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Posts tagged ‘Facilities’

More Custom Carriers for Painter’s Tools

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Upcoming Blog Topics for 2016

Hello, Everyone,

Looking forward to a new year full of opportunities – and challenges (of course)?
How about checking in here, when schedule permits? And picking up tips to help your painting job easier?

 

10 Upcoming Topics…

 

1. Building a Spray Booth: Affordable Options.

A. The Portable

B. The Recyclable Space

 

2. Hotel Painting Tips for Engineering/Maintenance Techs: An Update.

 

3. Spraying Dos, Don’ts, and Maybes.

 

4. Painting Methods: Adapting for Ability Changes.

 

5. Painting Methods: Adapting for Environmental Changes and Challenges.

 

6. Painting Methods: Adapting for Property/Structural Changes.

 

7. Painting Methods: Adapting for Company Policy Changes.

 

8. Our Brain’s Memory: The Basics.

 

9. Memories Are Made of This: Four Main Types.

 

10. Our Brain’s Memory: At Our Workplace.

 

Painting and decorating offers a full spectrum of creative opportunities. Even in pursuing the most mundane tasks. And, embarking on the most exciting new projects. Enjoy them all!

 

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Painting Them: Restaurants, Clubs and Bars in Hotels and Resorts.

Places where people go to relax or have fun vary in theme, design, and atmosphere. They can be uplifting, heart pounding, eclectic, luxurious, earthy and natural, or any other unique effect.

 

Each atmosphere has a style all its own. And, hopefully, it is appropriate to the type of public the dining and social amenities want to attract.

 

The design and painting of a “restaurant “can include the following features, depending on the overall theme of the area:

 

1. Soft earth tones blended with matte black accents.

 

2. Wood veneer “paneling” and wainscoting with mitered moldings.

 

3. Ceilings painted in off white or pastel beiges.

 

4. Faux finishing applications such as gold leafing and marbleizing.

 

5. Textured wall finishes such as Venetian plaster.

 

When designing and painting a “club,” here are some suggestions:

 

1. In a “bright” club setting, bright and flashing lights mean brilliant flashy colors.

 

2. In a “bohemian” setting, subtle and complementary earth tone finishes set the mood.

 

3. In an “electrifying” setting, a combination of colors sets the pace – eg. reds with purples, and blues with silvers.

 

4. Use “high intensity graphics” with simulated chrome appearance, possibly neons and metallic transparent finishes.

 

The design and painting of a “bar” can incorporate the following options:
1. A bar, which is “relaxing” and conducive to quiet conversation, has a subdued atmosphere. Using darker earth tone colors with moderately dark stain paneled woods is optimal.

 

2. In a bar full of electricity and a fast beat, use bright and reflective colors.

 

3. For ceiling styles, consider a “traditionally finished metal pan ceiling.” Nostalgia can provide a very relaxing and comfortable environment.

 

4. In any case, the bar itself needs to be one “focal point.” Design it with wood paneling, stained in a moderately dark color and finished in a matte sheen of durable vanish or polyurethane. Any molding can be highlighted by finishing with a light oak stain, enhanced by a gloss clear finish.

 

Atmosphere is everything. Patrons will enjoy their meals or drinks much more where they feel at home, almost as much if they were there.

 

Design and paint, that are selected, blended and served right, always go well with food and drink!

 

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Enjoy a little bit of heaven at your favorite spot. Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

 

Painting It: Game Room Fun

When a person plays a game in an arcade or game room, he or she pays little attention to what the walls or other surfaces look like. One sees how the space is designed, and what colors have been used,. Whether entering the room, or standing back from the game equipment and devices.

 

The games attract the primary attention. Thus, the overall decorative scheme is never crucial to the enjoyment of the amenities there.

 

Add a few special touches. And, your game room will appear more exciting to the average player, and the novice, too.

 

The following touches are sure to raise some eyebrows:

 

* Paint the ceiling a Chalk White. It reflects light, and makes it easier to see the games.

Special effect: Add glitter to quart of the white paint. Then, use 2-inch brush to create “streaks” across the ceiling. Example: On one project, I ran “streaks” from the center ceiling fixture, outward to corners and half-point.

 

* Paint the walls a dark color. Examples: Royal Blue, Violet, Hunter Green. It creates a subdued, laid back effect.

