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Posts tagged ‘hotel management’

Cocoa Beach Hotel Faces Changes Head On

In March, a hotel GM in Cocoa Beach invited me to stay there for several days. It was the idea of the property management company that had contacted me, way back in 2013, about a position.

 

“Pack a clean set of whites,” had been added at the end of the email. Curious. I did as requested, and headed for the ocean.

 

For the next three days, the hotel’s painter and management company regional director of operations led me around the property. They pointed out surfaces that needed work. They walked me through areas they wanted to improve. They showed me themes and color schemes that the owners wanted to change. And, they made lots of notes on their iPads.

 

The fourth day, we revisited some of those areas. Then, we sat at a small shaded table, and went over the men’s notes. By that time, typed into a hard copy for each of us.

 

Usually, that’s when “the best laid plan hits the fan” (my paraphrase). What the budget can bear differs a lot from the combined needs and wish lists. And, available time and manpower.

 

Not in this case. Everyone at the decision table has been motivated – and ready to move.

 

For example: Here’s what has happened within the last month and a half.

 

  1. A local general contractor was hired to repair and upgrade guest rooms and suites, two restaurants, game room, health club, children’s playground, and part of the conference center.

 

  1. A specialty contractor has signed on to remodel the main kitchen, and public restrooms.

 

  1. The GM has been authorized to add three people to the engineering staff for two full years.

All three will start work August 01, 2017. Each will handle specific aspects of the property upgrade.

 

  1. Grounds-landscaping specialist – Redesign and re-landscape the front entrance, nature sanctuary, rest, and walkway areas.
  2. HVAC and OSHA specialist – Handle vent system cleaning, filter installation, room thermostat replacements, bathroom fan/ventilation system cleaning and repairs.
  3. Painter – Prepping and repainting all areas designated on the improvement list.

 

Each of the three new engineering employees worked previously at, or on, the hotel property.

 

Each is a certified specialist in his or her trade.

 

Each is proficient in English and Spanish. One also speaks and writes Portuguese and Mandarin Chinese.

 

Each is related to a current hotel staff member.

 

Few engineering departments are able to gain three additional workers at once. Fewer have the luxury to employ three specialists at once.

 

It is done more readily in other parts of the U. S. It can be done when both the hotel management and owners are operating on the same wave length. At the same time.

 

An exciting thing to see in action – to be a part of – when it happens.

 

 

“Together… making a place for the human spirit to find ease, if only for one night’s stay…”

 From: Somewhere Safe with Somebody Good, by Jan Karon. Copyright 2015.

 

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As always! Many thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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Hotel/Facility Painters: Is Outsourcing Your Paintshop Services in Your Future?

It should come as no surprise to any hotel/resort staff member, when the news arrives that the management and operations of a certain department will be outsourced.

 

Other mid-to-large sized for-profit employers have been farming or “outsourcing” for needed services for years. More and more local, county and state governments have been contracting out for the management and operation of entities under their umbrella.

 

What throws a hard, curve ball is when the outsourcing company is going to move in its own people to staff that department, which is a part of the organization. EXAMPLES: Food and Beverage/Catering, Pools and Gazebos, Housekeeping/Laundry, Security, Sales, Conventions.

 

With a large department, the outsourcing company may opt to employ certain existing hotel staff members. Persons experienced working in that area, and with its targeted guests and visitors.

 

Usually, these persons need to complete new, pre-employment forms for the external company. Including for federal and state tax withholdings. Usually, the persons do not need to go through the hotel’s Human Resources’ job application and screening process.

 

So far, hotel engineering departments have been exempted from the contracted outsourcing system of employment. Some exceptions exist.

 

  1. The property owners decide to outsource the management and operations of the entire hotel business. Here, existing staff can sign on with the external company, or a designated staffing company.

 

  1. The outsourcing company “out-sources” the hotel’s engineering department services.

Note: Designated staff members may be able to apply to the outside company, to continue to work at the same hotel.

 

  1. The outsourcing company decides to switch engineering operations to a temporary and on-call arrangement. For all positions and tasks, or for certain positions and tasks.

Note: Usually, some of the current engineering staff members are offered the opportunity to work in his/her current – or a similar – position, but as a temporary or on-call worker.

 

In all cases, some positions are eliminated. Some job quotas are reduced. A lot of department re-organization takes place.

 

In smaller businesses – eg. hotels and inns, clinics, hospitals – the services of a full-time painter may not be needed any longer. They may not be affordable. Within the budget.

