Painting and Decorating Made Easier!

Posts tagged ‘Hotel painter/decorator’

Cocoa Beach Hotel Faces Changes Head On

In March, a hotel GM in Cocoa Beach invited me to stay there for several days. It was the idea of the property management company that had contacted me, way back in 2013, about a position.

 

“Pack a clean set of whites,” had been added at the end of the email. Curious. I did as requested, and headed for the ocean.

 

For the next three days, the hotel’s painter and management company regional director of operations led me around the property. They pointed out surfaces that needed work. They walked me through areas they wanted to improve. They showed me themes and color schemes that the owners wanted to change. And, they made lots of notes on their iPads.

 

The fourth day, we revisited some of those areas. Then, we sat at a small shaded table, and went over the men’s notes. By that time, typed into a hard copy for each of us.

 

Usually, that’s when “the best laid plan hits the fan” (my paraphrase). What the budget can bear differs a lot from the combined needs and wish lists. And, available time and manpower.

 

Not in this case. Everyone at the decision table has been motivated – and ready to move.

 

For example: Here’s what has happened within the last month and a half.

 

  1. A local general contractor was hired to repair and upgrade guest rooms and suites, two restaurants, game room, health club, children’s playground, and part of the conference center.

 

  1. A specialty contractor has signed on to remodel the main kitchen, and public restrooms.

 

  1. The GM has been authorized to add three people to the engineering staff for two full years.

All three will start work August 01, 2017. Each will handle specific aspects of the property upgrade.

 

  1. Grounds-landscaping specialist – Redesign and re-landscape the front entrance, nature sanctuary, rest, and walkway areas.
  2. HVAC and OSHA specialist – Handle vent system cleaning, filter installation, room thermostat replacements, bathroom fan/ventilation system cleaning and repairs.
  3. Painter – Prepping and repainting all areas designated on the improvement list.

 

Each of the three new engineering employees worked previously at, or on, the hotel property.

 

Each is a certified specialist in his or her trade.

 

Each is proficient in English and Spanish. One also speaks and writes Portuguese and Mandarin Chinese.

 

Each is related to a current hotel staff member.

 

Few engineering departments are able to gain three additional workers at once. Fewer have the luxury to employ three specialists at once.

 

It is done more readily in other parts of the U. S. It can be done when both the hotel management and owners are operating on the same wave length. At the same time.

 

An exciting thing to see in action – to be a part of – when it happens.

 

 

“Together… making a place for the human spirit to find ease, if only for one night’s stay…”

 From: Somewhere Safe with Somebody Good, by Jan Karon. Copyright 2015.

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

As always! Many thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2017. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painter’s View: The Finer Essence: A View of Fathers

The Finer Essence is part of the title of a 32-page booklet, written and published by my mother for her cousins and children, my sister, and I.  It’s a collection of biographical stories about some of the fathers in our family. (Including my father, grandfathers, great uncles, great-grandfathers, etc.)

 

Originally, the plan called for the soft cover publication to be ready for distribution near Father’s Day of 2008.

 

However, the publication date got moved back when I suffered my first adverse reaction to exposure to very high levels of major myotoxins. Specifically, black mold infestation.

 

Eight years, and a lot more genealogical research, later the illustrated, full-color book – expanded to 40 pages – rolled off the press. Well, out of the printer.

 

Last week-end (four days ago), its pages got collated into sets, flat stapled, and folded. Then inserted into white 10 x 13 envelopes. And, as I write this post, they’re being weighed, meter posted, and mailed at the nearest U. S. Postal Service counter.

 

The books will not arrive (except my copy) in time for Christmas. Close enough, though.

 

It’s one of those gifts – about ancestry – that can keep on giving. Every time someone opens the book’s front cover.

 

What kind of gift can you give that will keep on giving? For generations, perhaps?

 

******************************************************************

Best wishes for a safe, healthy and joy-filled holiday season.

******************************************************************

 

Many thanks to everyone for visiting “Painting with Bob” – and for doing what you can to make the work world a better place.

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Painter’s World: MEET ZACHARY

A True Hotel Holiday Tale…

 

At first, I thought the teen might have had a problem with depression. He sat on a nearby bench, doubled over. Just staring into the ground.

 

But depression turned out not to be what was weighing down this kid.

 

His name was Zachary. He was visiting Walt Disney World with his parents and grandparents. It was his nineteenth birthday. And evidently, one year ago, on December 24, he’d lost his little brother, Matt, to brain cancer.

 

“Matty was only nine,” the teenage guest told me.

 

We continued to chat as I clear-coated the span of wood railing.  Zachary said that his only sibling had had “a rough time” from the start.

 

“Matty was born with a hole in his heart.” Then the child was only five when he started to complain of “feeling whoozie” and “having pain inside” his head.

