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Posts tagged ‘Furniture’

Painting It: Susika’s “First Real Bedroom”

 

Susika was a ten-and-a-half year old when we met. Her aunt and U. S. Marine uncle had brought her home with them, after the mass family funeral in the Middle East. On the plane, they promised her a “real bedroom.”

 

Uncle “J.J.” and several handy friends knocked out a wall to add six feet to the small 10-feet by 9-feet space.

 

Here’s how they outfitted what Susika called her “first real bedroom.”

 

  1. On 15-feet window wall: Built in a window seat, with bookshelves on each end, and two roomy, half-cupboards underneath.
  2. On each side of window seat unit: A roomy closet: one for clothes, the other for her “stuff.”
  3. On other three walls: Wall rails and one-half wainscoting.
  4. Floor covering: Wall-to-wall, commercial grade carpeting: Colors: Pastels in pink, rose, cranberry, mint green, forest green. Pattern: Splashes and Swirls.
  5. Bed Furniture: Wood twin bed, 6-drawer dresser, 2 night tables. From uncle’s elderly neighbors.
  6. Old wooden desk and chair. Shared by her mother and “J. J.” as children.
  7. Small arm chair. Once used by older cousin, now in college.
  8. Toy chest. Originally belonged to her uncle.
  9. Bean bag chair, vinyl. Color: Hot pink. New. A gift from that cousin in college.
  10. Four-shelf, three-drawer unit. For stuffed animals and dolls. Yard sale purchase.
  11. Bulletin-White board. For hanging above desk. Purchased at Wal-Mart.

MY JOB: Paint and finish coat everything paintable. And, there was a lot.

 

Susika chose her new room’s paint colors from Glidden’s® “Make It Magical with Disney” line.

(For information: www.disneypaint.com.)

Color scheme: Soft white, pastel pinks and greens, also tinted forest green.

Paints used: Interior semi-gloss and high-gloss latexes; also artist acrylics.

 

SURFACES and AREAS, COLORS

 

Ceiling: Glidden Color No. WDPR03. Color: A Wave of the Wand. Finish: Popcorn textured.

Upper and built-in walls, closets: Color No. WDPR03. Color: A Wave of the Wand (tinted Pink).

Rails, vertical wood wainscoting, doors, trim; also window and cupboard doors: Color No. WDPR08. Color: Fairest of Them All.

Furniture: Color No. WDPR10. Color: Water Lily.

33-year old 4-shelf/3-drawer unit: Base coat Color No. WDPR03. Color: A Wave of the Wand; Glazed Top coat: Color No. WDPR10 Color: Water Lily. Faux application: Random sponging.

Tops of dresser and night tables: 2-coat Faux glaze. Coat 1: Color No.: WDPR10. Color: Water Lily; Coat 2: Color No. WD FY05. Color: Fairy Flight. Faux application: Sponging, Ragging.

Built-ins and Window Seat Wall: Natural Stain; Sealer/Finish coat: Low-gloss polyurethane.

 

The entire painting project took a little more than a week. I used a large, cleaned out shed to re-finish the furniture pieces. It was equipped with central A/C. All other surfaces and areas were primed and finish-coated inside of the room.

 

PRODUCT MANUFACTURERS
Paints-Primers, finish coats: Glidden’s “Make It Magical with Disney.”

Stains, finish coats: Miniwax sealers, stains, varnishes, polyurethanes.

Artist Paints/Detailing: Liquitex Acrylics.

 

Painting and decorating children’s rooms is a lot of fun. Especially, when the painter is included in the project from the theme, design, color, and pattern selection stage.

  1. Every project is different. Every child’s preferences and needs are unique.
  2. The elements – theme, design, color, pattern – vary a lot.
  3. The products and materials used, in combination, are always one-of-kind.
  4. Working creatively within the budget draws on untapped energy, imagination and resources.
  5. A special sense of satisfaction bubbles forth as a child’s “special space” takes shape.