Special touch: Add glitter to the walls. Create a cosmic-like effect. Note: Do walls OR ceiling.

 

* Paint the walls Bright, Snow or Soft White. Use semi-gloss or gloss paint.

Special touches: Paint stripes and/or graphics. Create an energizing sports design.

 

* Apply a decorative finish to add special benefits. Example: Create a multi-layered effect, or textured surface. Game playing becomes very imaginative, because of the visual effects in the room.

 

* Get creative with the floor covering. Choose a design and color combo that adds excitement to the overall theme, and purpose, of the room.

 

FIVE FUN WAYS TO USE CARPETING:

 

1. Install carpet tiles in alternating colors, monochromatic or complementary.

Example: A Central Florida hotel turned to this solution, when the game room carpeting needed replacing, after a surprise water pipe burst and flood. They purchased boxes of left-over carpet tiles from three different floor covering stores.

 

2. Create “game trails” by laying solid tiles in one direction of the room, and striped tiles in another.

Note: This trail was laid out in one of the game rooms in a children’s hospital.

 

3. Install both solid and geometric tiles, in alternate or random pattern.

 

4. Create a “space walk” effect.

Example: Install carpet tiles with Medium-to-Dark Blue and silver iridescent fibers, woven into a cosmic/space pattern. Note: This “walk” was surrounded by a mass of solid dark blue tiles.

 

5. Run a “walk” or “trail” up one long wall, turn left or right, wind it a few feet, then “move” the “walk” or “trail” back down to the floor. And, tie it into optical “ground.”

Note: This fun volunteer project, that I designed, was pulled off by using remnant carpeting, that we cut into square, oblong, and angular tiles. A major design/measure/cut/layout accomplishment!

 

Floor covering is more expensive than the average paint job. Combined with the wall finish, carpeting or tile adds immense value and atmosphere to the entire area. Its acoustics tend to be superb!

 

YES! A game room needs to include modern games, which are familiar to the guests and visitors.

 

A well thought out design and color scheme adds to the enjoyment of the area. It’s a smart investment.

Guests and visitors will thank you for it.

Guests, visitors, staff, and management will be motivated to “recommend” or “like” your hotel, spa, resort, or inn to others!

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Painting It: KidSuites and Children’s Rooms

Children want to have fun. And they need to be in an environment which enables them to do so. This is true, whether it is at home or on family vacation in a hotel or at a resort.

 

So, in what ways can a kid’s or children’s room be designed and painted that will create a great fun, and safe, atmosphere? While also keeping a child from becoming bored?

 

Here are some essential ingredients to liven up a kid’s or children’s room:

 

* Use multiple bright paint colors on the walls, ones shown to have a calming effect on children.

Examples: Sky Blue, Kelly Green, Hot Pink, Sun Yellow.

 

* Hang pictures of cartoon characters, action heroes and sports figures on the walls adjacent to the child’s bed.

Examples: Curious George, Pokémon, Hernandez.

 

* Create an area in the room, where children can draw and express themselves, and you can still protect the surfaces from damage.

Example: Dry erase board.

 

I have found that children tend to draw on anything within their reach.

 

* Install simple games, which are fixed to a surface, and have few small pieces that can get lost.

 

* Create an interactive character window, where children can play act and be photographed as some famous person, or cartoon character.

Examples: Mickey Mouse, cowboy, astronaut.

 

Designing the space is not enough!

 

What types of paint or finishes are formulated to hold up the best under the energy of children? I recommend the following:

 

* Ease of washing and abrasion resistant: Gloss enamel or gloss acrylic latex. Either is the best choice when considering ease of workability.

 

* Superior durability: Gloss epoxy. Notes: This product is more difficult to work with; and the odor can be overwhelming.

 

* Wood as the finished material/surface: Satin varnish, or polyurethane clear finish is the most suitable choice.

 

* Hand-painted murals as part of decor: Use sign painter enamel finishes; then a protective clear coat to ensure a lasting quality.

 

Making a children’s room a fun place is hardly new.

 

To make it happen, the approach involves one or more creative adults, and/or talented teens.

 

There is one prerequisite, really, to get started: Ask the children! Usually, they have definite opinions about what makes for a fun environment. Including in their bedrooms. And, they know how to bring that fun environment idea to life!