 

Thus, the career hotel/facility painter needs to be ready to adapt. And, to switch “employers,” if and when the time comes.

 

At the same time, take note!

 

Not all outsourcing arrangements work. Many get axed at some point. Department management and operations are returned to in-house people. Former staff members may be re-hired. Experienced employees are put back in charge of operating their respective department.

 

After reasonable tries, more city and county governments are voting against renewing their contracts with outsourcing companies. Businesses are tightening up qualifications and expectations for their outsourcing contractors. They are more closely, and accurately, computing the bottom line.

  1. “Are we really saving money? “
  2. “What’s the trade-off been within – and for – our community?”

Hotels and resorts are listening to their experienced staff members, about major organizational and ethical problems dealing with the outsource company’s people. Hospitals report losing once loyal employees and community support. Also they report an increase in serious liability quality-of-service and patient treatment issues.

 

What can a hotel painter do to influence top management and owners in deciding which way to go?

 

  1. Show a greater and more sincere interest in your hotel, and especially in your teammates. What’s really going on with them? What’s great, so-so, not good at all? Share in any on-going dialogue among your coworkers. Your bosses, too. TIP: Hold back a little here. Keep “person,” “personal,” and “personality” out of this.
  2. Show an interest in the “outsourcing” discussion. Periodically, exchange a few ideas with your chief engineer. Especially, if you’re the lead painter and help him handle a lot of the troubleshooting.
  3. Discreetly ask questions. Try to find out the reasons management is looking at outsourcing your job. Or, the entire engineering department.

 

THEN, ZERO IN ON YOUR POSITION…YOUR FUTURE.

 

  1. Update the hotel’s job description for your job. Provide a clear, detailed picture of exactly what you do there. Include both standard and special skills and abilities that your hotel’s painter must have. To get the job done! NOTE: Now is not the time to underestimate and undervalue what the real job entails. Now is not the time for humility.
  2. List the types of tasks, orders, projects, and emergency jobs you have done. Estimate the frequency with which you’ve done each. Indicate the location of each on the property. TIP: Keep your own on-site painter’s photo gallery up to date, and captioned!
  3. List the customer service functions you perform. That includes for team members, fellow staff members, managers; guests, visitors; suppliers, vendors, contractors; inspectors; and the community.
  4. Offer your experience and insight as input to the (a) chief engineer and (b) general manager. Limit what you offer in information to details that will positively support your bosses’ true position. Also, their short-range and long-range goals.

 

Final Note: As the staff painter, you are often in a unique and influential position. You tend to come into regular contact with coworkers and managers in many of the departments and work areas within the hotel’s organization. You tend to “brush shoulders” with certain aspects of the hotel or facility’s actual business.

 

Bottom Line: You may be able to play a key role in management’s decision to outsource. Or not.

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“Press toward the mark that you want to leave behind.”  RDH

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2012, 2015, 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Changes and Advancements in Hotel/Facility Painting, Part 3: Supplies, Tools and Equipment

Introduction

 
The standard types of painting tools and equipment will always be in use, as long as the paint products go unchanged in how they are applied. Paint spray equipment applications are not to be replaced. They are only approved upon by making subtle changes to spray guns and paint pumping systems.

When it relates to the roller cover, its design is continually being re-examined for ways to improve its performance, primarily with new materials. Widely used tools and equipment are difficult to replace. Changes in supplies mean costly changes to a system which is already operating efficiently.

 

  1. Changes and Advancements in Supplies:

A. Abrasives, caulking, patching compounds, masking materials, and other items. Changes: meet the demands of structural components and newer surfaces, also environmental changes.

B. Sanding products produced for wet or dry use. Option: Abrasives affixed to a sponge type substrate, allowing greater flexibility.

C. Caulking produced as waterborne and siliconized. Advantages: Resist cracking, and provide waterproofing, while allowing the surface to be painted.

D. Patching compounds that dry faster and harder. Advantages: sand easier, allow painting sooner.

E. Masking tapes designed to be left on the surface longer. Advantages: Do not pull the surface loose, and make re-taping unnecessary.

 

Comments about Supplies:

Commonly used supplies have advanced little. They tend to fulfill the need, in an efficient manner, for which they have been designed.

The quality of supplies must not be overlooked. They are your aid in producing a quality painting or finishing job. They sure can make it easier. By the way, a poorly adhering masking tape is not going to do you any favors.