 

ABOUT SUSIKA
Susika’s completed room was very special for an added reason. She was a war orphan, legally adopted by her only living adult relative: an American military officer. Susika’s mother, the military officer’s sister, was an American educator that taught the children of enlisted officers stationed in the Middle East. Her father was a U. S. educated Middle Eastern professor and administrator.

 

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“My own room! It’s like having my private place in Heaven.”   Susika

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Thank you, fellow painters and decorators, for brightening the lives of others.
And, thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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Decorative Finishing: The Lacquer Table

My childhood home had been an antique shop previously, in the 1950s and early 1960s.

 

Luxurious oriental wallpaper – black silk textured panels – still covered the walls of the largest room. An elegantly dressed Geisha knelt in the center of one of the panels, bordered in etched goldleafing.

 

All of the wallpaper was faded and worn from age. Each panel bore the signs of water damage.

 

On the longest wall was depicted a Teahouse scene. A dainty china tea service set on the low, glass-smooth black lacquer table. For seating, large silk-covered pillows were arranged on the floor. Rice paper sliding door panels could be seen in the background.

 

I did my homework, seated in a red-enameled, round-backed cane chair. Pulled up to a restored circa 1940s oblong, drop leaf table. My wandering eyes floated toward that Teahouse scene. Specifically, the lacquered table.

 

I promised myself that I’d decorate my first dining room in the oriental style.

 

In my early 20s, the inspiration came to design and build a small Oriental table, out of ebony wood.

To get the perfect black, lustrous finish, I applied nine coats of Glidden’s high-gloss enamel. Each coat was allowed to set and “cure,” at least four hours. Then, I did a light and thorough damp feather sanding with No. 1000 sandpaper. Followed by a complete surface “wipe,” using a barely damp, soft muslin cloth.

 

In 2010, the need for a laptop computer table motivated me to build a “lap table” sized version of that lacquer table. I did not apply as many coats of the black, high-gloss finish enamel, because of the lack of workshop space. And, the curing/drying time between coats was reduced – according to outdoor environmental conditions.

 

The mystique remained for the sleek, elegant oriental décor. Yet, a deeper appreciation for the natural in furniture finishing, refinishing, and restoration work had taken over.

 

In early 2013, a couple from Asia stayed at the hotel for over ten days. They were purchasing a second home in Celebration. They showed me two photos of a badly abused, 52-inch square table that came with the house.

 

The couple wanted to shorten the oak table, to 20-inches in height. Then, they wanted to refinish the table. To a mirror-smooth black lacquer. They wanted to do the entire project themselves. With a little guidance from me.

 

The husband and wife team turned out to be very talented. And handy with tools – painting, decorative finishing, and power.

 

One day after work, we met at their new house. A sprawling two-story, with many porches and balconies.

Using a level and steel ruler, we measured and marked the table legs for shortening. By my next visit, the couple had sawed down the legs. Also, they’d carefully cleaned and sanded every inch of the table.

 

At their request, we actually video-cammed the basic procedure:

 

  1. Repairing the table’s cracks, gouges, splinters, etc.
  2. Filling and smoothing out all surface imperfections.
  3. Dry and moist sanding the surfaces multiple times.
  4. Applying a very thin white sealer/primer.
  5. Applying five of the nine finish coats – with very fine, and gentle, sanding between each.

 

By the time the couple applied the fifth finish coat themselves, my job was completed. They had mastered the finishing process, at a high, non-professional level.

 

I never saw the finished Lacquer table. Until June of 2015. The couple and I spotted each other at a Home Depot. They invited me to their home the following week.

 

Upon my arrival, they urged me to take a very close look at their work.

 

“What a beautiful job!” I excitedly told them. And it was!

 

At their beautiful table, they served tea and homemade shortbread wafers, on a set of hand-painted china.

 

By the way, the Lacquer table sets in the middle of their traditional, oriental dining room. In their traditional, oriental decorated home.

 

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Some of the best decorative finishing is done by the most surprising craftspersons.

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Thank you, Tau Hong and Sum Li.

