lead, when to follow, and when to get out of the way? And, does he or she do it?

 

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It takes each of us to make a difference for all of us!

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Thank you to all bosses that hang in there, do their jobs, and treat their people like they matter.

 

And, thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

“ERIK, G.M.”

Erik (not real name) had been the hotel’s general manager for over twenty-two years. I’d been told that he’d worked his way up from front desk clerk.

 

Few persons knew that his first job with the hotel had been “maintenance man.” When the engineering department consisted of three persons: engineer, painter and maintenance worker.

 

Erik learned the hotel business – hands-on – from the ground up. Literally. Without a college degree to back him up.

 

He had worked in nearly every department during his career. Thus, he possessed more than a basic awareness of each department’s function, and each worker’s job description.

 

Erik was one G.M. that a hotel staff/team member could not fool. He was one G.M. that every staff member could count on to understand what he or she was talking about, and was up against.

 

More than likely, Erik had been there, too.

 

We met in 2005, when I worked on two painting projects at his hotel. Erik got upset because one of the sub-contractors came to the site every day, and yelled – “bullied” – his own men.

 

One morning, Erik must have had enough. When my contractor came around and criticized my buddy’s and my paperhanging, he was confronted by the G.M., and two men wearing expensive dark suits.

 

In May, I received an email from Erik, through linkedin.com. Now retired, he said that he’d heard about the most recent job offer back at my old hotel. He gave his “30-second staff sales pitch.”

 

What shouldn’t have surprised me was how much he knew about that hotel’s operations. About the painting work that needed to be done there. Also, about the hotel painter’s job with any hotel.

 

Erik’s second starting job at his hotel had been “painter.” In fact, he had set up the paint shop there. He had established its “job description.” He had stocked its inventory shelves. He had written the guidelines that every painter since him has followed.

 

He told me something else that shouldn’t have surprised me either. His first job at – not with – his hotel was as a painter. A card-carrying IUPAT/IBPAT member, employed by a union commercial contractor in the area.

 

“Talking shop” with Erik has been a tremendous experience. He has been able to offer feedback from many vantage points within a hotel organization. Including as general manager, and painter.

 

Being able to “talk shop” with someone like Erik has been a well-timed gift!

 

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“A kind, gracious problem-solving attitude can save years of tears.”  Anonymous

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.” Copyright 2015. Robert Hajtovik. All rights reserved

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