 

Use lots of color! The more the better. Add some unbridled artistic talent, too.

 

Painting for kids can be great fun.

Supercalifragilisticexpialidosiously fun!
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Two KidSuite-Children’s Room True Tales:

 
1. Two children had gotten very creative in their KidSuite. On two walls, they had drawn and painted in favorite cartoon animals: Curious George, Dinosaur Rex, Rolo the Dog, etc. Over half of the “filling-in” had been done with permanent markers. (Artistically, the 1st grader and preschooler did a great job!)

 

I used a soft scrub sponge to gently clean the surface with mild sudsy soap and warm water. After the family checked out two days later, I went back and used a “kids-safe” and odor-free latex paint to repaint the entire KidSuite.

 

Less than a month later, the walls in the same KidSuite had to be scrubbed again, and repainted. Three children, one only age three, had gotten super creative. With a large set of permanent markers, they had “painted” a “mural” along the walls, across bed frames, over the TV-dresser console, etc.

 

The children were very funny, and lovable. But way too creative and energetic to be holed up, on a rainy day, with nothing to do.

 

 

2. A Cocoa Beach hotel engineer told me about this problem, while his department was still trying to resolve it…

 

Here’s what the housekeepers, and painter, found when they entered a vacated family suite.  Crayolas, permanent markers, paints, colored pencils, colored chalk, and make-up had been used to draw and paint on nearly every surface in the children’s sleeping area, and one-half bath. Also, on two walls in the main sitting area.

 

The painter and an engineering tech worked on the area an entire day with minimal luck. The engineer asked me for suggestions to deter “future creative repeats at this level…” I suggested either of the following:

 

  1. washable, wood-look wall paneling, or
  2. washable, wrap-around kids paint-it mural, or activity paper.

 

Children hotel guests do not set out to damage room/suite walls, furniture, etc. They set out to have lots of fun. To entertain themselves. To get unbored.

 

Children’s hotel rooms and KidSuites need to make room for their energy, creativity, and curiosity.

 

And, the people who operate, clean, paint, and maintain these “special-guest” rooms and suites might want to explore – and install – more user-friendly surfaces!

 

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Children are people, too! So were we adults when we were their ages.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

 

 

Painting It: Skylights

As a natural source of light, a skylight is often overlooked as an area to be maintained and painted. Parts of it are exposed to the elements. Thus, keeping it weather tight is a priority in order to prevent damage to interior surfaces.

 

The skylight is also an element of design and a diverse use for color. “How is that,” you ask?

 

I once worked in a single level office building, where skylights were used to provide most of the interior light. My role was to paint these areas using a combination of hues to give the skylights an optical colored shading effect. Also, from different angles, the colors appeared to change. This occurred due to the changing intensity of the light.

 

Encorporating this effect into your own home is a possibility as well. Once again it will be your creativity that will be your guide.

 

Before you begin to paint, make certain that the following guidelines are observed:

 

  1. Make sure the skylight is sealed properly. Caulk if necessary.
  2. Clean the surface, removing any mold.
  3. Repair any cracks or loose paint.
  4. Use stain blocking primer to seal in the areas.
  5. Sand the entire surface for finish painting.
  6. Select either latex or oil based paint as your finish.
  7. Exposure to higher temperatures may require a more durable finish.

 

To paint a skylight, here are several options:

 

  1. Apply a color and sheen, which “matches” the surrounding ceiling area.
  2. Apply a color and sheen, which “differs from the surrounding ceiling area.
  3. Apply a bright color and glossy sheen, which “attracts” one’s attention.
  4. If the skylight is sizeable, apply multiple colors and sheens to create a “decorative” design.

 

Painting a skylight can be basic. You can match the white of your ceiling. Or, it can be a creative project. When it is completed, it complements any living space or an office.

 

Remember, a skylight can show off more than just the light. It can show off the colors in the area.

 

It can accentuate the appearance and function of the area. It can enhance the amenities of the hotel, hospital, or business.

 

And, it can lift the spirit of everyone that passes underneath its “spell. Something that natural light – sunlight – tends to do for persons of all ages. Our pets, too!

