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Posts tagged ‘facility’

Every Hotel’s/Facility’s Team Member Can Learn Something from Its Painter: Part 2

Painting and decorating is a very multi-faceted job. It requires an extensive knowledge of and experience with both trade and construction industry methods, products, materials, supplies, tools, and equipment. Also, it requires the ability to deal with a variety of factors: weather and climate, property (age, condition, use, size), budget, schedule, etc.

Any hotel or facility team member – teammate of the property’s painter – is in an enviable position. He or she has access to this skilled craftsperson. All kinds (of helpful information is in his or her head. And, at his or her fingertips.

Tap into this valuable resource. Your friendly team painter – and teammate – could be your best painting and decorating advisor ever!

Continuing from Part 1, here are some other things that you can learn from the painter with your hotel or facility.

 

12. How to inspect a wallcovering shipment before using it.

 

A. Carefully! Completely! Every roll! From beginning-to-end of roll!

B. Multiple rolls: Make sure the numbers are from the same run or batch. If not pattern or color may be different.

C. Check if pattern aligns properly from roll to roll.

D. Reversed vinyls: Check for color matching, especially for darker colors.

 

13. How to cut wallcovering sheets to match the room’s layout.

 

A. Full sheets: Cut all of the full sheets first.

B. Cut pieces above and below windows or doors, measured to match.

C. In-sequence sheets: Mark them, if necessary.

D. Tops of sheets: Label, if needed.

E. Corners of sheets: Mark for commercial vinyls, or for solid color non-patterned papers.

 

14. How to prep a surface or area for applying wallcovering.

 

A. Sand surface smooth.

B. Patch surface where necessary, using a chemical-cured, or powdered joint compound.

C. Apply sizing or oil-based primer to the walls.

D. Sand primed surfaces when fully dry.

E. Mark vertical lines at corners of walls so sheets are plumb.

 

15. How to set up a work area for applying wallcovering.

 

A. Protect floor with dropcloths, particularly where cutting and paste table(s) will set.

B. Set up pasting and cutting area: tables, blades/knives, level, sponges.

C. Place necessary materials and supplies in area: paste materials, rolls/boxes of wallcovering (inspected previously), tools (measuring tape and ruler, cutting/trimming knives, pasting brushes, smoothing knife, seamer, etc.)

D. Put bucket of warm, clean water at paste table, for cleaning it as needed.

E. TIP: Keep a second bucket of warm water nearby, for cleaning tools – as necessary.

F. TIP: Have a small bucket of very clean, cotton rags nearby, too.

G. Place sizeable, lined garbage container nearby for scrap wallcovering.

 

16. How a painter/paperhanger actually applies wallcovering.

 

A. Apply adhesive to wallcovering sheets, if product is not self-adhesive.

B. Unfold top section of sheet, aligning in proper place; then smooth down using a brush, or plastic edge smoothing tool.

C. Hold onto sheet with one hand, and smooth rest of sheet into place.

D. Seam sheets either by butting or overlapping seams. “Seamless seams.”

E. Fit and trim wallcovering around moldings and fixtures on wall or ceiling.

 

17. How to clean up after finishing wallcovering job.

 

A. Remove paint, filler, polyurethane from rim of can, also spray can nozzles

B. Reseal/re-closing and storing paint cans, caulking tubes, filler/putty tubs.

C. Soak tools used to apply wallpaper paste

(1) Wheat/cellulose/clay water-based paste: Soak brushes in bucket/can of clean, warm water.

D. Clean tools:

(1) Soak in warm, soapy water; then rinse.

(2) Residual paste can be removed with warm water and carbonated water for hard-to-clean vinyls.

E. Read blogs: “Paint Shop 1: Organizing…” ”Paint Shop 2: “Policies and Guidelines.”

 

18. How to protect and store your tools.

 

A. Brushes: Stand upright, bristles down. Read blog: “Paint Shop 1: Organizing.”

*** TIP: In a rush? Wrap brush or roller in newspaper, or wax paper. Secure with sturdy rubber band till you can clean brush thoroughly.

B. Roller covers/naps: Air, till nap dry. Store upright in tool box, or clean 1-gal. paint can.

C. Artist brushes: Air, till bristles dry. Store, bristles up or flat in brush case. Never down, unless you’ve wrapped brush.

D. Spray equipment: Flush properly with compatible solvent (water, mineral spirits). Clean spray tips. Remove any dried paint.

E. Central storage container: Store all hand tools together creates immediate availability. Also it reduces time looking for tools in different locations.

