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Painter’s View: Ten Spaces and Ten Reasons to Paint on New Year’s Week-end

New Year’s week-end is a great time to pick up a brush, and paint.

 

Because of the busy holidays, at least some of your regular schedule is probably still on hold. You’re in a more relaxed, “winding down” mode. And, you’re already psyched up to try new things, new ways.

 

 TEN REASONS TO PAINT ON NEW YEAR’S WEEK-END

 

  1. You may have more time off to paint things other than assigned work orders and tasks.
  2. Paint stores are running super pre-2017 sales.
  3. Many product manufacturers’ websites and apps are offering two-and-three-for-one discounts.
  4. Manufacturers are offering introductory discounts on paint products in the new 2017 colors.
  5. You may need a physical outlet to vent that holiday season stress.
  6. At work, your chief engineer may be more amenable to your doing that creative project that you’ve suggested.
  7. At home, the holiday spirit will still be wide open for creative expression.
  8. Your energy and enthusiasm levels are still at a high.
  9. Your willingness may be greater to accept a little help from your crew.
  10. You “need to paint this now” – while you’re in the mood.

 

 TEN SPACES TO PAINT ON NEW YEAR’S WEEK-END

 

  1. Rooms at home: a bathroom, bedroom, sun porch, study/den, attic room, sewing room.

TIP: Steer clear of high activity areas during the holidays – eg. kitchen, media room.

  1. Areas at home: workroom in basement or garage, garage/barn loft, small apartment, workshop.
  2. Rentals: apartment, loft, duplex unit; small house, condo or townhome.
  3. Home-based work space: office, writing/artist studio, computer room/alcove, assembly room.
  4. On-site work spaces: bosses’ offices and bathrooms, art gallery offices, shop offices; kitchen/lunch room; non-profit offices, workrooms, or restrooms.
  5. Furniture: simply designed chairs, table in good condition, smaller dresser/chest, bed, smooth-surface desk, picture/mirror frames; bookcases, storage units.
  6. Built-ins: eating nooks, window seat areas, bookshelves, cabinetry doors/frames, home office cubicle.
  7. Fun spaces: Jewelry/treasure boxes; children’s sleeping loft or playhouse; children’s toy chest; dollhouse, play barn/fort; doghouse.
  8. Elderly friend/relative space: front entry, living/dining area, bedroom, den/study, enclosed sun room; ALF/retirement community apartment or villa.

TIP: Pre-arrange for the resident to stay with a neighbor, relative or friend for the week-end. Or,              perhaps in your home?

  1. Your church: Unless the buildings are new, nearly every room/area may need a pro painter’s touch.

TIP: Look for smaller rooms that have been ignored or neglected aesthetically. Examples: Sunday             school rooms, library room, workroom, bulletin/newsletter/printing room, office workroom and storage rooms; kitchen/pantry; choir practice room and robe storage.

 

TOP TIP: Make it a project of your choice. Make it a do-good, do-well endeavor.

 

P. S. My New Year’s project: Applying matching faux finish pattern to two, curbside discarded, two-drawer metal file cabinets.

 

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Happy New Year, everyone. Enjoy. Stay safe. Be well.

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Here’s hoping to hear from you in the New Year – 2017.

Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob” during 2016.

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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Painting with Marley – and One Curious 3-Year Old

A surprise visit from a property owner’s pet iguana reminded me of an old iguana friend.

 

“Marley” and I met in June of 2007. On the walkway between Engineering Department’s doors and the back of the building.

 

He measured at least four feet in length. weighing over ten pounds. And, he blocked my path. Refusing to budge.

 

I stood and stared. Captivated by this amazing, and beautiful, creature.

 

His scales glistened in the bright sun. Showing off a kaleidoscope of hues in green, blue, red, and orange. He had a “third – parietal – eye” on the top of his head. A tall-to-short row of spines – “dewlap” – that ran down his back to the tail. Behind his neck, I saw these small, “spoke” like scales. And, then there was a very large round scale on each cheek.

 

It was my first very close encounter with a Green iguana. Considered a 21st century descendent of the prehistoric Polychrotid lizard.

 

Getting back to Marley. The name I gave him in late 2007, after crossing his path at least weekly.

 

One morning, our meeting was not exactly friendly. I’d needed to leave a freshly-coated exterior corridor, on the second story to help my boss move something very heavy.

 

Upon returning, I found claw marks in the damp, unset paint. And, Marley lying, leisurely, at the top of the steps that I’d rolled out less than a half-hour earlier.

 

The frustrating point came next. No matter what I did, the iguana would not move. Even when three young guests, in swim trunks, appeared at the foot of the steps.

 

My first instinct: Protect the three boys. Position myself between them and the iguana. That worked fine with the two older children.

 

The youngest, however, ignored me – and the WET PAINT signs. He ran onto the wet surface. Toward the iguana.

 

“AN’MAL! AN’MAL!” he shouted happily. “AN’MAL! Come here.”

 

Well, the “an’mal” raised on all fours. He swished that tail a couple of times. Then, he jumped from the second story landing, to the ground beneath. Scurrying toward the nearest clump of dense bushes.

 

The youngest boy following closely behind. “AN’MAL! AN…..’MAL!”

 

His big brothers chased after him. “NO, DAVID.” “Stop, Davie.”

 

I took off running after all three boys. My greatest concern was for their safety. The second concern: Marley.

 

Suddenly, alongside me appeared this lady in a dripping wet swimsuit. The boys’ mother.

 

In a flash, she had all three sons corralled, and following her back to the gazebo in the pool area.