 

  1. Changes and Advancements in Tools:

A. More paint brushes designed for applying multiple types of coating. Brush hairs are a composite of nylon, polyester, olefin, and other synthetic fibers.

B. Roller frames designed to reduce the friction of the roller covers. Added feature: control the covers from slipping off of the roller frames.

C. Roller covers, with new developments in nap composition. Advantages: Optimal nap composition which lasts longer, and is durable with various coatings.

D. Advancements that consider the ergonomics of a tool’s use. Example: Joint knife, which must be very strong and flexible. It must provide an excellent grip and balance for effective use.

 

Comments about Tools:

Advancements in tools are needed, especially when a product or material has no way of being applied. A tool must be designed, tested, fabricated, and marketed to industry, business and public consumers.

 

  1. Changes and Advancements in Equipment:

 A. Fine finishing, hand-held and airless portable spray system. Designed for ease of use by the professional painter and finisher. Homeowner/general consumer models: easier to operate, clean, and maintain.

B. Masking machines that are easy to manipulate in taping procedures. Normally for commercial, residential and automotive painting.

C. Spray pumps designed for easier use by the homeowner/general consumer market. Features: lighter weight, easy to set up, simple to clean up. Pressure fluid: maintained electronically.

 

Comments about Equipment:

Changes in equipment occur when use and testing point to an area of design which can be improved. I consider advancements, something which really alters the marketing of a piece of equipment.
What marks a more advanced piece of equipment? Some key features: greater performance, more energy efficient, more ergonomics, and increased durability.

 

Closing Comments about Painting Supplies, Tools and Equipment:

A successful painting project requires that all intended and needed supplies, tools and equipment are available, reliable and qualitative. Consistently, they must help the painter to (1) produce above-standard workmanship, (2) achieve satisfactory-plus results, and (3) ensure cost-effective durability.

 

PAINTER’S TIPS: Wisely choose each supply, tool and piece of equipment. Then, care and maintain each one properly. Maximize its potential usefulness and effectiveness on future projects, work orders and tasks. You’ll be glad that you did.

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Even the most advanced supply, tool, or piece of equipment is only as effective as the painter using it.

Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2014, 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Hotel Painting During Slow Seasons

 

In lodging, the slow season varies in different regions of the country – even in certain areas within a given state.

 

The climate – weather – has a lot to do with it. So do school terms, vacation times – both school and employment; busy seasons in a specific industry, trade or business.

 

In Florida, the slow season tends to fall between the second week of January through March, or even April.

 

If you’re a staff painter working in Florida, the slower season is a good time to get things done. Fewer guests and visitors, fewer emergency calls and work orders, and fewer interruptions.

 

But, the “slow season” is also the period of lower revenues, lowered budget, and much fewer resources.

 

If you’re a contract painter, the slower period may be the right time to branch out and to do some freelance work.

 

SIX SLOW SEASON SOLUTIONS FOR THE STAFF PAINTER

 

  1. Before Day 1 of the slow season, decide with your chief engineer (a) what work orders and projects must stay on the roster, and (b) what projects must be shelved.
  2. Take a closer look at that list of necessary work orders and projects. Whittle it down by 25 percent.
  3. Then, prioritize those according to daily and weekly jobs.
  4. Next, establish a budget, or cost estimate, for each – based on the supplies needed to do each.
  5. Take a closer look. You may see that the list of necessary work orders and projects can be shortened. Example: Working on “bathrooms re-paint” project can be spread out over a longer period of time. Say five bathrooms a week or every two weeks, versus five a day.
  6. The toughest time: Shelve the “necessary” work orders and projects that require the most outlay of money for materials and supplies. Note: That may be the most money for few supplies.                  TIP: This amount may end up being your allotment for paintshop emergencies. Your contingency fund.
  7. Now you’re ready to schedule out your work load for each week during the dry spell, budget-wise.
  8. Be prepared for additional cutbacks (a) across-the-board organizationally, then (b) unilaterally throughout your Engineering Department.
  9. When you’re asked or expected to perform paintshop miracles during an already “bare bones” massive budget freeze, here’s what you do next:
  10. GET CREATIVE. GET TOUGH. GET WISE.

 

Seek out and volunteer to perform other essential tasks in your department – eg. maintenance, grounds. Volunteer to split your work-day time. Help out in another busier department that has also suffered staff cutbacks – eg. housekeeping, kitchen, guest services

 

Your bottom line objectives during any slow season:

  1. Keep the paintshop running.
  2. Keep your job.

 

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“Slower season” does not mean it’s the time for you to slow down on the job.