 

SPECIAL THINGS TO LOOK FOR…

 

1. Darker wallcoverings: Wash with baking or carbonated soda-based water wash. Remove paste thoroughly.

2. Pasting: Apply adhesive evenly and very smoothly to back of wallcovering.

3. Pasting option: Apply adhesive to the wall.

4. Watch carefully: Do not UNDERCUT wallcovering when trimming around something.

5. Hanging multiple sheets vinyl on new drywall: Cut seams before you go too far.

—- CAUTION: Drywall paper may pull loose if you wait too long.

 

A FEW QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR PAINTER WHEN IT’S CONVENIENT

 

1. Which paint is better: flat wall paint, semi-gloss, or gloss?

2. How can I get something painted when I have a low budget?

3. Would you consider bartering? Eg. Painting our house for design help with website?

4. I have a friend that needs some painting done. Can I give him your cell phone number?

 

QUESTIONS NOT TO ASK YOUR PAINTER IF YOU WANT TO KEEP AS A FRIEND

 

1. Can you recommend a painter? I need some work done in my home.

2. Can you paint my house for free? TIP: Ask about “bartering.” See last section.

3. Is it all right if I don’t recommend you, or act as a reference?

4. Can you fix my week-end wallpapering mess – as a favor?

5. If you have a stain-finished door, what can I do to prepare it for finish painting?

 

A Painter’s Point to Ponder:

 

Being asked by co-workers, at whatever levels, to share tips from one’s trade is an honor. Especially, when done with genuine respect and interest.

It gives added meaning to the “team”-anything connection. And, it deepens the mutual, and individual, sense of worth and belonging.

 

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Please find a way to help someone else enjoy this day! Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Every Hotel’s/Facility’s Team Member Can Teach Something to Its Painter: Part 1

1. How to set and disperse a budget fairly and effectively. How to build a strong, loyal and happy team.

GO-TO” Team mentors: General Manager; Manager.

2. How to “niche” market your best services and creatively market your weak spots. How to upgrade the property’s paint palette to attract guests that match your mission. How individual staff members can promote and market their hospitality business.

 “GO-TO” Team mentors: Director/Sales and Marketing; Sales Rep.

3. How to find the best on-line travel deals  –  to visit anywhere, any time. How to identify best-for-your-budget websites on which to advertise.

“GO-TO” Team mentors: Director/On-line Sales; On-line sales rep.

4. How to negotiate the best deal for a big group – eg. wedding reception, alumni club. How to choose between buffet, family style, or ala carte menu. How to choose between pre-purchased, open-bar, or cash-bar beverage set-up.

“GO-TO” Team mentors: Director/Food and Beverage; F & B planner.

5. How to plan a memorable, affordable event on very short notice. How to plan an unforgettable group event.

“GO-TO” Team mentors: Director/Conferences and Events; Event planner.

6. How to interface land, on-line and mobile communication devices. How to use latest software programs, secure files, and select secure passwords. How to prevent breaches to accounting files.

 “GO-TO” Team mentors: Director/I.T.; Internet manager.

7. How to identify lower quality repair supplies to prevent waste. What the engineering staff needs on a regular basis, when it comes to supplies.

“GO-TO” Team mentors: Chief of Engineering; Engineering tech.

8. How to negotiate the best deal on a small order. What types of items require more inventory to prevent running out.

“GO-TO” Team mentors: Director/Purchasing; Purchasing agent.

9. How to select, prepare and serve top-quality budget meat like prime cuts. How to prepare popular dishes; or prepare new dishes using popular food products.

“GO-TO” Team mentors: Head Chef; Specialty chef/cook.

10. How to remove toughest stains and destroy stubborn odors from very vulnerable surfaces. What products to control room odors last the longest.

“GO-TO” Team mentors: Director of Housekeeper; any Supervisor/Housekeeping.

11. How to repair and clean an A/C motor. How to tell when A/C Freon charge is insufficient.

“GO-TO” Team mentor: Manager/HVAC Systems.

12. How to keep accurate financial records, and file taxes on-line. How a business settles delinquent, frozen supplier accounts.

“GO-TO” Team mentors: Manager/Accounting; Supplier account manager.

13. How to make anyone feel welcome. How to interpret guest complaints, reactions, body language, eye movements, voice, etc.

“GO-TO” Team mentors: Manager/Front Desk; Front Reception.

14. How to grid, plant and maintain eye-catching front entrance appearance. How to prioritize areas for landscaping.

 “GO-TO” Team mentors: Director of Groundskeeping; Landscaper/groundskeeper.

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What ‘GO-TO” departmental tip do you want more facility painters to use regularly?

Which ‘GO-TO” departmental tip do you want other team mentors to use?

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READ PART 2: “More Hotel/Facility Team Members and GO-TO’ Team mentors.”