And, thank you everyone for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: Restoring an Antique Finish

If you are looking to retain the value of an antique, do not restore the finish. Leave it as it is.

 

If the future dollar value doesn’t impress you, a new finish, if done properly, will revive an old and worn out look into a complete marvel. Just don’t take it to Antiques Roadshow.

 

Primarily, I recommend “refinishing” to those individuals who have no intention of selling or trading off their antiques. When a particular item is to remain in your home, its condition sould be of significant importance.

 

Too, you may be interested in restoring it to preserve the integrity of the piece.

 

In order to judge it properly, you will need to assess the exact needs of the object. Examine the following:

 

  1. Are there any structural repairs that need to be done? Examples: wood- veneer replacement, re-molding fabrication, joinery, etc.
  2. What is the condition of the hardware? Examples: glass, handles, knobs, hinges. Do they need replacement or reconditioning?
  3. Does it need a thorough cleaning? Recommended: Citrus type cleanser or mild detergent.
  4. What is the condition of the stained, clear-finished surface? Is there an uneven stain pattern? Are there defects in the clear coat (crazing, alligatoring, cracking, etc.)?

 

METHODS OF ANTIQUE SURFACE RE-FINISHING

 

You can remove aged or failed finishes in one of two ways:

  1. Dry sand surface, using # 80-#120 grit sandpaper, depending on the roughness of surface.
  2. Apply varnish remover to loosen all layers of finish. Key here: Treat the surface gently. Try not to scratch the wood at all, or too deeply.

 

BASIC STEPS FOR REFINISHING AN ANTIQUE SURFACE

 

  1. Clean the surface. Use lacquer thinner, or another high evaporating type solvent. Let this dry thoroughly.
  2. Determine the color of stain that you wish to use. Based on the lightness of the stain, you may have to bleach the wood so that the new product can penetrate the surface evenly.
  3. When the surface is dry, apply stain using a two-coat application with a rag and/or sponge. Let dry between coats.
  4. After 24 hours, apply multiple, thin coats of sanding sealer or shellac using spray method. Sand surface between coats, and use tack cloth.
  5. Select either a solvent-based varnish or polyurethane, or an acrylic clear coat as a top coat.
  6. Apply several finish coats by using an HVLP spray system. Lightly sand between each coat. At this point, you can use either a # 400 grit sandpaper, or emery cloth.
  7. After the surface has cured 48 hours, you may apply a polish or wax, specifically designed for wood.

 

In refinishing quality antique pieces, try to prevent scratching the wood surface. The general idea is to remove as little of the existing finish as is necessary. TIP: If a stain color change is planned, the bare wood tone after stripping must be as uniform as possible.

 

Also, by selecting a matte varnish or polyurethane finish, you will be able to camouflage any minor imperfections in the wood.

 

As a form of Nuveau furniture design, separate pieces of wood can be finished with completely different colors of stain and finish. Few people try this. But, the end result exceeds all others. It is highly decorative. And, it has similarities to the Folk Art style.

 

Finally, if you want to retain the full retail value on the antique market, don’t do anything to the piece, other than clean it. And do that very carefully!

 

Final notes: As I’ve learned, each antique piece presents its unique set of signs that it should not be refinished. Each piece presents its unique set of challenges to the person that will be refinishing and/or restoring the piece’s integrity. It is always wise to listen to both messages.

 

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Wise is the painter/finisher who respects the true, and deeper, character of each antique piece.

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Thank you for each visit that you’ve made to “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Decorative Finishing: Goldleafing and Silverleafing

 

A five-foot high wall set on either side of an entry to the new Macy’s in Aventura Mall. Architectural specifications called for each wall to be covered with sheets of pure Silverleaf.

 

A decorative “leafing” artist was engaged to apply the delicate sheets. Originally from Shanghai, she followed the traditional method as she worked with each small square. Slowly, meticulously and patiently.

 

She demonstrated immense respect for, and understanding of the properties of those razor-thin sheets. Harvested from melted, then solidified, then thinly-sliced pure gold.