 

Zachary said that he felt guilty for being alive. And, with no problems at all.

 

Eventually, I ran out of railing to finish coat. And, I needed to move on to the next project on my list.

 

That afternoon, Zachary showed up again. I was repainting a large built-in seat in a rest area. The teen watched intently. He appeared to be much calmer.

 

“How do you do that?” he asked.

 

“Do what?”

 

“Maneuver that brush that way? Really radical.”

 

“Radical? Like in…?” I asked.

 

“Like in neat. Cool.” He hesitated. “I’d like to learn how to do that.”

 

“Step up. I’d be glad to show you.”

 

It was completely against policy. Letting a hotel guest be in a “fresh paint zone.” Letting a guest – a kid – handle any of our word tools, or use any paint product.

 

Probably, I could have gotten fired on the spot if my chief engineer would have come along. But, this kid – practically an adult – reminded me of someone else when he’d been grieving. Me – for my father.

 

Zachary stepped forward. I handed him a second two-inch angled paint brush, dipped in a little Forest Green paint.

 

“Closely watch my hand. It’s all in the wrist.”

 

The teen guest watched, then tried to mimic my wrist-hand movement. On the third try, he got the basic idea. A smile of satisfaction crossed his face.

 

“Matty loved to paint. I bought him an artist kit – you know, one of those sets in a metal box? The Christmas before… His last Christmas with us.”

 

The teen’s look dropped again. Like when I first spotted him that morning. I needed to do – to say – something.

 

“When my dad died suddenly, I thought I’d never paint again.” I told Zachary that my dad and I had worked together. “That made it extra hard,” I acknowledged.

 

I told the teen how one day I looked at Dad’s brushes. I picked up one of them. “And, you know what? That heavy feeling in my heart? It just sort of got a little better.”

 

The teen guest looked at me. He handed my brush back. And, he started to walk away. He turned back.

 

“I just remembered: I brought Matty’s artist kit along in my luggage.”

 

Zachary was going to be all right. At least for now, perhaps he had a way to make some sense of the whole thing. And, be able to enjoy the holidays with his parents, and grandparents – in their eighties.

 

************************************************************************************

Take note. Heads up. Every guest… every coworker… could use a little boost.

************************************************************************************

A year’s worth of thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

GOOD NEWS! GOOD PAINTER ON BOARD!

The best news that I’d received in over three years came from the director of security at Seralago Hotel and Suites, my former work home for over six years.

 

The painter that they’d hired over six months earlier was doing a good job at keeping up the property. That meant he was treating the surfaces right!

 

A related piece of great news: The new painter’s job was being limited to “painting only, and minimal maintenance work.” BRAVO! Taking care of the painting and decorating needs of the historic, 614 room/suite property was a busy, full-time job for one good painter.

 

Also, management had realized that the staff painter did not have the time and capabilities to also handle health-risky and high-exposure work orders and projects such as black mold remediation and mitigation and pest control. So those tasks had been turned over to others.

 

 Five ways for management to protect their investment in that good painter

 

  1. Keep your painter stocked with his or her basic supplies. See that each and every requisition is handled with respect, filled promptly, and as he/she ordered.
  2. Use his or her suggestions often enough, that it’s apparent you’re serious and not just “filling the air waves” with talk.
  3. Respect his or her scheduling needs and limitations. A good painter knows when and what to do to achieve the best results possible.
  4. Unless necessary, avoid switching him or her to other work orders and areas, from time-and-product-sensitive projects already work is underway.
  5. Don’t waste his or her valuable project time with questions, complaints and exchanges that can wait until he or she can spare a few minutes – and give you fair consideration.
  6. Never pull him away from a crucial application procedure. Example: quick-drying paint.
  7. Treat him or her to a quick lunch every six-to-eight weeks, and talk about whatever.
  8. Once a week, do a property “walk through” together. Let him or her point out areas that will need some attention. And, let him or her suggest when and how to take care of each.

 

It’s always good news to hear that a good painter has found his “canvas” – on a property on which I’ve worked in the past.

 

It means a win-win-win for everyone. The people – teammates, guests, visitors, suppliers – have a painter around that they can count on, and can trust. The property has been placed in good hands again. And, rather selfishly, I can rest easier knowing that the surfaces and areas that I’ve cared a lot about are being taking care of RIGHT!

 

Thank you to the folks with Seralago that brought that painting pro on board.

 

By the way, congratulations, fellow painter and decorator, on your upcoming one-year work anniversary.

 

******************************************************************************************

Good painters place a high value on each other’s abilities – and accomplishments.

******************************************************************************************

 

Special thanks to the chief engineers and directors of facility services who treat their painters right – and respect them as professionals and friends.

 

And, thank you, everyone, for visiting “Painting with Bob.”
Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Tag Cloud