What to Carry on Your Painter’s Golf Cart

 golfcarts   In July, a painter with a four-star hotel and resort e-mailed me about his recently inherited golf cart. He’d just relocated from the East coast.

“Two questions: What are the must-haves, good-to-haves, etc. to carry on my cart? What should I carry to be ready for anything? With the larger property and greater flexibility and autonomy in this job comes more time management challenges.”

Golf carts are the standard mode of transportation and conveyance for hotel and other facilities’ painters, as well as engineering techs. They’re compact, and a real back saver and life saver.

They’re a necessity for (1) getting around the property fast, (2) responding promptly and efficiently to calls, (3) hauling materials, supplies and tools, (4) equipping oneself for completing scheduled and emergency tasks and projects, and, (5) performing those “other duties as needed.”

What things do you need to keep on your golf cart?                                     

1. The 24/7 basics

A. Products and materials: Joint compound mix, caulking, light-weight spackling, paint, texture patch, interior/exterior paint for touch-up work.

B. Supplies: No. 120 and No. 220 sandpaper, masking tape (3/8-inch, 1-inch, 1 ½-inch), masking paper, steel wool, “WET PAINT” signs, small bag of clean rags; dropcloths (clean), buckets.

C. Tools: Drywall pan, 6-inch knife, 10-inch knife, multi-sized screwdrivers, portable drill, drywall hand saw, caulking gun, assorted paint brushes and roller covers, utility knife, roller frame and screen, roller extension poles, wire brush, paint strainer.

D. Protective gear: Safety glasses, disposable bodysuits, gloves, rubber gloves, respirator, dust masks.

E. Disposal/garbage things: Plastic bags, rolls of paper towels.

2. Add: Painting-related work order essentials

A. Spray cans of fast drying primer (white, gray), latex caulking, joint compound

B. Small notebook

3. Add: Painting project essentials

A. Roll of plastic, garbage container, circulating fan, “CAUTION” Tape.

4. Add: Special painting and decorating project essentials

A. Sponges, cheese cloth, tack cloths, plastic wrap, masking tape

B. Glazing liquid, linseed oil, paint thinner, various faux finishing brushes

5. Add: Handy-to-have along items

A. Masking machine, heat gun, wallpaper steamer

B. Broom and dustpan, vacuum cleaner (portable, battery-operated)

6. Add: Engineering and maintenance tech basic supplies

A. Replacement parts for bathtub, sinks, electrical, light bulbs

B. Paint to touch up walls where necessary, caulking for tubs, sinks and counter-tops

C. Hammer, wrench, pliers, 2-4 clamps, sealant glue

D. Level, tape measure, picture hanging clips/fasteners

 7. Add: Containers, holders, etc. to keep things organized

A. Large portable tool container

B. Plastic tray (s) for small parts

Okay! What things should NOT be carried around on your work golf cart?

1.  Air compressor, pressure washer

2.  Anything that protrudes out from cart’s side or back, creating safety issue

3.  CAUTION: Hazardous materials should be removed from your cart as quickly as possible. Never leave them on the cart, when it is left unattended, or overnight.

TIPS FOR KEEPING YOUR GOLF CART CLEAN, AND LOOKING FINE!

1. Once a week

. Wash your golf cart and wipe dry with a clean, soft rag.

. Wipe down all other areas to keep them looking clean.

. Clean the windshield – as often as needed. Include windows, if cart is enclosed.

. Vacuum the floor, back areas, etc.

. Straighten out your supply and tool areas, while you’re at it.

. As a final touch, give the steering wheel and column, dashboard, etc. a good cleaning with a couple of disinfecting wipes.

2. Once a month, or more often

. Clean the seat upholstery. Spray on all-purpose auto upholstery product, or mixture of 1 part mild vinegar to 2-3 parts water. Wipe dry.

. Wipe down all surfaces.

3. Every six months

. Apply a coat of car/truck wax on metal surfaces. Buff out with soft rag/cloth.

. Apply a similar wax on plastic areas, such as the canopy.

A FEW GOLF CART SAFETY SUGGESTIONS…

1. Make sure the batteries are fully charged every day.

2. Check the tires for proper inflation at least once a week.

3. Always carry the ignition key with you. Never leave it in the cart.

4. Always park your loaded up cart as close as possible to your working area.

* CAUTION:  An unattended golf cart can be an “inviting enticement.”

CLOSING TIP:

What you carry on your cart depends a lot on your listed job description. Also, it depends on the other things that you may be responsible for handling. It depends on the size of the property. And, it depends on how much running you want to do – back and forth between your paint shop and the locations on your “to-do” list for the day or week.

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Enjoy your day!  Enjoy your life! And, thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

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