Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

Posts tagged ‘faux finishing’

PAINTING AND DECORATING: THE HOTEL PENTHOUSE

A Central Florida hotel gave me the choice of three redecorating projects:

 

  1. larger penthouse,
  2. front lobby, or
  3. outdoor children’s play-town.

 

I opted for the penthouse. The other two projects were put on hold by the property management company.

 

Why the penthouse project got my vote: The diversity of creative decorating opportunities.

 

  1. Interior work – A/C, controlled environment.
  2. Fine finishing surfaces: paneling, columns, furniture.
  3. Lots of wallcovering installation, including mural.
  4. Custom color matching: paint-to-patterned wallcoverings.
  5. Faux finishing.
  6. Minimal traffic
  7. Management’s style, commitment and candor.

 

I scheduled the project into twelve main phases:

 

  1. Needs assessment by room, area, square footage, surface conditions, and preparation requirements.
  2. Products, materials, supplies costing-to-budget allotment; selection and coordination; quantity estimating and computation; requisitioning to purchasing.
  3. Wood furniture and woodwork stripping or bleaching.
  4. Wallcovering removal.
  5. Ceilings, walls, doors repairing, patching, filling.
  6. Wood repairing, filling, sanding, sealing.
  7. Ceilings, walls priming.
  8. Woodwork, doors, furniture re-staining and light sanding.
  9. Painting.
  10. Woodwork, doors, furniture finishing.
  11. Wallpaper and mural hanging.
  12. Faux finishing.

 

I was responsible for all aspects of the project except:

 

  1. delivery delays of custom wallcoverings and murals,
  2. purchasing department delays, errors, etc.

 

The one twist: The hotel president’s wife, a retired ASID member, would be included in the selection of the wallcoverings, and murals. In reality, the lady showed up on site once a week during the entire project. She put herself “to work.” She helped whichever hotel maintenance technician may have been assisting me on that day.

 

The project moved right along.
Complete shutdown was needed only two days – carpenter, plumber, tile man. The flooring people installed new carpeting after I completed my work. Note: I waited to re-install the re-finished baseboards until after the flooring was installed.

 

A FEW TIPS FOR ANY SIMILAR PROJECT THAT YOU MAY BE CONSIDERING

 

Before you sign on, you might want to do the following:

 

  1. Find out where the hotel’s purchasing manager orders the bulk of paint products and wallpaper materials.
  2. Clear with management – get it in writing – for YOU to be the person that visits the paint store and communicates with product/material representatives.
  3. Set it up so that YOU are the person that puts together the actual requisition order schedule and lists, for the purchasing manager to follow.
  4. Get a list – in writing – of all other work that will be taking place in the area. See that it includes the approximate “schedule blocks” of work days for every other craftsperson. Examples: carpenters, electricians, plumbers, tile installers, drywall installers.

 

BEST CASE SCENARIO:

 

  1. Hotel management sets it up and authorizes YOU to actually do the ordering from suppliers.
  2. You work under ONE member of management.
  3. You have access to other members of organization – supervisors, managers, staff – as needed.
  4. Feedback from managers is limited, and direct. No filtering through a chain of people.
  5. Project inspections are limited, and conducted by person(s) with authority to assist and act.
  6. “Sightseeing” visits by managers and staff members are kept to minimum, even discouraged.

 

HOW THINGS WENT:

  1. The hotel’s staff was friendly, helpful and totally enthusiastic. Especially the staff painter, and the engineering department, as a whole.
  2. The project came off without any major glitch – eg. shipment delay of custom wallcoverings.
  3. The project came in under budget – a surprise, even to me.
  4. The project was completed one week early. (Another surprise.)
  5. The carpenters, electricians, plumbers, drywallers, and tile installers stuck to the master schedule – and theirs. Great teams!
  6. Final inspections came off with only minor changes.
  7. The hotel management company signed off promptly.
  8. The hotel’s principal owner flew in for a final walk-through – and “staff only open house.”

 

Would I pick that “penthouse project” again? Yes! Though it was the first one that I’d worked on solo. And, it was the largest: over 4,000 square feet, including the veranda.

 

TIP FOR TOP QUALITY INTERIOR FINISHERS:

 

Ask around. There’s bound to be a hotel, resort, or residential penthouse somewhere that needs your special, fine touch. If nothing else, offer to help the staff painter get it into shining shape again.

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Special thanks to everyone that has helped others do a great job at their chosen work.

And, thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Advertisements

Painting It: Classic Marbleizing

Marble Faux Finished Lamp Table

The Marble finish represents the finest decorative application that can be achieved. In the 18th century, the artist guilds throughout Europe studied and simulated the wide varieties of quarried stone for the purpose of interior design.

 

Today, faux marble has been recognized as the most creative style to master. It is one of the most fascinating decorative forms to learn and apply.

 

Here are some recommended fundamental skills and tools of the trade to use for marbleizing.