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Thank you for staying on task, whatever your regular job description.

 

Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob” blog.

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Paintshop: 21st Century Work Partners: Software Programs and Hand-Held Devices

Twenty-seven year old painter Ben got a big shock when he returned to work after a two-week vacation.

 

“Effective immediately…” started the memo. A hand-held tablet would be his “work partner” wherever he went throughout each work day.

 

Using the device, he would be expected to perform the following functions on a daily basis:

 

  1. Clock in and clock out.
  2. Select from list the exact tasks and work orders he would be completing that day.
  3. Select from list the project(s) he would be working on – and the stage of each.
  4. Select products, materials and supplies he would be using for each task, work order and project. That included colors by name and manufacturer product number.
  5. List each work order as it came to him, indicating the start, pause/delay and completion times of each; list of products, supplies and tools for each; brief description of problem(s) incurred; and, future recommendations.
  6. List quantity/amount of each product, material and supply used.
  7. Submit weekly requisitions for basic products, materials and supplies needed to work on any painting task within the next two weeks.
  8. Record when requisition orders were filled, then when supplies were actually delivered.
  9. Maintain paintshop inventory on weekly basis.
  10. Log all communications with supervisor(s) related to each task, work order and project.
  11. Maintain contact list of manufacturers’ representatives, supply stores, sales staffs, etc.

 

In other words, a fair percentage of Ben’s work time would be spent using the hand-held device.

 

“I don’t have a problem with it,” he e-mailed. “But it cuts into my actual painting time like you wouldn’t believe.” He added that he needed to share more details about how the system worked. “No time.”

 

“What’s nice about it is, at any time, I can plug my hand-held into any printer at the hotel, and print out a copy of any file, communication, list, worksheet, chart, color palette sheet, etc. That’s been a big help.”

 

Ben added that the devices are kept in the department when not in use. Locked up at the end of the day in a cabinet inside the chief engineer’s office.

 

I think the concept is great. And full access to a hand-held device with a top quality painting or paintshop software program can save the painter a lot of paperwork, time, and money. Especially when the painter is allowed ample control about how he uses it.

 

RECOMMENDED PAINTER/PAINTING CONTRACTOR SOFTWARE PROGRAMS

1. General and cross-function: www.getjobber.com; www.knowify.com; www.go.intouchinsight.com;

2. Estimating, bidding, invoicing: www.paintestimating.com; www.invoice2go-enterprise.com; www.quickpaintingproposals.com; 3. Business: www.CorkCRM.com.

 

By the way, most of the above online software companies offers an APP version. Ben suggested checking into the possibility of purchasing/downloading and interfacing two or more systems.

 

“Your paintshop and engineering department may need to use more than one program to cover your bases. Also, your department might need to sit down with an IT creative and develop a few custom sub-programs. Example: A running and cross-referencing inventory list.”

 

Thanks, Ben, for the information.

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Smart paintshop practices include whatever support systems and devices that will make work easier. 

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Thanks to everyone for revisiting “Painting with Bob” in 2017.

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s View: Why This Matters

Millions of people, including independent painters, scramble to find individual health insurance coverage for 20117. Staff painters collapse under the strain of paying sharply increased premiums and higher out-of-pocket costs, for health coverage under their employer-employee group plans.

 

WHY THIS MATTERS

 

Simultaneously, president-elect Donald J. Trump contradicts a pledge to President Barack Obama to retain and improve the provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). And, he appoints, to Secretary of the Treasury, the Wall Street mogul Steven Mnuchin – the top congressional strategist against the ACA to engineer and guarantee its repeal by Congress by mid-2017.

 

WHY THIS MATTERS

 

Figures released November 30, 2016, estimate that over 20 million Americans will lose their health insurance in 2017, if the ACA is repealed. This means they and their families will lose access to preventive care. It means that persons with any pre-existing medical condition or history, even any acquired on the job, will no longer be able to get health insurance policies. And, even employer-employee group plans will groan under the weight of extensive riders.

 

WHY THIS MATTERS

 

At least 20 million households, of persons under Medicare age of 65, will no longer have access to preventive healthcare such as immunizations for flu, pneumonia, polio, TB, and shingles. They will no longer have access to affordable health maintenance benefits such as fitness/exercise clubs, nutrition programs and psychological counseling.