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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Painting with “SYMPHONY SAM”

STRADIVARIUS
My mother told me recently about “Symphony Sam.” That’s the name she gave the homeless man that played virtuoso-quality music with his violin, in Chicago’s Pedway. And, he handed out free copies of the official Vietnam Veterans of America newspaper.

 

She met him one morning, in the Pedway between Randolph Street and Michigan Avenue, and S. LaSalle Street. She took the underground walkway, when Chicago’s temperature dropped to the 30s (wind chill factor 20 degrees or lower), and freezing winds bit into one’s cheeks.

 

“Symphony Sam” was a Vietnam Veteran. He suffered from PTSD, the debilitating effects of Agent Orange, relentless pain from the shrapnel still in his back and legs, and major depression. He always wore “a frayed, dark blue suit” when he played in the Pedway. And, a “subtle smile of absolute acceptance.”

 

Prior to serving three tours of duty with the U. S. Marines, “Symphony Sam” taught music at Julliard. Also he played Second Violin, part-time, with the New York Philharmonic, and violin in the orchestra of an on-Broadway theatre.

 

WHAT DOES “Symphony Sam” HAVE TO DO WITH PAINTING?

 

After “Symphony Sam” was released from the military hospital in Japan, he returned to the United States. The only job he could get was painting sublet apartments for a New York City real estate company. He lived with a fellow Vietnam Veteran and his wife, in a small, three bedroom flat.

 

One Christmas, he ended up on a Greyhound Bus, as it pulled into the main terminal, in downtown Chicago. He told my mother that he never remembered buying a ticket, and getting on that bus.

 

He said that he checked into a cheap, but clean hotel on Randolph Street. He carried a few clothes in a small suitcase, and his Stradivarius violin. No painting tools.

 

The hotel’s manager helped “Symphony Sam” get little painting jobs at other small hotels, located in the Loop.

 

One night, he suffered a severe PTSD episode. He said that he’d been fortunate. All of his previous attacks, in New York and Chicago, had been mild ones. He ended up in Michael Reese Hospital on the South Side.

 

Since then, he’d been unable to work regularly. When he had enough money to get by, he stayed at that cheap hotel, managed by the friendly Sicilian. Usually, though, he “lived underneath the city…with a few friends…also Vietnam Vets.”

 

My mother saw “Symphony Sam” for the last time in 1989. The week before Christmas. “He wore a newer, used suit, and a pair of polished black boots,” she told me.

 

He told her that he had been living back at the hotel. He worked part-time doing repairs and painting for “a list of steady customers.” He called them “small hotel people.”

 

“Symphony Sam” seemed content,” Mom told me. But, her eyes told me a different story. A major concern of hers, over twenty-five years later.

 

Did “Symphony Sam” make it? For how long? In 1989, when she saw him last, he was over 55. PTSD and Agent Orange’s lung effects had become less manageable. Several common medical conditions had set in. “His newer suit hung on his frame, always very bony,” my mother recalled. “His eyes an eerie tornado green. . .”

 

“Florida has ‘Symphony Sams,’ too,” said my mother recently. On “FLASHPOINT,” two Central Florida homeless coalition officials were describing the modern housing facility to be built for the homeless in the area. A plea was made for major capital support from corporations.

 

What about the “foreclosure-bound” hotel that a church congregation and volunteers converted into studio efficiencies for the local homeless? (“Painting It: A Multi-Family ‘Home for the Homeless,” posted December 11-12, 2014.)

 

What about the abandoned mansion, turned into a transitional residence for the homeless? (Watch for: “Painting It: Existing Home for the Homeless,” to be posted December 23-24.)

 

What about “Symphony Sam?”

 

“I would offer these people a much quicker solution.” I told relatives during Thanksgiving.

 

“Constructing a new structure – a large transitional housing facility, for millions of dollars – could take a couple of years,” I explained. “The groups involved in the Central Florida project – facility – haven’t even selected the land yet.”

 

Here’s one proposal to help people like “Symphony Sam” have a safe, clean home – and a chance at a better life.