 

Lucky for me, the iguana’s claw marks in the paint were easy to lightly smooth out with a No. 2 steel wool pad.

 

The first thing next morning, I re-coated that section of the concrete corridor. Guarding the area for fifteen minutes longer than necessary. Until the special coating had dried completely.

 

Moral of the story: Watch out for four-legged creatures and two-legged boys when painting open, and public, spaces.

 

Footnote: The last time I saw Marley was the afternoon of April 19, 2013. He stood on the hotel’s side of the fence. He peered toward the nearby, swampy pond. And, “Charlie,” a resident Alligator, floating along like an old log. Only the top of his snout and beady eyes above water.

 

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Lucky is the painter that can work in the midst of nature.

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Here’s hoping that you have a great month, everyone. Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

The Best Exotic Majestic Hotel – and Your Hotel/Resort

Young co-hotelier Sonny Kapoor’s Best Exotic Majestic Hotel* in Jaipur, India, receives a new investor, and a new co-manager. And, every surface of the run-down, once budget-starved property receives a fresh new coat of paint. Every area graced by a decorator’s new and distinctive touches.

 

Illustrating the point that even one fresh coat of paint can do wonders for any hotel or lodging property. Performing miracles, in fact!

 
A SPECIAL MESSAGE…
… to hoteliers, general managers, directors of engineering, and painters with older hotels. Properties that are basically sound, structurally.

 

Perhaps, your budget can’t afford to cover for a complete aesthetic facelift – at one time. Like the Best Exotic Majestic Hotel received eventually.

 

You can afford to repaint every public surface. One area… one corridor… one guest room… one activity room… one restroom… one conference room at a time. If need be, one wall at a time!

 

In fact, you cannot afford not to commit to this on-going project. You cannot afford not to budget the funds, time, and staff labor to do this.

 

 

In the short-run…

 

Bringing your property up to speed, little-by-little, places less of a strain on the operations and investment budgets.

 

1. It requires less no-booking time and down time for the accommodations and amenities.

 

2. It demands less use of a staff painter’s clock-time and skills at once.

 

3. And, it reduces guest and visitor complaints, “comps,” and refunds.

 

 

In the long-run…

 

Bringing your property up to speed, little-by-little, leaves only the major projects to budget with large capital commitments. Based on your priorities, plans, pre-set schedules, and availability.

 

 

Three keys to a hotel painter’s quality control…

 

1. Any hotel painter can do a very decent job at keeping his or her property in shape within a continuously-funded paint maintenance budget.

 

2. Most hotel painters can do a satisfactory job at getting his or her property back in good public shape, with a regular basic facelift project budget, at his or her disposal.

 

3. A handful of hotel painters can do a splendid job of pulling off a major facelift, little-by-little. With an inconsistent, unsupported and poorly funded budget.

 

Miracle performers like that do not come along very often. And, they don’t stay. Not even with historic places like the Best Exotic Majestic Hotel.

 

* The Pearl Palace Heritage Guesthouse, in Jaipur, served as a location for both “Exotic Majestic Hotel” movies. Since the production of the first film in 2012, it has enjoyed record-high occupancy. On a consistent basis.

 

Alas, its primary owner has been able to restore the property. He has added many traditional amenities, that make it a favorite stay for Jaipur tourists and visitors.

 

Go! Enjoy! Taste!

 

And, if you time it right, you will be there when a cast or crew member of either the 2012 film, or its 2015 sequel, is visiting, too.

 

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“The only real thing is the thing yet to try…” Evelyn, played  by Judy Dench.

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Many thanks for stepping out, and taking a chance. Thanks for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

Painting Them: Indoor and Outdoor Garden Area: Introduction to Care

What makes a garden really stand out consists of more than just flowers and plants.

 

Start with a do it yourself landscape design first. And, let your creative juices flow.

 

“Painting” is usually secondary to selecting the structural elements you incorporate into your garden. These would be a bridge, an arbor, a trellis, a deck, wood fencing, and even signage.

 

Elements of Wood

 

Once the elements are in place, if they are constructed of wood, they will need protection from the environment, wildlife, people, etc. Especially water!

 

For durability and protection from fungus and rotting, I recommend the following:

 

  1. Prime wood with an oil-based product. Apply “two coats” acrylic latex or oil base material.

Apply clear wood preservative (a very effective add-on.) ex. Thompson’s Water Seal or

Sonneborn sealants.

 

  1. Apply “two coats” solid color oil-based stain. Apply a clear wood preservative.

 

  1. Pre-finish the surface with an oil-based primer. Apply elastomeric finish as a top coat.

 

  1. Wood can be finished with a clear waterproofing coating to preserve natural look.

 

  1. For signage, use acrylic latex or oil-based finish, then an acrylic clear finish for protection.

 

  1. For wood products, embedded below grade, I recommend using a creosote or

other tar-based product to reduce the chances of wood rot.

 

Once the garden’s amenities have been installed, set a schedule for their regular upkeep. This would involve cleaning.

  1. Recommended: either a biodegradable cleaning agent, or a bicarbonate solution which is harmless to plants.
  2. When cleaning mold infested exterior surfaces do not use bleach. It will burn the leaves of your plants.

 

In some cases, I would advise using stone for building walkways and bridges, rather than a high maintenance wood product. In any case, you want to use a paint which resists moisture penetration.

 

Then there will be more quality time available to look at the flowers, versus the rotting wood.

 

A garden can be a wonderful place for a painting project. And, one of the most relaxing places to soothe the stresses of the day.

 

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Create a garden spot for others to enjoy with you, and for you to honor alone.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.” Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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