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Posts tagged ‘Hotel staff’

Painter’s World: Little Acts of Appreciation

Every day, a painter’s world includes opportunities to show his or her appreciation. To someone. For something.

 

Ten Acts of Appreciation a Hotel Painter Can Try

 

  1. Thank your teammates, supervisor, and other coworkers for their help, support, etc.
  2. Go easy on the teammate that goofed, again. Even if he or she could have prevented it.
  3. Hold the door open for a hotel guest trying to get moved into his or her room.
  4. Offer to hold something so a guest can strap his or her toddler into the safety car seat.
  5. Cut your chief engineer some slack. Tell him or her, “That’s okay. I can see that you’re under a lot of extra pressure right now…”
  6. Volunteer an extra pair of hands to a teammate, or staff member in another department.
  7. Offer that grumpier or aloof co-worker a way to talk to you without any explanation.
  8. Cover for a teammate when he or she needs to make a personal call during work time.
  9. Cut your co-workers some slack, especially when the work pressure is getting to them.
  10. Discreetly offer a “listening ear” to a co-worker whose mood/behavior/attitude has changed for some reason.

 

Ten Acts of Appreciation a Commercial-Industrial Painter Can Try

 

  1. Thank your fellow crew members for their efforts to bring in a project within constraints.
  2. Offer to cover for a co-worker who needs a little longer lunch or break time.
  3. Foreman: offer the worker, who is very pressured by personal responsibilities, the option to occasionally start work a little later. Or to leave a little earlier..
  4. Give the new guy a hand, or two. Even if he or she is experienced. Remember when you started out there?
  5. Cut that apprentice some slack. He or she is new to painting, and new to your company.
  6. Periodically, thank and visit your suppliers’ stores, shops, websites, LinkedIn.com, etc.
  7. Periodically connect with both your strong and less strong connections through social media. Acknowledge their recent accomplishments, or news. Thank them for any input they’ve given.
  8. On-site crew member: Loan a better paintbrush to a newer coworker, who might not yet own the size or type of brush needed to do the task.
  9. Thank and praise both long-standing and newer crew members. Especially when things have been going rough on the project, and/or for the company
  10. Thank your company’s office staff for making your job more doable. Please thank your foreman, superintendent/boss and company owner once periodically, too.

 

FOOTNOTE: I remember every person that has helped me, as a painter, to have a good day. Their smiles or laughs.  Their joking jabs. Their choices of words. Their handshakes. Their encouragement. The hands that they lent me. Their “training.” Their advice and constructive criticism. It all mattered to me. They all mattered to me.

 

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Showing appreciation works better when it’s sincere, spontaneous, and individualized.

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Behind “Painting with Bob” is a network of dedicated painters, professionals, friends, and editor.

Copyright 2018. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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Painter’s View: The Finer Essence: A View of Fathers

The Finer Essence is part of the title of a 32-page booklet, written and published by my mother for her cousins and children, my sister, and I.  It’s a collection of biographical stories about some of the fathers in our family. (Including my father, grandfathers, great uncles, great-grandfathers, etc.)

 

Originally, the plan called for the soft cover publication to be ready for distribution near Father’s Day of 2008.

 

However, the publication date got moved back when I suffered my first adverse reaction to exposure to very high levels of major myotoxins. Specifically, black mold infestation.

 

Eight years, and a lot more genealogical research, later the illustrated, full-color book – expanded to 40 pages – rolled off the press. Well, out of the printer.

 

Last week-end (four days ago), its pages got collated into sets, flat stapled, and folded. Then inserted into white 10 x 13 envelopes. And, as I write this post, they’re being weighed, meter posted, and mailed at the nearest U. S. Postal Service counter.

 

The books will not arrive (except my copy) in time for Christmas. Close enough, though.

 

It’s one of those gifts – about ancestry – that can keep on giving. Every time someone opens the book’s front cover.

 

What kind of gift can you give that will keep on giving? For generations, perhaps?

 

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Best wishes for a safe, healthy and joy-filled holiday season.

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Many thanks to everyone for visiting “Painting with Bob” – and for doing what you can to make the work world a better place.

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

Painter’s View: How Management Can Hold Onto Their Good People

In 2015, I read this quote by an icon in the Hospitality industry:

 

“When a good person leaves, look to the leader for the reason.”

 

Many things can be done to hold onto a good worker. Things that are above board, fair and constructive; also cost-effective in the long haul.

 

 

TWENTY-ONE WAYS TO HOLD ONTO A GOOD WORKER

 

 

  1. Honor the work anniversary of each staff member.

 

  1. Level with him or her about why you can’t afford to issue a pay raise.

 

  1. Regularly, offer staff members discount and gift cards for items sold at the hotel. Make the amounts large enough.

 

  1. Show that you’re serious about his or her written suggestions and “observations.” Authorize the staff member to look into one or more of them.

 

  1. Encourage small “teams” of staffers to follow through on at least one idea, that is doable at the time.

 

  1. Monthly, host an informal coffee break with staffers. Select and rotate the day of the week.

 

  1. Find out about your workers. Who are they? What do they like about working at the hotel? What special challenges are they dealing with?

 

  1. About your staff members: Who aspires to advance with the hotel, or in the industry? Doing what? Who is taking classes, or wants to do so? Who is interested in on-the-job training?

 

  1. Who is interested in “doing something else” at the hotel? What? When? Are they willing to work into another position?

 

  1. Encourage participation in staff activities and events. See that scheduling is convenient, costs are very low or free, and time commitment will not interfere with their personal responsibilities.

 

  1. See that a variety of staff activities and events are offered. And, put in an appearance at as many of them as possible.

 

  1. Promote team member mentoring and support. Encourage staff members to cover each other’s backs.

 

  1. Maintain an “open door” policy. Encourage all supervisors and managers to do the same.

 

  1. Do little things to let staff members know you are there for them. That does not mean you have to agree with them on an issue, or they with you.

 

  1. See that your workers get what they need to do their regular jobs.

 

  1. Never put any staff member in the middle of a conflict between you and his/her supervisor, or another staff member.

 

  1. Never accuse any staff member of any wrongdoing unless you’re sure – and your proof is 100 percent reliable.

 

  1. Never remove a benefit or offer unless it is the only option. Then, be up front about it and make the change as promptly and smoothly as possible.

 

  1. Forget the favors. Just be fair and honest!

 

 

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Managers that cover the backs of all staff members will find their own backs covered, too.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

 

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

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