 

  1. Rescue a few smaller hotels and motels along U. S. Highway 192. The ones plagued by low occupancy rates, disrepair and damage, and the threat of foreclosure.
  2. Repair them. Reconfigure their rooms and public areas. Set up a central dining area for the homeless residents.
  3. Recruit homeless persons, who once worked as skilled construction workers. Put them to work. They can help in making certain repairs and reconfiguring the rooms and common (public) areas. Give them a chance to regain some of their dignity. Their basic skills, like riding a bike or typing, will come back to them.
  4. Offer these workers future housing there, when the property opens for occupancy.
  5. Give the homeless residents a good reason to take care of their respective room, and the overall property.
  6. Keep the housing as simple and practical as possible. Recycle whatever furniture, desks, fixtures, appliances, window treatments, kitchen ware, dishes, etc. that are in good condition. Repaint, re-stain and refinish all surfaces.

 

By the way, expensive wallcoverings, flooring, furniture, and state-of-the-art systems are unnecessary. Research and reports about homeless shelter accommodations show that “pricier” amenities tend to make persons just off the streets nervous, self-conscious, apprehensive, distrustful, and even ill.

 

Every community has a “Symphony Sam.” A person who still possesses the skills and abilities, the passion, and the interest to give back! To get off the street! To once again become a more productive part of the universe.

 

Every community has do-able options to meet the dire housing needs of the homeless. Every community has at least one existing multi-unit property, that can be converted in a time-cost-manpower efficient manner.

 

Our local hotel GMs and their staffs can do only so much. They can help only so much. Their resources are very limited. Their ability to use their properties – which they do not own – is very, very limited.

 

What needs to happen to provide safe and clean housing for the “Symphony Sams” in our respective communities? To get this job done sooner than two to three years after they become statistics?

 

Local entities such as the Central Florida Coalition on Homeless and Central Florida Foundation (http://www.cffound.org) are proactive, and motivated.

 

Special projects such as the “Reconstruction of Housing for the Homeless in America Project” focus on providing safe housing promptly.

 

Professional and trade projects like the AIA’s new redesign/rebuild internship project tap young talent. Among other things, they offer fresh, new approaches to “reconfiguring and retrofitting” solid existing structures into great multi-occupancy housing.

 

What is your community doing to get your homeless adults and children, into safe and clean housing?

 

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“Best wishes for a healthy, safe and peaceful holiday season – and Year 2015.”

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

 

Painting In: Company Policy, Common Sense and Common Courtesy: Part 1

Scenario:
A person – let’s say a painter – leaves his or her employment with a company.

 

Whatever the circumstance, it is standard company policy for any former employee to separate physically from the business, organization, people there, and property.

 

It is standard company policy that a former employee not return onto the property except:

 

  1. for a business reason that requires their physical return;
  2. for an occasional, brief visit – one to two times a year maximum;
  3. by invitation – eg. for a departmental party or cook-out;
  4. to “apply in person” for a job opening;
  5. for a job interview;
  6. to return – a rehire – to work there.

 

 

By the way, any and all returns should be cleared, in advance, with the hotel or facility general manager, or front office. That’s called “respect” or “common courtesy.”

 

It is common sense for a former employee to stay away from the business, organization and people. That gives everyone involved the time and space needed to:

 

  1. yes, mourn the departed employee’s loss;
  2. accept the person’s absence from the team, and the group; and
  3. adjust to the changes necessary because of the person’s departure from the organization.

 

It is common courtesy for a former employee to remain off the property, and away from the organization, except for any of the six reasons given above. This gives the replacement the best opportunity possible to assimilate into his or her new position.

 

He or she needs, and deserves, the opportunity to succeed. The replacement – new employee – has a job to do there.

 

  1. He or she needs to learn the ropes within the department, also interdepartmentally and organizationally.
  2. He or she needs to adjust and tweak his or her skills, abilities and resources to meet the unique needs of the new property – and employer.
  3. He or she needs to be welcomed properly by his new teammates and bosses.
  4. He or she needs to find his or her place on the team, and how to fit in!
  5. He or she needs to establish a reliable communication and negotiation system with his or her supervisor, other department directors, and managers.
  6. He or she needs to build teammate relationships and organizational friendships – at all levels – that are mutually beneficial, supportive and gratifying.
  7. He or she needs to find unique ways to contribute to the organization and the business.
  8. He or she needs to participate in and belong to the company family.

 

 

When a former employee stays off the property, and stays separated from the company, he or she benefits, too. He or she has the best opportunity to succeed autonomously.