 

I watched her work, whenever I was prepping or finishing surfaces in the same general area.

 

Periodically, I noticed tiny clues of concern in her eyes. Also, controlled frustration..

 

At long last, she completed the painstaking project. The architect rejected the finished job. The problems were apparent, especially to the artist herself.

 
1. The area – two half walls – was too large for genuine leafing, without any flaws.

2. The Silverleaf sheets were too fragile to guarantee a perfect job.

3. The sheets, which tore very easily, had done so. Especially at certain corners.

4. Leafing was tedious-intensive work, that could not be rushed – eg. by a deadline.

 

Macy Stores’ executives opted for complete removal of the Silverleaf.

 

After removal of the Silverleafing…

…my job started.

 

First, I prepped the entire surface area to its original “new construction” condition.

Next, I primed both walls.

Last, I painted the walls in acrylic enamel. Very attractive. Not beautiful like the Silverleaf.

 

About my “Leafing”  experience… 

 

I’ve done small leafing applications – eg. silver, gold, copper. Examples: Columns, frames of murals, walls, furniture, mirror frames (small, large), trims, railings.

 

Each beautiful when completed. And, as each sheet and every section came out perfect, I was thrilled.

 

TIPS for LEAFING

 

1. Use proper adhesive prep. – eg. Rabbit glue.

2. Use hair blow dryer to lay leaf down.

3. Make sure burnishing tools are polished.

4. Use Badger Hair mop or comb for brushing down leaf.

5. Make sure gilding pad stays firm, yet soft.

6. When applying a sealer or clear finish, use airbrush or detail spray cup gun.

7. Wear rubber-soled shoes to help eliminate static electricity.

8. Use an artificial leaf when speed and productivity are required – eg. commercial application.

9. When learning, compare application methods to see which one is easiest for you to perform.

10. Try leafing on ornamental object, with a smooth surface. This helps to diversify your capability.

 

Try these small “leafing” projects to get you started – and to learn the craft:

 

1. Wooden jewelry box

2. Candlesticks, or simple candelabra

3. Lamp base, or smaller mirror frame

4. Wood molding, chair rail, crown

5. Cabinetry molding – smooth surface, simple design and construction

6. Door or drawer knob or handle

7. Desk-top picture frame

 

“Leafing” is an art. A fantastic outlet for a painter’s finer creative aspirations.

 

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No need to turn over a new leaf. Just cover a little surface of your life with Gold or Silver.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Hotel Painting with Bob: 2016 and Beyond

Out with the old,  and in with the new!

 

Welcome, everyone, to a new year of painting projects.
 

 

YEAR 2016 can be viewed in all sorts of new and fascinating ways.

 

If you haven’t done so in the past, let your creativity flow. Generate new ideas for decorating your living spaces and your businesses.

 

WHY? And, is it within our budget?

 

You can “THINK BIG,” yet start small, if you wish. Or, you can treat it – any new or upgrading project – as an investment for the future.

 

Painting and decorating has been around for a long time. Even the Egyptians adorned their buildings with vivid colors and figurative designs. They expressed themselves to demonstrate the value they placed on their way of life.

 

You, too, can “express the best” that your hotel or resort stands for! 

 

Repaint the walls of your lobby, public restrooms, guest rooms/suites or villas, etc. in colors which express your hotel or resort’s inner spirit – and attitude toward life. And, your guests!

 

Refinish pieces of furniture to renew their value. To give them a big lift!

 

Texture and/or Faux Finish a ceiling to create depth and variety in the surface appeal.

 

Spray finish exterior furniture to create a fresh, inviting, and durable look. You can even apply a decorative finish for a traditional or classic appeal.

 

What you can keep in mind is this:

 

Whatever “environment” you are thinking about painting or refinishing, let your creativity be your guide. Just go for it!

 

Don’t hold back.

 

And, if you are in doubt as to the right procedure to follow? Seek a certified, journey-level painter and decorator to help you out. Someone more experienced than you. Someone with a more extensive background in an area that you want to tackle.