 

WHY THIS MATTERS

 

Workers will not be able to properly handle and manage their own fitness, wellness and health. Workmen’s compensation recovery periods will be much shorter. Family Care and Leave Act provisions will be sharply reduced; and employee jobs will not be reserved.

 

WHY THIS MATTERS

 

Hourly workers, such as painters, will need to return to work – after injury, illness, surgery – before their physicians and surgeons consider it safe and healthy to do so. Instead, workers will need to get back on the job very promptly to prevent (a) job loss; (b) future unemployability and uninsurability; and (c) personal/family financial insolvency.

 

WHY THIS MATTERS

 

All employment opportunities will be available only to persons whose health ratings are above 80 percentile, credit score is higher than 800, and educational level is at or above the STEM or Master’s level.

 

WHY THIS MATTERS

 

We will have come full circle. Job loss, unemployability and financial insolvency, in the midst of the collapse of the U. S’s health care and insurance systems, will be a no-win solution for everyone. Even the employed, employable and financially solvent. Even the billionaires that the president-elect will have serving in top White House posts, starting January 20, 2017.

 

WHY THIS MATTERS

 

Who sits in the Oval Office won’t matter then. Who sits on the White House Cabinet won’t matter. Who sits in the U. S. Congress won’t matter. Who sits in charge anywhere won’t matter. Because no one, not in these seats, will be well enough and able enough to care any more.

 

WHY THIS MATTERS

 

Real strength is always in numbers. And, the real numbers are located within our communities. Not on Capitol Hill. Which, by the way, has been and will continue to be in an internal mess. Trump “top drawer” people, or not!

 

WHY THIS MATTERS

 

Because you matter! Take a closer look around – and inside your own life.

 

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What matters is why it matters.

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Thank you very much for visiting “Painting with Bob” during 2016.

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting It: Accent Colors Change Appearance and Enhance Amenities

Every four years, a small chain of London area boutique hotels changes its color on the accent wall in each guest room. The owners believe that their clientele, largely repeat visitors, appreciate this gesture.

 

“They like the uplift,” emailed the company’s senior painter. “We are careful to select a color that is just coming into vogue.”

 

For 2017, the hotels’ owners have authorized their (three) staff painters to also apply the new accent color to the vanity alcove and nearby walk-in closet in each room. “This blends the different areas together…” the painter added.

 

The guest reviews have been very positive. Examples: “Lovely effect when entering bath area.”  “Most inviting color unity.”  “Pleasant add-on.”  “Delightful change.”

 

The senior painter ended his e-mail by saying, “I recommend the accent wall for any room or area. It enhances appearance and updates the décor at minimal cost…”

 

 

10 ADVANTAGES TO ADDING ACCENT COLORS TO DÉCOR

 

  1. It changes the overall appearance of the specific area, and entire room.
  2. It changes the overall “feel” of the room.
  3. It freshens the overall look of the entire room or suite.
  4. It enhances the benefits of the standard amenities in the room or area.
  5. It upgrades the overall design of the room or suite.
  6. It updates the color scheme in the room or suite.
  7. It expands the standard color scheme’s customer/guest appeal.
  8. It expands the area’s marketability.
  9. It offers positive visual change at a marginal cost.
  10. It offers a way to use up premium paint in colors no longer a part of color scheme.

 

 

10 UNIQUE APPLICATION TIPS FOR USING ACCENT COLORS

 

  1. Reverse the “apply accent color to the wall” rule. Apply the accent color to the trim, doors and frames, and window sills located on one wall.
  2. Spray paint the ceiling in the new accent color.
  3. Use accent color to faux finish a 3-inch border around the parameter of the ceiling.
  4. Create a vertical stripe effect by alternatively painting the accent color every 2 or 3 inches over the wall’s existing color.
  5. Create a drop ceiling effect by applying accent color in a 3 inch border around ceiling, then down 3 inches at the top of all four walls.
  6. Paint accent color on the worst-condition wall and/or trim surfaces in a room.
  7. Paint accent color adjacent to the surface in the worst condition – eg. dents, poorly matched to touch-ups, gouges, minor water damage.
  8. Hardwood and/or tile floors? Paint “pathway” from inside entry doorway all the way to the bathroom’s tub area. Note: A clear over coat may be advisable.
  9. Create draped canopy effect on bed wall by painting accent color in alternate space, from marked vertical center.
  10. Paint 3-inch block border around one wall in room, painting alternate blocks in accent color.

 

You get the picture. When it comes to applying accent paint colors, your options are wide open!

 

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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