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Posts tagged ‘Hotel/facility painters’

14 Favors to Do for Your Replacement

You’re leaving the painter’s job at the hotel or facility. A new painter will be taking over.

Your aim should always be to leave the “Painter’s Post,” Paintshop,” and all related support systems in top shape for your successor.

 

You can play a key role in the new painter’s ability to start on the right foot. He or she needs and deserves:

(a) to be welcomed warmly by your former “family” – teammates and managers;

(b) to adjust well to his or her new workplace, system, and company policies;

(c) to learn to do the job needed and expected, and,

(d) to reach the confidence level needed to be a vital, valuable member of that “community.”

 

You want to do everything that you can – during your last week or two there – to ensure that he or she will be glad about accepting the job.

 
1. Leave him or her a list or chart about the following: (a) standard tasks, (b) usual work orders, (c) current projects, (d) departmental troubleshooting projects, (d) projects on the agenda, and, (e) projects on hold because of budgetary/management constraints.

 

2. Leave an up-to-date list of products, materials and supplies that (a) have been ordered for necessary, basic use; (b) have been requisitioned but put on hold; (c) were requisitioned but turned down; (d) need to be ordered for current projects; and (e) need to be requisitioned for upcoming projects.

 

3. Leave a list of little “inside” job secrets, and handy-to-know things.

 

4. Encourage your department teammates, fellow staff members and supervisor(s) to treat the new guy right! To include him or her in their lunch groups. And, to cut him or her some slack.

 

5. Finish as many uncompleted orders and small-to-mid sized projects as you can. Note: You may need to prioritize a bit.

 

6. Prepare and leave a simple guide that correlates with the company’s “Painter” job description.

 

7. Update the Paintshop inventory list. And, leave it in an easy-to-see place.

 

8. Sort, organize and shelve – in a handy spot – all manuals, MSDSs, spec sheets, guides, tutorials, videos, tapes, etc.

 

9. Clear out, clean up and straighten up the Paintshop.

 

10. Clearly label, then organize and properly store all product containers.

 

11. Leave all essential tools and equipment in good-to-go working order. Well, the best that you can do. Note: Thoroughly clean all painting and finishing tools and equipment used regularly.

 

12. Clean, launder, fold, and store all dropcloths; reusable “suit-ups,” hats/caps, work gloves, etc.

 

13. Clean out, vacuum, wash, and wax the “Painter’s Golf Cart.”

– Put air in the tires. Fully charge the battery(ies). Clean the windshield, and fill the wiper fluid reservoir. If gas-operated, fill up the tank the last day you’re there.

 

14. Leave your desk, computer, mobile devices, and related spaces ready for the new person. TIP – LAST DAY: Before you clock out, delete your user/access name, password, security/I.D., number, plus all personnel, personal, and other information.

 

BONUS: If supervisors and management approve, offer to be available to the new painter for questions – on a limited basis. Until he or she gets settled and learns the ropes. TIP: Especially helpful if you were there more than five years.

BONUS: To the best of your ability, leave the “Painter” name/title in real good shape there.

BONUS: Leave behind a good – make that great – “Paintshop” reputation.

SUPER BONUS: If appropriate, leave a “Best Wishes” or “Good Luck” card for the new painter. Keep it light, and very brief.

 

AFTER YOU LEAVE: Stay away from the business, and off of the property. For one full year, at least. Exceptions: You need to pick up or drop off something. You’re applying for a job opening. You’ve been invited there for a specific, appropriate reason. TIP: Go straight to the designated area. Do not pass “GO.”

 

Give the new painter a good chance to get settled, find his or her way around, make friends, gain support, and succeed!

 

You want the new painter to be glad that he or she is there. A part of the engineering/facility services team. And, a part of the organization!

 

You have the power! The new painter’s success may depend on how you leave things there. (Realizing that some things tend to be out of your control.)

You can leave behind a shining – and lasting – example of integrity, honesty, fair play, respect, friendship, and, professionalism.

A legacy that the new painter can build upon, to succeed in his or her own way.

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A painter’s most trusted friend can be the painter that he or she is replacing.

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Thank you for visiting “Painting with Bob.”

Copyright 2016. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

HOSPITALITY PAINTERS CREATE FRIENDLY SPACES

“Hospitality painters create a friendly space where strangers can enter and find safety.”*

*Paraphrase of Stephen G. Post.

 

A hospitality painter’s goal is to leave a space in better shape that it was before. Its surfaces and areas in improved condition. Its appearance and appeal more inviting and alluring to the senses, and the psyche.

 

A safe hospitality painter follows all health and safety rules, standards, codes, policies, and procedures. Set by the trade and construction industry, product manufacturers, government, property owners/ business, and community.

 

A committed hospitality painter stays alert, keeps his/her nose clean, thinks ahead, pays attention, and does whatever it takes to take care of the space.

 

A creative hospitality painter looks, continually, for spaces to touch with his or her brush or roller.

 

An innovative hospitality painter seeks spaces that will test his or her skills with a spray gun system.

 

A construction-experienced hospitality painter actually “sniffs out” potential problems, and professionally applies his or her knowledge to minimize – and even prevent – structural damage and loss.

 

A diversified hospitality painter steps up to the plate, whatever the need might be, always willing to lend a hand.

 

A  flexible hospitality painter moves back-and-forth, in-and-out, up-and-down between projects, tasks and work orders with remarkable adeptness, agility, accuracy, and neatness.

 

A savvy hospitality painter represents a unique and appropriate blend of all of these key abilities and characteristics.

 

A hotel or facility that employs such a painter is, and will be, blessed beyond measure.

 

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Special praise to Mark C., Jay B., John L., Hosea F., Antonio F., Steve M., Paulo H., etc. – five-star, savvy hospitality painters and decorators.

 

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Thank you from “Painting with Bob” for checking in, reading, emailing, calling, and writing.

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Copyright 2015. Robert D. Hajtovik. All rights reserved.

 

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