 

  1. He or she can mourn the job loss, with the attention and respect it deserves.
  2. He or she can look back and gain a clear perspective of his or her total employment experience – and work life – there.
  3. He or she can reflect, objectively and subjectively, on past achievements, contributions and also unmet goals.
  4. He or she can rest in the present, and both assess and appreciate his current skills and abilities, accrued knowledge, creative talents, aspirations, and place in the world of employability.
  5. He or she can plan for the future. The person can create a plan that (a) respects that person’s work ethic and set of values; (b) offers opportunities for changes, growth and doing well; and (c) fulfills the greater need to feel like the person fits in and belongs, contributes, and can do more good.

 

When my grandfather retired from the ministry, he left a parish where he and my grandmother were totally respected, and deeply loved. In leaving, he announced to the consistory and congregation that he and Grandmother would be “staying away” from the church parish for one full year. Why?

 

“To give the new man a chance,” he explained to everyone concerned. (And, others that asked!)

 

Grandfather knew that it would be a major challenge for the successor to fill his pastoral shoes. He knew that it would be a bigger challenge for “the new man” to establish his own place – his own identity – in the church and in the community. To fit in and to belong!

 

Grandfather kept his pledge, and promise. Yes, he and Grandmother maintained their closest personal friendships with a few individuals and couples in the church. (They had retired there, their home community for over 25 years.)

 

Still, they refrained from having any communications and activities that may have, even indirectly, made “life uncomfortable and difficult for the new man.”

 

As a result, the new man sought Grandfather’s counsel on a regular basis. And, the two clergy became trusted friends, strong supporters of each other, and professional confidantes.

 

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POINTS TO PONDER:

1. Have you ever been a “former employee?” Did you follow standard company policy after your departure?

2. Did you exercise common sense about your former employer, teammates/coworkers, and organization – and their circumstance?

3. Did you practice common courtesy toward your former teammates/coworkers, former managers, and former employer, as well as your replacement?

4. Have you ever been working where and when a former employee showed up repeatedly on the property?  For years? How did you handle the situation each time?

5. How well was the company policy, including security rules, followed by all current employees and managers, including you? By the former employee? By the business owners?

 

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“In the long haul, it pays to follow company policy, exercise common sense, and practice common courtesy – and help others do the same.”

Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Decorative Finishing: Adding Life to Your Space: “Malachite.” *

In the first course, we explored a finish application known as “Rag Rolling.”

SECOND INSTALLMENT: Decorative “Malachite.”

“Malachite” is a unique finish. It produces a simulation of an emerald green translucent mineral composed of circular radiating veins. It resembles the rippling effect produced when you drop a pebble into water. You get the picture.

You can, of course, choose colors other than green. Red looks fantastic, as well. However, an authentic “Malachite” is done in a traditional green.

What is your project? An ideal choice is the top of a lamp table. It’s small and reasonably easy to complete in a short time. All right, let’s get started.

1. Our piece to be finished: A small table top. Main color: Emerald green.
2. Preparation is important.

A. Thoroughly sand the surface to a dulled smoothness.

B. Prime the table top with a latex or oil based primer. Using a spray can primer is very suitable.

C. Once the primer has dried sufficiently, sand the surface smooth, with #320 wet or dry sandpaper.

 

3. Next apply a basecoat in a pastel or light green tone. The basecoat can either be water or oil based. When dry, lightly sand with #320 or #400 sandpaper.

 

4. The layout of the pattern is as follows:

A. Use a rubber, metal or cardboard comb. TIP: Cardboard is preferred because you can cut your own pattern.

B. Along the straight edge of the object, make small grooves 2-3mm apart. Vary the distance between the grooves.

5. Next, apply the dark glaze evenly to the surface.

 

6. You can now create the “Malachite” pattern.

A. With grooved tool in hand, glide the edge of the tool through the glaze. This will reveal a fan-like pattern – “relief” – where the basecoat reflects through from the groves in your tool.

B. Turn the tool from left to right, or in reverse, to expose the simulated mineral pattern.

C. As the procedure is applied, overlap each fan shape at the corners.

D. In a roofing shingle formation overlap each row, one after another, where the points meet

The effect is “successfully completed” when the “Malachite” shapes vary in grain pattern.