 

SKILLS:

  1. Ability to perceive depth in three dimensions.
  2. Sensitive flexible touch.
  3. Sense of applying realism to a simulated form.
  4. Ability to combine random transparent textures.
  5. Ability to apply a variety of finishes using a variety of application methods.

 

TOOLS:

  1. Badger Hair blending brush, 3 or 4 inch          7. Sea sponges, small and larg
  2. Bright brush, # 7 or # 8                                        8. Goose feather
  3. Chiqueteur brush (special/optional)                  9. Cheesecloth
  4. Filbert brush, #1 and #2                                       10. Newspaper
  5. Flat brush, #10 or #12                                           11. Tack rags (2+)
  6. Spalter brush, 3 or 4 inch

 

THE METHOD OF MARBLEIZING

 

Marbleizing simply means a “simulation of marble.” And, it is done by replicating the same elements of composition, which are found inside the actual Marble itself.

 

You see it with your eyes, visualize it and reproduce it on the surface you have selected.

 

THE GENERAL STEPS TO ACHIEVE YOUR MARBLEIZED FINISH:

 

  1. The surface needs to be smooth and blemish free. Sand and patch accordingly – #120, then #220.
  2. Apply a suitable primer, using a low nap roller cover. When dry, sand surface smooth.
  3. Apply a basecoat, which has the appropriate background color of the genuine Marble.
  4. Sand the surface smooth with #320, then #400 sandpaper.
  5. Apply the first glaze color with a sponge, creating a wide criss-cross pattern. Blend into the surrounding basecoat, leaving random darkened areas.
  6. Apply the second glaze color with a sponge, overlapping the first application. Blend randomly. Leave some areas more heavily textured and other areas less textured.
  7. Mix the glaze color for the veins. Use a Sable Liner brush to create veins in random vertical and  irregular horizontal configuration. Blend edges of veins randomly.
  8. Mix a dark color glaze. Use a small and stiff Flat brush – eg. #8 or #10 – to finely splatter the surface in random locations.
  9. Apply a clear coat varnish or polyurethane to the surface, using a Spalter brush or a low nap roller. When dry, sand the surface with #400 sandpaper.
  10. Tack rag, and reapply a finish coat.

 

Note: The steps and tools to be used vary, depending on the type of Marble that you are trying to simulate.

 

THINGS TO REMEMBER:

 

  1. Glazes can be applied using either latex or oil based products.
  2. Keep tools and brushes clean.
  3. Always maintain a flexible approach and view when applying a decorative finish.
  4. Sand surfaces between each coat, when an ultra smooth surface is desired.
  5. Mask and cover all areas not to be finished.

 

SKILLS TIP:  When in doubt about your skills, test them. Make up several sample boards.

 

DECORATING TIP: Think creatively, and perceptively.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

SPRING into action. MARBLEIZE something!   Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting Them: Restaurants, Clubs and Bars in Hotels and Resorts.

Places where people go to relax or have fun vary in theme, design, and atmosphere. They can be uplifting, heart pounding, eclectic, luxurious, earthy and natural, or any other unique effect.

 

Each atmosphere has a style all its own. And, hopefully, it is appropriate to the type of public the dining and social amenities want to attract.

 

The design and painting of a “restaurant “can include the following features, depending on the overall theme of the area:

 

1. Soft earth tones blended with matte black accents.

 

2. Wood veneer “paneling” and wainscoting with mitered moldings.

 

3. Ceilings painted in off white or pastel beiges.

 

4. Faux finishing applications such as gold leafing and marbleizing.

 

5. Textured wall finishes such as Venetian plaster.

 

When designing and painting a “club,” here are some suggestions:

 

1. In a “bright” club setting, bright and flashing lights mean brilliant flashy colors.

 

2. In a “bohemian” setting, subtle and complementary earth tone finishes set the mood.

 

3. In an “electrifying” setting, a combination of colors sets the pace – eg. reds with purples, and blues with silvers.

 

4. Use “high intensity graphics” with simulated chrome appearance, possibly neons and metallic transparent finishes.

 

The design and painting of a “bar” can incorporate the following options:
1. A bar, which is “relaxing” and conducive to quiet conversation, has a subdued atmosphere. Using darker earth tone colors with moderately dark stain paneled woods is optimal.

 

2. In a bar full of electricity and a fast beat, use bright and reflective colors.

 

3. For ceiling styles, consider a “traditionally finished metal pan ceiling.” Nostalgia can provide a very relaxing and comfortable environment.

 

4. In any case, the bar itself needs to be one “focal point.” Design it with wood paneling, stained in a moderately dark color and finished in a matte sheen of durable vanish or polyurethane. Any molding can be highlighted by finishing with a light oak stain, enhanced by a gloss clear finish.

 

Atmosphere is everything. Patrons will enjoy their meals or drinks much more where they feel at home, almost as much if they were there.

 

Design and paint, that are selected, blended and served right, always go well with food and drink!

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Enjoy a little bit of heaven at your favorite spot. Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

 

Tag Cloud