 

Or, just go for it! And, paint it for yourself.

 

Either way, the outcome will revive your property. And, rejuvenate you, too.
Let the use of paint, color, and texture inspire you. Excite you. Lift you. Challenge you. Renew you.

 

HAVE A FRUITFUL NEW YEAR, EVERYONE!

 

And, remember:

 

No painting project is too small, if you see it will add joy to the lives of teammates and managers, guests and visitors. No painting project is too small, if you see it will add joy to your life. Both on and off the job!

 

Robert “Bob” Hajtovik

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Thanks for visiting ” Painting with Bob,” a painting blog with spirit.

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

Paola the Painter’s As Told-To Story from Madrid

 

For her fifteenth birthday, Teresa wanted “patriotic” walls. The colors of her country, Spain: Red and Gold. In two weeks, she was having a sleep-over. She wanted her bedroom to be perfect.

 

So, her father, Mario, called his brother, Stefan, at the hotel, where he worked as Concierge II.

 

“Leave this to me,” Stefan told his brother.

 

Two days later, Paola, house painter, arrived at the two-story flat on Av de Pablo, near Retiro District, in Madrid. He carried an arm load of empty boxes into the house.

 

Clearing out the space…

 

He removed the teenager’s posters and pictures, taped to the walls of her room. He placed her treasures into boxes. He removed the sheets, coverlet and pillows from her bed, and put them safely into the largest box.

 

Paola rolled up Teresa’s faded green rug. He pushed her furniture to the center of the room. He covered them with “three large old sheets.”

 

Next, he hurried down to his economie automobile. He returned, carrying supplies: three buckets of paint, brushes, a roller, and three covers; a large dropcloth; a new 6-foot stepladder; and, a long narrow cardboard box. A curious, retired neighbor man volunteered to help.

 

The painter stretched out the dropcloth, careful to cover the wood floor from corner to corner. He began to ready his supplies.

 

Teresa’s Surprise No. 1…

 

Teresa returned home late that evening. After her classes, and part-time job at the family la panaderia (bakery). Wide painter’s masking tape stretched across the doorway of her room. A large sign was posted onto the door.

 

“Teresa, Sleep with your sister tonight. Love, Mama and Poppo.”

 

Paola began the work…

 

First, he dusted, sanded and wiped off every surface to be finished.

 

Next, Paola painted…

 

  1. He painted the top half of three walls a “delicate” Yellow Gold. Equivalent to Lily SW 6693. In semi-gloss latex

 

  1. Then, he painted the bottom. half of three walls. Walls 1 and 2: “Deepened Red.” Equivalent to Real Red SW 6869; Wall 3: “Deepened Sun Gold. “ Equivalent to Glitzy Gold SW 6691.

 

  1. He installed wallpaper on Wall 4: Narrow bright Yellow-Gold stripes on bright White background. (Paper had subtle sheen.)

 

  1. Next, mid-way on all four walls, he nailed in place railing strips. Painted bright White. The railing was Paola’s personal gift to Teresa.

 

  1. Last, he painted the door frame, window trim, and baseboards that same “lightened” Yellow Gold, SW 6693. Paint: High-gloss latex.

 

Teresa’s Birthday Surprise…

 

By the time Teresa returned home from classes the next day, a big surprise waited. Her mother and sister smiled. Her father sat in the kitchen, waiting.

 

“Hi, Mama. Poppo, you’re early from work. Did something happen?” They only smiled back.

 

She walked down the hall to her bedroom. Her parents and sister followed. The sign and tape had been removed from her door. She opened the door. A loud scream filled the air.

 

“FANTASTIQUE”

 

The “patriotics” of her beloved Spain filled the room. From the ceiling to the floor.

 

The Finishing Touches to Teresa’s Room…

 

Over Teresa’s old bed laid a quilted coverlet and matching pillow shams. Fabric: Cotton Chintz. Colors and Pattern: dainty Red Carnation floral .Window curtains, made of the same fabric, hung at her tall window. The pieces were a special gift from Uncle Stefan. Paola’s wife, a seamstress, had made them.