TIP: If errors are made, you can remove the pattern simply by washing off the glaze or rewetting it with another application.

 

8. Once the design is dry, a top finishing coat can be applied for protection. A water based varnish or a standard polyurethane are your best choices.

 

The finished “Malachite” will be an instant focal point in any room. It will be a consistent reminder of your creative imagination.

You never know! It may serve to inspire your relatives and friends to develop an artistic expression of their own.

 

* WATCH FOR: Images of “Marbelite” finish.

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Painting Around Sharp Budget Cuts, Part 1

Sharp budget cuts mandate many changes in an organization – such as a hotel, hospital or university – that employs a full-time staff painter. They tend to include staff terminations in some departments – including engineering/facilities services/physical plant.

The loss of even one person, in an already manpower-strapped operation, can affect everyone there. Each person in a way unique to his or her job description, role as a member of the department team, and link as a member of the organizational team.

The work load increases, usually for everyone who still has a job.

Each person must continue to complete his or her own projects and work orders – in a timely, satisfactory manner. In addition, each has to assume some responsibility for the completion of tasks and work orders handled previously by the team member or members no longer there.

A painter, even a lead painter, may take on engineering/maintenance tech jobs and work orders.

Fill-in tasks, such as pest control spraying and mold/mildew remediation, may become regular parts of his or her routine job.

He or she may do basic guest room repairs and replacements. He or she may repair and replace air conditioner units, plumbing, lighting, tile and carpeting, roofing, WI-FI connections, and door key card systems.

The painter may help with mechanical and operating system repairs, and pool and spa repairs. He or she may be asked to handle exterior lighting and property security and safety system repairs. He or she may need to assist with groundskeeping and lawn maintenance.

 Any additional load leaves less time to get regular painting done.

How did you handle your engineering department’s last sharp budget cut? How many teammates, if any, did you lose? How many non-paint job responsibilities did you take on? For how long? How did it go?

Which, and how many, of your regular job tasks and projects got pushed on the back burners? How long ago was the last cutback? Do you continue to operate under capacity?

If so, how do you schedule in your regular projects and tasks? How do you make room for the added responsibilities? How do you ensure yourself the time and resources needed to do both jobs right?

Perhaps, one or more of the following related practices may help you be good-to-go.

 

1. Take your calendar – paper, online, app, etc. List your current paint shop-related projects and tasks.

 TIP: Take a little time with this. Make sure you get the main ones. Get down the other ones that you do take care of – and no one, including you, thinks much about.

 

2. With each project and task, determine where you’re really at.

ASK YOURSELF: What else needs to be done to complete it? Approximately, how much more time do you need to get each finished?

 

3. Prioritize each according to need. Set approximate time line and completion date.

 

4. On your calendar, slot out time needed each week – or every other week, at the latest – to work on each project.

TIP: You and your supervisor need to agree which ones must be completed as soon as possible. CAUTION: This can change at any time, and often. With little or no warning!

 

5. Allow yourself and your department a little flexibility.

 

6. Determine your regular paint shop tasks. The ones high on your job description and capability lists. Yes, those lists may vary a little or a lot.

 

7. Determine approximately how long you need, each week – or every other week, at the latest – to do each task.

 

8. Consider the best days of the week, and times, to work on each one.

Example: “Good-to-go: Wednesdays, 9-2, while most guests are visiting area theme parks; sightseeing; attending major sports event, conference, etc… and I can put other things on hold.”

 

9. Estimate how long you will need to do each.

 

10. Prioritize. Consult with your supervisor as needed.

 

11. Schedule onto your calendar – and all department calendars, too!

 

Sound like common-sense stuff, that every experienced painter will not need help with? Maybe.

When team size dwindles, available skill-sets and expertise can dwindle, too. So will available work time.

Confusion, stress and overload can set in suddenly. It can throw you off. Especially, if it hits you on an off day, at an off time.

“Nip it in the bud,” as character Barney Fife, “The Andy Griffith Show,” said repeatedly.

Get good-to-go. Block-in your painting and decorating related projects and tasks.

It is up to you to make certain that every paint-shop related project, task and work order is taken care of. That’s a given!

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Protect your own “staff painter” work day! Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob” blog.

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