Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

Posts tagged ‘graphics’

Designing with Graphics Using Wallcoverings

 

Rainbow Farm in Vinyl

Blue Sphere

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Various types of wall covering can be applied to achieve part or all of your chosen graphic design. The possibilities are endless because a very wide selection is available.

 

About “Rainbow Farm in Vinyl”: Graphic design covers two adjacent corner walls. Overall dimensions: 42 feet length by 9 feet height. Design features abstract symbols of a modern recreation farm: buildings and structures, flowers and gardens, fields with lush crops, animals, Christmas tree nursery, vehicles. Templated symbols were cut from commercial-grade vinyls. The variety of colorful and textured remnants came from two large elementary school projects.

 

About “Blue Sphere”: Graphics free-form stripe wraps around two adjacent walls, trailing into a large walk-in closet. Overall dimensions: 12 feet-to-8 feet-to-9 feet length by 8 feet-to-6 feet height. Design features one graduated, 12-inch to 8-inch horizontal stripe. Free-style form was cut from mini-pebble textured commercial vinyl, spliced into already-installed off-white decorative stone-textured ceiling-to-floor commercial vinyl.

 

The layout is similar to the painting process. The work can be compared to doing a puzzle.

 

Before you can install the wallcovering, many pieces of various sizes and shape will have to be fashioned.

 

Each separate piece will need to be pasted with the appropriate adhesive or paste. NOTE: Some will require vinyl paste while others may need wheat or cellulose.

 

The following process is meant for the skilled paperhanger.

 

CREATING TEMPLATES FOR WALLCOVERING PIECES

 

1. Create a paper sketch of wall area.

 

2. Sketch in your design to scale.

 

3. Use grid paper, or graphic software program. Example: 1 inch = 1 foot.

A. Number each piece within design.

B. Use larger grid paper to transfer shapes to full-size.

C. Gridded architectural or engineering paper works great for this.

D. Be certain to number each piece to correspond to piece’s number in sketch.

 

INSTALLING/APPLYING WALLCOVERING PIECES INTO GRAPHIC DESIGN

 

1. To apply wallcovering to stripe areas, pre-trim pieces on zinc strip to fit.

 

2. Then, paste material. Be sure to use the paste/adhesive appropriate for that piece.

 

TIP: I’ve used small, neon-colored sticky notes to “label” front of each piece. Here’s how:

On 8 ½ inch by 14 inch paper, I’ve made a chart. I glued tiny sample of each type of wallcovering to be used. Next, I wrote the type of paste/adhesive to be used for that type of covering. Then, I assigned a neon color sticky note to each type, and adhered one alongside the corresponding wallcovering sample.

 

3. Butt (align) the seams of the pieces and smooth out wallcovering.

 

4. When several pieces are fitted, use a straight edge and razor knife to trim excess to even out any edge or seam joint. Much patience is needed here.

 

5. Where irregular sized and shaped pieces are to fit irregular sized and shaped pieces, I recommend one or both of the following methods:

 

  1. Method 1: Pre-cut each piece.
  2. Match each piece to a template, before adhering to wall with paste/adhesive.
  3. Several pieces, that will adjoin each other, can be trimmed and matched together at the paste table before applying.

 

  1. Method 2: Overlap the seams of adjoining pieces.
  2. Double-cut through the two layers.
  3. With straight lines, trimming is easy.

 

TIP 1: When making curved or arched cuts, always make up plastic templates that precisely match the curvature of the penciled line. Normally, you will need only a half dozen to allow for the making of your other cuts.

 

TIP 2: Change your razor blades more regularly.

 

6. Smooth all wall covering in multiple directions to remove creases and bubbles.

 

7. Using a seam roller, press down all seams and edges.

 

8. Use just enough pressure to adhere the wallcovering piece to the substrate.

 

9. Work quickly while ensuring a perfect job.

 

10. Wash the seam roller as needed.

 

TIP: In some instances, it is invaluable to use special seam glue and a heat gun to manipulate the material more precisely.

 

Remember: All wall coverings are not applied using the same method.

 

TIP: If various types of coverings are used, be ready to work with each one a little differently to fit each piece of the graphics together.

 

A large graphic design project . . .

 

On one occasion, I applied a vinyl graphics design in a corridor over one hundred and fifty feet long. It turned out magnificent in the end. However, it was difficult to achieve. The entire length of the hallway set on a slope. And the stripes and curves, that made up the design, were at eye level.

 

When doing graphics using wallcovering, both patience and precision are required to achieve favorable results.

 

And remember: Create a sample first!