 

Younger sister, Traci, handed her a package. “These are for you. I made them. Mama helped.”

 

Inside were three small, square pillows. One was covered in a solid Red nubby fabric, one in a solid shiny Gold, the third in a bright Lime Green.

 

Tears spilled from the teenager’s eyes. Lately, she’d been feeling overwhelmed. Unappreciated, too. (Her schedule.)

 

What a difference a little paint job made in a teenager’s life!

 

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Paint something for a young person in your life. Send a smile into her or his soul.

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Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: The Dresser!

You probably see your dresser every morning. “What am I going to wear?”

 

Does it appeal to you as much as the items in it? Or, does it leave a dull impression every time you are around it? Or think about it?

 

Over a course of years, your dresser may have lost its allure also. This can be fixed easily.

 

By washing, sanding and painting, your worn out-looking dresser can appear like new. Spend a few dollars. Apply a lot of elbow grease. And, it can become a major attraction in your home.

 

Follow these steps. And, you’ll be on your way.

 

1. Find a place you can work.

A. Select a place with good ventilation.

B. Lay a drop cloth or some plastic sheeting on the floor.

C. Place your dresser on top.

D. Also, place blocks of wood underneath, so the piece doesn’t rest directly on the floor.

 

2. Take a screwdriver and remove all hardware – eg. handles and knobs.

A. Wood: Clean gently with mild soap and warm water.

B. Metal: Clean gently with mild soap or baking soda and warm water. Polish with metal polish.

C. Brass: Clean gently with mild soap or baking soda and warm water. Polish with brass polish.

 

3. Wash the surfaces of the dresser.

A. Use a sponge, cleaning brushes, and a suitable detergent.

B. Pay special attention to drawer edges, molding and crevices on drawer faces.

C. Rinse with warm water.

D. Let air dry; or force dry with heat gun or hair dryer.

 

4. Sand entire surface.

A. Use #220 sand paper or sanding block.

B. Fill imperfections with wood filler.

C. Let dry.

D. Then, sand smooth.

 

5. Wipe the entire surface down.

A. Use a tack cloth to remove any dust residue.

 

6. Apply a thin coating of primer to the whole surface.

A. Use a brush, and a low nap roller cover, three-sixteenth.

B. Or apply by spray painting.

C. Using spray cans may render a very fine job – whether you’re a painter or consumer.

D. Conventional spray or HVLP equipment is recommended, and generally used, by professional painters. Consumers that do a lot of painting, including furniture refinishing, also rely on spray equipment to get the job done.

 

7. Lightly sand surface once more, when the primer has dried thoroughly.

A. Use #220 sandpaper or #400 wet sand until surface is smooth.

B. Wipe down with tack cloth.

 

8. Apply the finish (top) coat using same method as in step 6.

A. A hard enamel or oil finish is desired.

B. I have found that an automotive grade acrylic enamel works quite well, also.

Note: It is highly durable and has superior color retention and wash ability. It does cost a little more than conventional paint.

 

9. Let the dresser’s new finish dry completely. A full 24 hours is ideal.

 

10. Re-install your hardware. Slide in the drawers and you’re all set.

A. Your dresser will look as good as your clothes inside it.

B. New-style tip: Change the hardware: Hinges, knobs, drawer pulls, etc.

 

A THINK TWICE TIP: Is your dresser an antique? 

  1. Carefully and gently clean with a soft cloth.
  2. Repair only the necessary parts of it.
  3. Gently rub linseed oil into all wood surfaces. Apply with the grain.
  4. Do not paint unless the piece has lost all of its value.
  5. CAREFUL! Most antique pieces of furniture maintain, even increase, in worth because of their signs of age, and their imperfections.

 

Want to perfect your skills even more? Or, do you want to try a similar creative project?

Maybe, your child’s dresser needs a facelift, too.
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DRESS YOUR DRESSER FOR SUCCESS!
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Have a great day!  And, thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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