 

Footnote: Fortunately, creating great graphics using wallcoverings is a breeze, compared to trying to transfer media files into this post. Any tips from anyone?  Thanks in advance!

****************************************************

Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.” Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

PAINTING AND DECORATING: THE HOTEL PENTHOUSE

A Central Florida hotel gave me the choice of three redecorating projects:

 

  1. larger penthouse,
  2. front lobby, or
  3. outdoor children’s play-town.

 

I opted for the penthouse. The other two projects were put on hold by the property management company.

 

Why the penthouse project got my vote: The diversity of creative decorating opportunities.

 

  1. Interior work – A/C, controlled environment.
  2. Fine finishing surfaces: paneling, columns, furniture.
  3. Lots of wallcovering installation, including mural.
  4. Custom color matching: paint-to-patterned wallcoverings.
  5. Faux finishing.
  6. Minimal traffic
  7. Management’s style, commitment and candor.

 

I scheduled the project into twelve main phases:

 

  1. Needs assessment by room, area, square footage, surface conditions, and preparation requirements.
  2. Products, materials, supplies costing-to-budget allotment; selection and coordination; quantity estimating and computation; requisitioning to purchasing.
  3. Wood furniture and woodwork stripping or bleaching.
  4. Wallcovering removal.
  5. Ceilings, walls, doors repairing, patching, filling.
  6. Wood repairing, filling, sanding, sealing.
  7. Ceilings, walls priming.
  8. Woodwork, doors, furniture re-staining and light sanding.
  9. Painting.
  10. Woodwork, doors, furniture finishing.
  11. Wallpaper and mural hanging.
  12. Faux finishing.

 

I was responsible for all aspects of the project except:

 

  1. delivery delays of custom wallcoverings and murals,
  2. purchasing department delays, errors, etc.

 

The one twist: The hotel president’s wife, a retired ASID member, would be included in the selection of the wallcoverings, and murals. In reality, the lady showed up on site once a week during the entire project. She put herself “to work.” She helped whichever hotel maintenance technician may have been assisting me on that day.

 

The project moved right along.
Complete shutdown was needed only two days – carpenter, plumber, tile man. The flooring people installed new carpeting after I completed my work. Note: I waited to re-install the re-finished baseboards until after the flooring was installed.

 

A FEW TIPS FOR ANY SIMILAR PROJECT THAT YOU MAY BE CONSIDERING

 

Before you sign on, you might want to do the following:

 

  1. Find out where the hotel’s purchasing manager orders the bulk of paint products and wallpaper materials.
  2. Clear with management – get it in writing – for YOU to be the person that visits the paint store and communicates with product/material representatives.
  3. Set it up so that YOU are the person that puts together the actual requisition order schedule and lists, for the purchasing manager to follow.
  4. Get a list – in writing – of all other work that will be taking place in the area. See that it includes the approximate “schedule blocks” of work days for every other craftsperson. Examples: carpenters, electricians, plumbers, tile installers, drywall installers.

 

BEST CASE SCENARIO:

 

  1. Hotel management sets it up and authorizes YOU to actually do the ordering from suppliers.
  2. You work under ONE member of management.
  3. You have access to other members of organization – supervisors, managers, staff – as needed.
  4. Feedback from managers is limited, and direct. No filtering through a chain of people.
  5. Project inspections are limited, and conducted by person(s) with authority to assist and act.
  6. “Sightseeing” visits by managers and staff members are kept to minimum, even discouraged.

 

HOW THINGS WENT:

  1. The hotel’s staff was friendly, helpful and totally enthusiastic. Especially the staff painter, and the engineering department, as a whole.
  2. The project came off without any major glitch – eg. shipment delay of custom wallcoverings.
  3. The project came in under budget – a surprise, even to me.
  4. The project was completed one week early. (Another surprise.)
  5. The carpenters, electricians, plumbers, drywallers, and tile installers stuck to the master schedule – and theirs. Great teams!
  6. Final inspections came off with only minor changes.
  7. The hotel management company signed off promptly.
  8. The hotel’s principal owner flew in for a final walk-through – and “staff only open house.”

 

Would I pick that “penthouse project” again? Yes! Though it was the first one that I’d worked on solo. And, it was the largest: over 4,000 square feet, including the veranda.

 

TIP FOR TOP QUALITY INTERIOR FINISHERS:

 

Ask around. There’s bound to be a hotel, resort, or residential penthouse somewhere that needs your special, fine touch. If nothing else, offer to help the staff painter get it into shining shape again.

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Special thanks to everyone that has helped others do a great job at their chosen work.

And, thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Tag Cloud